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Le freak c'est chic


josh a

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No disco sucked . . . it was the death of funk. Listen to the drums! Rodgers and Edwards ruled despite being disco-funk. Disco simplified the whole relationship between bass, rhythm guitars and drums etc. to a dumb four-square rhythm with the odd cool bass lick over the top. Nile and Bernard simply wrote and arranged good music that was alwats more complex than it sounded.
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I agree that disco does not deserve the same regard as many other genres, but at least there was usually that cool bass lick! In many genres that followed - rap, punk, emo, etc. - in my subjective opinion there isn't that cool bass or any other lick.

 

It's a relative opinion based on low expectations - disco often had that one cool thing, whereas I listen to say punk music and I hear no cool things. It's just my opinion, of course.

 

Disco was quite simple, but that's simple compared with funk or jazz or more complex genres. Compared with the Sex Pistols or Biz Markie, disco is way more complex musically.

 

Disco is the weak-hitting shortstop nobody values...except when he makes a great defensive play. I heard "Forget Me Not," a disco tune with a great bassline (and other good parts), on the radio today and I blasted it. Thank you disco.

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Well hooray for disco for funding Jeremy's lifestyle! :) That's worthwhile, at least.

Of course I have my own disco favourites - Forget-me-nots (Patrice Rushen); Ring My Bell (Anita Ward), Edwin Starr, etc.

 

If only most disco had been as good as Chic!!!

 

Just that historically it entered the musical universe with the effect that it watered down funky music. Listen to bands like Slave, EWF, Ohio Players, Parliament and others in the 70s and then listen to their disco equivalents (often the same bands/musicians).

 

 

But then, there wasn't much that I enjoyed listening to recorded in the 80s. I know disco started earlier than that but in my mind I always associate it with an 80s mentality.

 

 

Hey Jeremy, what did you wear? Do you have any pictures?!!

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I played a disco medley that inclued Respect, , le chic, we are family and many others people loved.

 

www.myspace.com/davidbassportugal

 

"And then the magical unicorn will come prancing down the rainbow and we'll all join hands for a rousing chorus of Kumbaya." - by davio

 

 

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Had a 3 piece, with a female front, top 40 rock cover band in the early eighties. We did no disco, but nothing would fill the dance floor faster than quarter notes on the kick, ala disco beat. We would start 'gimme 3 steps' with 4 measures of that. The floor would be fillin before they even knew what the song was. We worked the 'quarters on the kick' into a few rock n roll songs. My drummers usually didn't like it, as it was 'Sacrilegious' to them, but dancing = drink sales = happy bar owners = rebooks. Also, the more girls on the floor, the more enjoyable the gig. The power of the kick.....brings out the primal.
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People crave predictabilty in music and disco is a more predictable form/development of funk. Many find it esaier to dance to a four-on-the floor rhythm. If you play a tumbao in a Bolton or Leeds club you might get puzzled faces but every knows where they are with

THUD-thud-thud-thud especially with the handclaps!It was also related to the disco dance scene and the emerging gay disco scene.

It was always ever the more predictable stuff that was more popular however in any popular genre throughout the century.

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Well, that's interesting Rocky. Many musical developments have been dance driven, sometimes more than we realise. I certainly understood the development (and some of the terminology) of Afro-Cuban, Puerto Rican and other music better when I took some time to study the development of the dance styles. Even something like the use of particular narcotic drugs can act as a 'stimulant' ;) for a particular tempo or musical style.

I'm a little sorry to have taken this thread OT as there is a whole thread's worth just on Chic/Sister Sledge in particlular.

I never saw Chic as typical disco more as disco-funk. Most of the mid-late seventies disco was sometimes of a different order to then the late70s-early 80s stuff.

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Here's that band picture from the disco bands.

The shirts were red satin.

 

One of these days I'll put up a "history of my band pictures" on my website. It's pretty interesting. The hair gets longer and longer and then shorter and shorter. Looking at the band pictures (which is what I have been doing this morning) gives a nice history of fashions over the last forty years. The glasses I was wearing in this picture is actually the funniest thing to me.

 

http://home.jps.net/~jeremy/discoJer.JPG

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Damn. Disco as you wanna be, J!

 

Bernard Edwards was a funky funky man. I dug his rap.

 

Regarding disco as a style of music and it's popularity I tend to agree with Phil. It was/is simplified and more predictable funk. Even the most rhythmically challenged could figure out the beat in disco and dance to it. Add an enticing "party, sex, and drugs" lifestyle to the scene and you've got yourself a popular fad. Mercifully a popular fad that didn't last long.

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Chad, is your sig, perhaps, from Doonesbury? Something said by Jay 'Wah Wah' Graydon? Sounds like his style...

 

Regarding Disco - it was cool, coming out of the mid-70s rock scene, to denegrate Disco with a disdainful toss of the head, but it's been an enduring party music for 30 years, so there must be something to it. It's true, nothing fills a dance floor faster.

 

One of our exploding keyboard players with the 'tones went from us (playing The Band, Allman Bros, Beatles, Little Feat, etc) to play in a Disco band for about two years. They played virtually every night to sold-out shows in large venues, made a ton of cash, and he finally dropped out due to exhaustion. They were turning down gigs as fast as they were booking them, just because they had no open spots on their calendar. this was about 5 years ago.

 

Me, I love some Disco, but more the exception than the rule, though my Inner 70's Death-before-Disco Guy is silently shreiking within me.

 

*smack* Keep it down in there!

Play. Just play.
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Flemmie, the signature line is from Doonesbury, a conversation between Jimmy Thudpucker and Jay "Wah-Wah" Graydon.

 

Don't know if you were around then, but a few years ago none other than Jay Graydon himself (never called "Wah-Wah" in real life, BTW) showed up on this very forum for a few posts. You can see where I asked him about Doonesbury and his reply some posts later in the thread.

 

 

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