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Gigs are coming to an end...now what?


SteveC

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Well, the pop rock/acoustic band that was doing well is coming to an end. Our lead singer has decided that covers aren't doing it for him any more and he wants to write originals. I would guess that the end of the year will bring an end to the band - at least the cover band. He may want a band again - after a few months - to do his tunes. I might get the call for that if it happens, but that's down the road.

 

The jazz gig has dried up as well. A couple players have moved and there never really was much call for us anyway. There's another trio in town that gets most of the work.

 

I said no to a "horn band" after deciding I didn't have time as we were going to focus on the rock band. Although from what I hear, that may have been a good move as that band may be in trouble before it starts.

 

I still have the church gig a couple Sunday's a month and there's the occasional pit gig for community theatre shows.

 

So, any thoughts on how to fill the void?

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Get another singer? I've seen cases where an instrumentalist who can sing puts aside their instrument to try stepping out front.

 

Look for open jams, which require no commitment but offer a chance to mess around and possibly find (or be found by) a band.

 

Spend your time teaching Grace to play bass?

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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Just a thought but...why don't you compose some instrumental material and record it? I think you certainly have the talent to do that...

 

Dave

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

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Originally posted by Dave Sisk:

Just a thought but...why don't you compose some instrumental material and record it? I think you certainly have the talent to do that...

 

Dave

Oh what? Like a solo album? :o Mine will be out by May. I promise. I have a firm deadline (whether or not I'm done by then ... hahahaha!).

 

Steve, maybe take a more active role instead. You have enough gigging experience by now to make this work, for sure. Who knows? You may actually enjoy calling the shots and being in control of your own destiny for once. (Apologies if you've already "been there, done that".)

 

Say you secretly long to play salsa music, but thus far nobody else has had a salsa band you could join. Put one together and take charge! Sure, it's a lot of work, but you get to call the shots. When you're ready to go knock 'em dead, hit up all the venues in town. They may remember you from your previous gigging (remind them, if they need it).

 

If the venues don't pan out, organize a "Hot Latin Dance Night" somewhere, like the outdoor park in the middle of winter. Be crazy. (Well maybe not that crazy; your winters are colder than ours!) Use a "build it and they will come" attitude.

 

All the other bass players in town will be bummed out because they'll know you have a lock on this sensational band that everyone's talking about around town. Woo hoo!

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Hang in there Steve-O.

There have occasionally been dry spells in my "career" and it has always made me appreciate the music that much more when something new comes along.

Hell, I once took six monthes off and had a whole new outlook when I started playing again. It may just be a blessing in disguise.

 

It does make sense that the scene would slow down at this time of year though. Could it be the fact that you can freeze to death getting from the car to the venue door? :P

"He is to music what Stevie Wonder is to photography." getz76

 

I have nothing nice to say so . . .

 

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Originally posted by SteveC:

Well, the pop rock/acoustic band that was doing well is coming to an end. Our lead singer has decided that covers aren't doing it for him any more and he wants to write originals.

So he's going to drop everything while he writes a couple of sets worth of originals? Why can't you incorporate the originals into the current set list?
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If I haven't learned anything in my 49 years, it is the fact that every setback provides an opportunity. 2006 has been a very rough year for me, and last week the whole thing gets capped off by suddenly becoming unemployed (day job).. I put up a profile on Musicians Junction a long while back, and the day I lost my job (I was busy posting resumes, etc.) I checked my email, and there was an inquiry from that site, country singer, song on the indie charts, looking to form road band...Considered it a sign from somewhere... Followed up on it, there's some terrific upside, but for someone with all the Nashville connections and so forth, I've been to a couple rehearsals, and this is not anywhere's near ready to do a club gig scheduled Dec.1.. I mean the band isn't assembled yet..

 

Welll.. last Sunday I get another email fron the Junction.. full time band, based in Indy, extensive roadwork, XM radio waiting for band to redo their CD for radio quality.. to make long story short we've been in extensive phone and email contact, and I'm going to Indy next week to get things started.. I'm finally getting the chance to make my living playing music..

 

My best advice, put your name out there, anyplace where musicians search out each other.. you just might catch a break..

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Originally posted by Dave Sisk:

Just a thought but...why don't you compose some instrumental material and record it? I think you certainly have the talent to do that...

 

Dave

Thanks for the kind words, but I am just not that creative. I can play almost anything, bu tto come up with my own stuff has never really happened.
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Originally posted by Kramer Ferrington III.:

Originally posted by SteveC:

Well, the pop rock/acoustic band that was doing well is coming to an end. Our lead singer has decided that covers aren't doing it for him any more and he wants to write originals.

So he's going to drop everything while he writes a couple of sets worth of originals? Why can't you incorporate the originals into the current set list?
Apparently he wants to go cold turkey. Take 6 months off and com eback all new.
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Hope lies with the keyboard guy I've played with for years and a new guitar player. Both great musicians. If only we could find a drummer that isn't a university student that will leave in a couple years...

 

We've kicked around doing something like a "power trio" or 4 piece. We'll see. Maybe it is a "sign" to take a break. I don't really want to though. I enjoy playing and gigging.

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Well, if you want something to happen, don't sit around waiting for it. Get out there and HUSTLE! If you want to take a hiatus, do nothing. You'll find out pretty quick that when you do nothing, nothing happens. It's really that simple.

Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

 

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Why is it that the singer always thinks he can make it on his own without other people holding him back... :confused:

Tenstrum

 

"Paranoid? Probably. But just because you're paranoid doesn't mean there isn't an invisible demon about to eat your face."

Harry Dresden, Storm Front

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If you want to be playing I'd suggest getting out there and finding some bands to audition for.

 

If you want to take some time to be musically reclusive and woodshed then don't talk to bands and don't audition.

 

Or you could find a new singer in the band you're already in.

 

Or you could offer your services and sub gigs when you felt like playing.

 

Basically you need to step up to the plate and decide for yourself what you'd like to do. No one else is going to be able to make that decision for you, man. If it were me I'd find a new singer for the band that you're already in - assuming you still enjoy playing with the rest of the people in that band. Because finding a new singer is a lot easier than finding a whole new band (usually).

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That's what is frustrating. The guys all get along and like playing together. No real issues. It's great.

 

I think the rest of us are going to go on in some form or another. I just wanted to vent a bit (this is a good place for that) and see what other thought and have done when the "dry spell" or potential dry spell hits.

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There's got to be someone at your church who sings well. Listen carefully to the people singing on Sunday.

 

You'll probably hear some good singing. Invite someone to try singing with your band.

 

They'll be flattered and maybe finding someone who wasn't even thinking about being in a band would be a good idea...they'll have no built-in preconceptions and attitudes.

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Originally posted by SteveC:

If only we could find a drummer that isn't a university student that will leave in a couple years...

A lot can happen in a couple years. Pick up a college student drummer and see what happens.
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Originally posted by jeremy c:

There's got to be someone at your church who sings well.

Great idea, and I really don't want to give Steve a reason not to follow up on it, but I just want to point out the obvious and the need to proceed with caution.

 

Some church-goers aren't that comfortable with your standard bar gig. For one thing, it's in a bar (duh). The other stumbling block is the set list. Some songs may be considered offensive.

 

I remember when we were 11 a drummer friend of mine told me that his parents wouldn't let him listen to Led Zeppelin because it was (in their church's opinion) unholy. Looking back it must have been a stretch even for him to play CCR's "Proud Mary", which he and I performed together with other friends.

 

In the folk group I perform with now, the guitar players confided that they played an open mic before. This perked my interest until I found out they played the same songs we play every Sunday. :rolleyes: Nothing wrong with that, but I was hoping they had some other material within their comfort zone.

 

So, nothing ventured, nothing gained. Go talk to the choir members (that can sing). But be up front about what they will be asked to do. If they don't feel comfortable singing "Devil With The Blue Dress" (or whatever) on Saturday night and then coming to church the next morning, that's fine, just move on.

 

You'll never know if you don't ask.

 

You can't win if you don't play.

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Originally posted by Bumpcity:

Or you could find a new singer in the band you're already in.

 

Winnahhh winnnahh winnahh!

 

Jeremy had a great idea about the church.

Another place to look is the local karaoke bar.

 

Go get 'em tiger!

"He is to music what Stevie Wonder is to photography." getz76

 

I have nothing nice to say so . . .

 

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Step up to the mic Steve! (Or coax your guitarist into doing so).

 

Alex

 

P.S. I don't believe you can't write songs - I just think you have such high standards regarding all things music (look at the details of your tone obsession) that you haven't given yourself a chance. Try it - honestly, you might like it, a lot!

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Actually, we are talking about myself and the keyboard player doing some singing. We aren't that great - really back up quality - but then again, a few "big time" people can't sing very well either. Ben Folds and Billy Joel are a couple that come to mind.
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Originally posted by SteveC:

Actually, we are talking about myself and the keyboard player doing some singing. We aren't that great - really back up quality - but then again, a few "big time" people can't sing very well either. Ben Folds and Billy Joel are a couple that come to mind.

If you can maintain pitch, you can sing. Great voices? Maybe, maybe not, doesn't matter. Lack of beautiful voices didn't stop Louie Armstrong or Rod Stuart from making a living with them. (Actually, I think Billy Joel sings pretty well) Consider a three piece act with what you have. If a singer with an acoustic guitar can get gigs, you can too. We are all expendable, even drummers, it is a challenge, but it also makes your act more affordable, you either adjust your music to the band, or do the electronic drum route. You can make anything work.
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I definitly wouldn't be stopping the band just because one guy thinks he wants to be an "artist". I think ya need to be a little more assertive Steve, get a vision for what you want to do and then make it happen.

 

I don't know what its like where you are but here there are a million singer songwriters & guitar players. Drummers & bass players are an endangered species over here. If I wasn't a married man and already in 2 bands and 2 other jam combos I could play music every night of the week (I almost do, Sorry Missus D). I suppose it comes down to what you want to get from the playing, do you want to make money, is it for the buddy time, do you want to make art. Establish a clear vision and then make it happen, but don't let that other guys ego grow any more!!

 

Good Luck!!

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