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Completely OT: Food


_Sweet Willie_

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Like most people, I really enjoy food. I am actually distrustful of people I meet who do not enjoy food. Even though it's off-topic, I thought it would be worth starting a thread about foods that I enjoy. If you want to post about your favorite foods, so be it. But let's face it, this is essentially an egotistical thread about me and I'm letting the rest of you play... ;):D

 

First of all, I've pretty much come to the conclusion that sausage may be the perfect food. I tend to prefer spicy pork sausage above all others, but have found myself pleasantly surprised by the tastiness of some of the various flavored chicken sausages. Cylindrical meats are a grand thing. haggis . Member of the sausage family or not, this holds no appeal for me. Blood sausage/black pudding -- yes! I've had this and enjoyed it. Haggis? Nay, good friends!>

 

Second, the inspiration for this thread was the plate of scrambled eggs with cheese and ham that I just finished eating -- covered w/ hot sauce (chipotle Tabasco, if you must know). Eggs and cheese are a great match made all the better by a healthy dose of hot sauce.

 

Third, I really like dark chocolate. I don't mean the Hershey's Special Dark candy bar, folks (not that I have anything against it -- it's a solid candy bar). I mean a really dark, very rich, not very sweet chocolate. A small piece of serious dark chocolate can make my day.

 

Fourth, I tend not to be much of a fish eater. However, from time to time I do enjoy a nice piece of fish. A nice piece of Chilean sea bass (are we on-topic now?) can make me happy. Also, my wife makes a great orange roughy in some kind of soy sauce mixture that's divine.

 

Fifth, there is hardly anything as marvelous as a truly exceptional marinara sauce -- whether it be on pasta or spread over some eggplant or chicken parmigiana or even on a pizza.

 

Sixth, vegetables are our friends. Spinach and garlic sauteed lightly in olive oil is a simple yet delightful accompaniment to many meals.

 

Seventh, not food per se, but a really good cup of coffee can change the direction of the day to the better. I don't mean one of those froofy coffee drinks (which have their place, too, and I've enjoyed my share of things like vanilla lattes), but just the basic cup of coffee when it's strong and flavorful.

 

Peace.

--Doctor Luv

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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I'm drinking a nice strong cup of French roast right now, Willie. And I'm drinking it black, the way the French intended it.

 

I could eat bagels and cream cheese every day for breakfast for my whole life and never be bored.

 

The worst part of aging is being told by various doctors to give up eating things...."watch your cholesterol, watch your weight, watch your digestion, etc."

 

I already have given up drugs, alcohol and sex with random strangers. Now I'm supposed to give up a food that I like?

 

I'm sending out for a pizza right now. (even though it's only 8:30 in the morning.)

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I've met people that don't like the blues, don't like TV, don't like movies, don't care about cars, don't like George Bush, don't like Al Gore, don't like James Brown, etc., etc. I don't think I've ever met anyone who didn't like food. I'd be suspicious too!

 

I have met people who say they don't like water, however. I'm suspicious of them as well. I check to see if they can bend their pinkys.

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#$%^&*^&%^!!!

 

I swear this double post was not my fault! I didn't do it! This computer has a mind of its own!!!!!!

 

 

I've met people that don't like the blues, don't like TV, don't like movies, don't care about cars, don't like George Bush, don't like Al Gore, don't like James Brown, etc., etc. I don't think I've ever met anyone who didn't like food. I'd be suspicious too!

 

I have met people who say they don't like water, however. I'm suspicious of them as well. I check to see if they can bend their pinkys.

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Originally posted by Dr. Sweet Willie:

First of all, I've pretty much come to the conclusion that sausage may be the perfect food

I like your style!

 

I'm a great fan of our local sausages, which are definitely different to those found elsewhere. Usually somewhere around 80% pork, and then the rest composed of various different foodstuffs (and breadcrumbs/rusks, which is why they're less meaty than a German sausage). Pork and apple, pork and leek, pork and honey and mustard, pork and mozzarella and sundried tomato, are all great combinations.

 

Black pudding can be nice on the side. I've had it with scallops and smoked bacon for a fancy starter, which was very cool.

 

I still think you can't beat a proper English breakfast - sausages, bacon, fried eggs, baked beans, toast, fried mushrooms, black pudding, hash browns (honourary transatlantic invader), fried bread, fried tomatoes, and a large mug of tea on the side. Ah, a heart attack on a plate - not for daily consumption!

 

Alex

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Originally posted by Dr. Sweet Willie:

Fifth, there is hardly anything as marvelous as a truly exceptional marinara sauce -- whether it be on pasta or spread over some eggplant or chicken parmigiana or even on a pizza.

My sauce is indeed fantastic; potentially the best in the world. It is the reason my fiance is marrying me. It contains all fresh ingredients and takes approximately 4 hours to make.

 

I concur with much of what the fine Doctor has written.

 

My daily espresso makes me instantly smile. Black, no sugar, thank you.

 

I will add that a fine wine (do not read as expensive) is one of the great joys of life. I have spent plenty of money on wine and I have rarely regretted any of it.

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Originally posted by getz76:

My sauce is indeed fantastic; potentially the best in the world. It is the reason my fiance is marrying me. It contains all fresh ingredients and takes approximately 4 hours to make.

We need a recipe!

 

Alex

 

P.S. Made fried chicken for the first time this week - very satisfying and solved the horrible temptation from those KFC ads!

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You can see from pics of me, I like food. I would rather be overweight (I'm not on the verge of death or anything)and happy than skinny and sad.

 

I love to cook, as does my wife, and have numerous recepies to share. Maybe someone with some extra room on theier server could host such a page...

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I feel stongly that any meal that begins with a good crock of French onion soup and ends with a good cup of coffee and a chocolate eclair is a good meal. :thu: Regardless of how mediocre the entree.

 

I also share Dr. Willie's opinion of sausage. (There's no way to say that sentence without it sounding wrong.) I have a particular fondness for beer boiled bratwurst on the grill. One of the finest things that the good Lord ever allowed us to create.

 

Oh, one other thing. I don't like to boast, but here I must. I make the best Bolognese sauce this side of the Hudson. I will happily take on any and all challengers. :D

Push the button Frank.
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Originally posted by Dr. Sweet Willie:

First of all, I've pretty much come to the conclusion that sausage may be the perfect food.

you may be right.

Dr. Sweet Willie goes on to say:

Eggs and cheese are a great match made all the better by a healthy dose of hot sauce.

while i may spend a minute debating with myself on the proper breakfast meat, the egg and cheese and [breakfast meat] sammich with hot sauce is an ace staple. india pep is a good option.

 

Dr. Sweet Willie continues:Also, my wife makes a great orange roughy
sounds dirty. i thought this was a family show...

 

Dr. Sweet Willie continues:Spinach and garlic sauteed lightly in olive oil is a simple yet delightful accompaniment to many meals.
try it with sesame oil.

 

jeremyc voiced dismay over doctors orders to watch his digestion. two words for you: rabbit. it's the easies meat to digest. and it's damn tasty. and it's fun to serve. i love the looks on the guests faces when you tell them what they just ate. really separates the men from the boys.

 

being that our noble topic starter had recently spent considerable time in the windy city i'll hold off on the pizza debate.

 

but what cannot be disputed is the chicken wing's iron fisted reign over the snacking world.

 

speaking of fat and happy, whenever you're at one of those great big italian street festivals that we new yorkers enjoy every summer you must have two things: zeppoli and a sausauge and peppers sandwich or two. word of advice on the sausage, buy it from the fattest, greasiest looking man that you would never envision ever buying food from. that man knows his sausage.

Eeeeeehhhhhhhhh.
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Originally posted by kenfxj:

I have a particular fondness for beer boiled bratwurst on the grill. One of the finest things that the good Lord ever allowed us to create.

You will indeed need to attend the upcoming Sweet Willie's Bass, Beer, and Brats Fest, Parte Deux up the road in NJ this summer. I make a fine beer-boiled brat -- boiled in beer, butter, and onions.

 

Originally posted by kenfxj:

Oh, one other thing. I don't like to boast, but here I must. I make the best Bolognese sauce this side of the Hudson. I will happily take on any and all challengers. :D

Perhaps the event will need to be re-titled and you can contribute: Sweet Willie's Second Annual Bass, Beer, Brats, and Bolognese Fest!

 

And, Ace knows his hot stuff. He makes an excellent peach salsa and a mean pot o' chili.

 

Peace.

--SW

 

PS: I also enjoy munching my way through a platter of assorted Italian meats -- prosciutto, capiciola, salami, etc.

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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Originally posted by Ace Cracker:

being that our noble topic starter had recently spent considerable time in the windy city i'll hold off on the pizza debate.

 

I have eaten lots of Chicago pizza. I have eaten lots of New York (and not-to-be-overlooked New Jersey) pizza.

 

Both styles are laudable. Both are enjoyable.

 

I favor the east coast style personally, but I fully understand the pride Chicagoans take in their stuffed and pan pizzas. A stuffed sausage and spinach pizza can take you straight to heaven (but make you need a nap before heading out).

 

Peace.

--Doctor Luv

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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Originally posted by Dr. Sweet Willie:

Fourth, I tend not to be much of a fish eater.

Not a fish eater, huh? Too bad for your wife. (just kidding) :D

 

but seriously vegetables are indeed our friends, well put.

 

However, there was a serious oversight: SWEET POTATOES. Sweet potatoes are where it's at, and I and my whole family am/is full blown irish. so spuds of any persuasion are excellenty prepared, but man, sweet potatoes are pure perfection.

 

!!!!!SWEEEEEEEEEEEET POTATOOOOOOOES!!!!!

hmmm...
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Originally posted by Dr. Sweet Willie:

]I have eaten lots of Chicago pizza.

 

A stuffed sausage and spinach pizza can take you straight to heaven (but make you need a nap before heading out).

such is true of my native land's pizza, ever been to Lou Malanatti's? Lou's has the best pizza. perhaps zeronyne would know what i'm talking about being from the area and all.
hmmm...
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Cajun/Creole is a must on my list of favorites, Spicy Thai also.

 

I can't do without hot sauces - if I'm not sweating by the second bite - it ain't hot 'nough.

 

We've got plenty of spicy condiments here in S FLA. Some from the GulfCoast, most from the Carribean. Full of Scotch Bonnet and Habiniero peppers... I've been here 14 years and haven't made it through all that's available.

 

...and that one Thai pepper that looked like a 1 inch cucumber that blistered the inside of my mouth and nearly sent me to the hospital.

 

Heaven and Hell...

 

Jim

Jim

Confirmed RoscoeHead

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I consider myself a pretty good cook so I'm going to post my recipe for Asparagus & Spinach Lasagna. Some of the best Lasagna you will EVER eat!

=================================================

Spinach-Asparagus Lasagna

 

1 pound Frozen Cut Spinach

1/2 Pound Frozen Asparagus

5 cups Basic Red Sauce, recipe follows

1 (15-ounce) container ricotta cheese

2 large eggs

1 cup grated Parmesan

1 pound grated Mozzarella

1/2 teaspoon Creole Seasoning, recipe follows

1/2 teaspoon salt

2 teaspoons chopped fresh parsley

1 teaspoon dried basil

1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper

12 dried (uncooked) lasagna noodles

 

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F.

In a large saucepan, add the Spinach and Asparagus cook until tender over medium heat. Season with salt, pepper, and Creole Seasoning. Add the tomato sauce and simmer for 10 minutes.

In a large bowl fold together the ricotta cheese, eggs, 1/2 cup grated Parmesan, 1/2 cup grated mozzarella, the Creole Seasoning, salt, parsley, basil, and black pepper.

Spread 1 cup of the tomato sauce in the bottom of a 3-quart (13 by 9 by 2-inch) casserole. Lay 3 lasagna noodles lengthwise down the dish. The noodles should not touch one another. Spoon 3/4 cup of the ricotta mixture over the noodles, and spread evenly with a rubber spatula. Sprinkle 1 cup of the mozzarella evenly over the ricotta. Repeat with the remaining ingredients, for a total of 4 layers of noodles. Sprinkle the remaining 1 cup of mozzarella over the top layer of tomato sauce, and top with the remaining 1/2 cup of Parmesan.

Cover the casserole tightly with aluminum foil, and bake, covered, for 1 hour.

Remove the casserole from the oven, and remove the aluminum foil. Return to the oven and bake, uncovered, for 10 minutes.

Remove from the oven and let sit for 10 minutes before serving.

 

Basic Red Sauce:

2 (28-ounce) cans whole peeled tomatoes

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 & 1/2 cups chopped yellow onions (1 medium yellow onion)

1 teaspoon minced garlic (about 2 cloves garlic)

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon dried basil

1/2 teaspoon dried oregano

1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper

2 (15-ounce) cans tomato sauce

3 tablespoons tomato paste

2 cups water

1 teaspoon sugar

 

Place the tomatoes in a large bowl and squeeze to break into small pieces. Set aside.

In a heavy 5-quart pot, heat the olive oil over medium heat. Add the onions, garlic, salt, basil, oregano and black pepper, and cook, stirring, until soft, 5 minutes. Add the tomato sauce, tomato paste, water, sugar and reserved crushed tomatoes, stir well, and bring to a simmer. Lower the heat to medium-low, and simmer uncovered for 45 minutes, stirring occasionally.

Remove from the heat, and use as needed.

Yield: 10 cups (2 1/2 quarts)

 

Creole Seasoning

2 1/2 tablespoons paprika

2 tablespoons salt

2 tablespoons garlic powder

1 tablespoon black pepper

1 tablespoon onion powder

1 tablespoon cayenne pepper

1 tablespoon dried leaf oregano

1 tablespoon dried thyme

 

Combine all ingredients thoroughly and store in an airtight jar or container.

Yield: about 2/3 cup

Tenstrum

 

"Paranoid? Probably. But just because you're paranoid doesn't mean there isn't an invisible demon about to eat your face."

Harry Dresden, Storm Front

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For me, food & geography don't separate very easily. My favorites:

 

Reindeer sausage in Anchorage, Alaska. (If you love sausage, you MUST try reindeer sausage before you die.)

Portuguese sausage in Oahu, Hawaii. (Ditto.)

French dip sandwiches & skin-on fries at the Friendly Duck (or Spout & Toad) in Tacoma, Washington. (I now can eat them nowhere else.)

Green curry at Thai Traditions in Wichita, Kansas. (Believe it or not.)

Hummus shwarma at N & J Bakery in Wichita, Kansas. (Again, it's true.)

Pizza--especially the one with prosciutto, provolone, & garlic--at Zachary's in Tucson, Arizona. (This is hands down my favorite Chicago-style pizza.)

Carne asado burritos at just about any scuzzy dive in Tucson, Arizona.

Fish & chips almost anywhere in the Antipodes.

 

The world is indeed a fine place. :D

 

Mind you, I've recently cut out meat (except seafood), & I eat very little anymore. Not that it's helping me lose weight, mind. :mad:

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Oh, and spaghetti at my mom's place (also in Tucson, Arizona). Our family spent much time in the home of Italian friends in Tacoma, & during that time my mom learned to make (among other things) an absolutely unbelievable sauce. It's the kind of sauce where prep for Sunday dinner begins Saturday morning. It is good.

 

And on top? "Perps"--I've not seen them elsewhere, & am not sure if that's the "real" name, but basically they're large, pan-fried meatballs loaded with herbs & spices. These things have got to be deadly as Al-Qaida, but they are wonderful atop a really good sauce. Haven't had them in years.

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I can't think of much food that I won't eat (with the exception of fast food). I like standard American fare, Mexican, Italian (all regions), Chinese, Japanese (including sushi and sashimi), Thai, Veitnamese, Korean, French. One of my favorite dishes (particularly in the winter) is a Vietnamese soup called Pho Tai...it's a pork broth with noodles and thinly sliced lean beef dropped in raw...it cooks on the way to the table because the broth is so hot. Dump in a little bit of Vietnamese chili sauce (spicy hot!) and some Hoyson sauce, drop in the fresh herbs most Vietnamese restaurants bring to the table...mmmm, it's some good eatin'!

 

To be a former redneck who grew up in a small town with hardly any restaurants, my taste in foods is unusually exotic. :freak:

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

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Originally posted by Dr. Sweet Willie:

I favor the east coast style personally, but I fully understand the pride Chicagoans take in their stuffed and pan pizzas. A stuffed sausage and spinach pizza can take you straight to heaven (but make you need a nap before heading out).

 

Peace.

--Doctor Luv

I've had the distinct pleasure of eating Giordano's Pizza on a couple of student trips to Chicago and even to Orlando.

 

I must say Sweets is right. However, a couple of slices might take you to heaven in a pine box.

 

As far as food, I see that us bass players are fans of the sausage, cheese, cholesterol and coffee set. I fit right in.

 

I make a spinach Alfredo lasagna that really pretty good. I make a dry rubbed brisket I'd put against most smoked barbecue briskets, and I make it in the oven.

 

Here is a healthy cold weather food that comes from Mexico; in fact it is the traditional New Years food. Posole, or hominy stew has many derivations, but here is mine:

 

6 (or more) skinned chicken thighs, bone-in. You MUST use thighs; no other part of the chicken will develop the same stock.

1 resturant sized can of yellow hominy

2 cans diced, stewed tomatoes

2 onions

2 bell peppers

2 jalapenos

3 or more tablespoons ground cumin (I get the seeds and grind in mortar and pestle after roasting)

1 or 2 tablespoons of chili powder

1 or more tablespoons of red pepper flakes.

Salt/Pepper to taste

 

1. Chop and Saute fresh veggies. Remove seeds from jalapenos, and slice in tiny slivers.

2. Braise Chicken thighs on both sides.

3. Open giant can of hominy, drain and rinse (hominy is made with lye, and it tastes fresher if you rinse it off.)

4. Add hominy and tomatoes, plus lots of water...about 2 inches above the food.

5. Bring to a boil, then simmer. During the first 30 minutes, thighs will cause a foam on the top of the stew. Skim that foam.

6. After about three hours, fish out the thighs and debone. Make absolutely certain you retrieve the cartilage caps off the bones...2 per thigh. Chop chicken and add to pot. Add spices.

7. Continue to simmer all day, the longer the better. The hominy will swell and the water level will drop.

 

Serve this with some fresh jalapeno corn bread and a bit of cheddar cheese sprinkled on the top. It is much healthier than a meaty chili, but will warm you to your toes.

 

I got a big pot in the fridge right now.

Yep. I'm the other voice in the head of davebrownbass.
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Originally posted by Dr. Sweet Willie:

Notes for my UK compadres: I will never eat haggis . Member of the sausage family or not, this holds no appeal for me. Blood sausage/black pudding -- yes! I've had this and enjoyed it. Haggis? Nay, good friends!

The only difference I've been able to make out between haggis and meatloaf is that meatloaf has everything ground up first and uses beef rather than pork. Haggis is great! Find a local highland festival and try the haggis with a scotch egg and a good brew. Can't be beat!
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This is what fitness expert and one of the fittest men in history, Jack LaLanne eats:

 

Plenty of water and at least 10 raw vegetables and five pieces of fresh fruit daily.

 

He also eats fish, egg whites, food high in fiber, and swears by his juicer.

 

He eats this every single day of his life. He hasn't had a dessert in over 60 years.

 

I'd rather die.

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Seventh, not food per se, but a really good cup of coffee can change the direction of the day to the better.
Ding, DING!!! Good Doctor!! And Jeremy too!

I do, I believe take it to a new level however. If I go anywhere over night, my Cuisinart coffee maker goes with me. It is the type with a 12 cup glass lined caraffe and it, my grinder and French Roast beans have a nice little backpack they travel in.

I recently went on a 5 day vacation with my new girlfriend and even though she was a bit dubious about taking up valuable luggage space in her Miata wit a kitchen utensil, she quickly saw the wisdom when she awoke to a nice strong cup-a-joe.

"He is to music what Stevie Wonder is to photography." getz76

 

I have nothing nice to say so . . .

 

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i guess i'm the only true vegetarian voice around here. as such, i have largely abandoned american food in favor of the food of other cultures.

 

and that's not to say that meat isn't great. i'm not vegetarian for moral or ethical reasons. i love the taste of bratwurst, though i prefer them straight up. beer boiling ruins the naturally spicy and rich flavor or the world's greatest sausage. i also used to enjoy pork.

 

it wouldn't be detroit without lebanese food. hummus, tabbouli, felafel, mjadra, ghallaba; i love it. there is also a lot of indian food here. i am particularly fond of chole -- chick peas and potatoes in a spicy sauce. i also like lentils masala, mango lassi, and gulab jammuns. gulab jammuns are extremely tasty desserts. the best part about indian food is that it not only is spicy and flavorful in your mouth, you can also feel it being spicy in your stomache. by the time it clears your system, your insides feel clean. it's beautiful.

 

i love tofu. it's so perfect in everything. try frying it. it gets a nice crust and soaks up the flavors of what you're eating. it's what i get instead of meat whenever i eat thai, chinese, or japanese. vietnamese chili sauce is good, but i'm not so down with vietnamese food. i love sushi (the only way i don't stay strictly vegetarian), and for a while i was absolutely addicted to udon noodles.

 

i can also do pretty well with mexican food. detroit has a growing mexicantown downtown. speaking of eggs with hot sauce, try nopalitos: eggs mixed with sauteed onions and cactus, and served with beans, rice, and torillas. i'm a big fan of valentina picante sauce. it's not as much spicy as it is tangy, but it's damn tasty.

 

i also make a fine vegetarian chili with garbanzo and black beans, and an outstanding fresh guacamole. we pretty much try to cook anything that we've enjoyed in a restaurant.

 

robb.

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I've had haggis ... after some "liquid encouragement" and a night of bagpipe music. I'd probably have it again, especially over something unfamiliar like "Rocky Mountain oysters". (Sorry, man, they just don't sound appealing.) And I thought I'd be first to mention Scotch eggs (davio beat me to it); amazingly they serve them in the boondocks around here.

 

Hot sauce. That's a food group by itself, right? After trying all the others I've gone back to Tobasco. (Unless I'm spicing up some Asian food, mind you.)

 

In S. Florida I have fond memories of a Cuban sandwich. Fortunately I have found a suitable substitute in the area. Basically a spicy meat sandwich and quite a treat.

 

Dark chocolate? Coffee? Hot sauce? Have you ever had Aztec hot chocolate? Like a hot peppery hot cocoa.

 

A UP (upper pennisula) treat is the pasty. Meat, some sort of tuber and onions wrapped in a pastry and baked. A little something brought from over the pond by the Cornish that came to mine copper.

 

I agree with the reindeer sausage, although I really fell for the musk ox in Alaska.

 

[i hope the GP crowd doesn't find this thread. We'll never hear the end of it!)

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Alot of sausage lovers I see. I am a pretty open minded person so, whatever floats your boat.

 

Anyway, keeping my figure can suck from time to time, but it is a lifetime habit for me. I love food, but I am able to obstain from what haunts me.

 

I live on Turkey subs, dark chocolate is about the only thing I have limited control over(in the sweet dept.), Peanut butter and Jelly is a constant craving, and a good steak with a bottle of Cab. is a no brainer.

 

Live long and prosper.

"Some people are like "slinkies". They're not really good for anything;

but they still bring a smile to your face when you push them down a

flight of stairs."

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My biggest thing is tea......I think I probably go through a good 15 cups of tea a day. Earl gray. It's the shizzle. It's also my only addiction.

 

I can make a mean breakfast, and I do it whenever I feel like it...I'm not restricted by the am. I sig it with hasbrowns, basted eggs, buttered wheat, turkey bacon, and all the good stuff.

 

A couple of my friends work at a pizzashop and I gotta say a good chicken parmesean sandwich can make my day.....but the xxxl pizzas are nice when you're chillin with friends.

 

I also tend to do bbq's with friends: parks, houses, it's all good.

 

I'm also not a fish person..........i dunno.

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Originally posted by Dr. Sweet Willie:

Originally posted by kenfxj:

I have a particular fondness for beer boiled bratwurst on the grill. One of the finest things that the good Lord ever allowed us to create.

You will indeed need to attend the upcoming Sweet Willie's Bass, Beer, and Brats Fest, Parte Deux up the road in NJ this summer. I make a fine beer-boiled brat -- boiled in beer, butter, and onions.

Damn, that sounds good!
Push the button Frank.
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Here are a few of my favorites....

 

A big bowl of corn flakes with ice cold milk and some fruit

 

A nice bagel with a schmear

 

Fresh roasted almonds unsalted ( my favorites are from a place on Atlantic Ave in Brooklyn..they roast them 4 x per day..amazing)

 

Chips & Salsa ( ace crackers comes to mind)

 

A grilled steak

 

Coffee / tea

 

A Big Mac meal when done right ..White Castle

 

Rice & beans

 

Chocolate covered donut

 

A cold beer

 

A shot of Jamersons before a gig....

 

Charleston Chews...

 

Pizza

www.danielprine.com

 

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Originally posted by plastic_chancellor:

ever been to Lou Malanatti's?

Malnati's is the shiznit. I think they ship worldwide. One could always visit their website to find out for sure.

 

Giordano's does a nice pizza as well.

 

Peace.

--s-uu

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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