Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Berklee online theory class


fingertalkin

Recommended Posts



  • Replies 18
  • Created
  • Last Reply

I'm sure the Berklee class is great but you can get a very good music theory education by spending less money if you're determined enough. I'm sure the books mentioned above are a great start. You can also check HERE for some good lessons and discussion. Don't forget that some of the people on this board are very knowledgable as well as willing to answer questions.

 

Good luck whichever way you go.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Phil W:

Here are the specs and prices

 

That kind of money could buy a lot of private lessons!

Taking our exchange rate into consideration, and the cost of my lessons each week. I could pay for approximately 12 years of private lessons with the cost of the Theory, Harmony and Ear training course.

 

I'm sure it's excellent, but it is expensive.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by EddiePlaysBass:

*Hijacking this thread* Phil, is that a good book for someone with little to no knowledge of theory? Or is a certain level required?

I'm sure Phil will chime in but IMO if you are interested in theory you should buy this book. Some bits of it are very advanced, and unless you are at quite a high level already you probably won't work through it in a oner (I'm not on top of all of it by any means). But the early chapters are accessible (and useful) and you will pretty much have a lifetime resource - you can use it as a reference as well as something to work through.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, don' have much time to type now but the Levine book is truly essential. It's taken me 20+ years of bassplaying before I found it. I have been through lots of books (I love books).

 

The great thing about it is it is written in a straightforward way that all will understand and has transcribed examples from real recordings of all the theoretical ideas. It goes from the most basic intervals, scales and modes to more advanced than most jazz pros.

 

It won't teach you how to read music. My awful reading skills were adequate for it, however. I know not everybody plays jazz, but everybody who wants to improve as a musician had better study jazz.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you are going to spend all that money, you should go to Boston and enroll in the school.

 

Playing music with all the other students at Berklee is as valuable as taking the classes.

 

One of my young friends is going to Harvard and playing in two combos at Berklee (the two schools are very close to each other). His sax playing has improved by leaps and bounds.

 

I believe that our friend Gospel7theZealot who goes to MIT (another nearby school) sometimes jams with Berklee people.

 

There's a joke that if someone says they went to Berklee, you ask if they graduated. If they did, they must not be very good....the good ones meet people and off they go onto their professional careers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by bc:

But the early chapters are accessible

I should probably clarify this as I've misused the word "accessible". I don't mean later chapters are hard to read or understand. But you will need to put in the hours with the material before you know it well enough for it to be useful. The *theory* of, say, the "modes" built from the melodic minor scale is not difficult to understand but I've never put in the time to internalise it properly and make it useful in a playing situation.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry, didn't bother to check out the specifics on the online class. What do you get for it besides (hopefully) knowledge gained? Some college credit? Do you get a certificate, or is it part of a certificate program?

 

As a tangent to what Jeremy pointed out, paper credentials like certificates and degrees don't help you get gigs like they do in other fields, with the exception of teaching. Still, it would be nice to have something for your troubles in case you need a resume builder. Saying you earned a piece of paper is a little stronger than just saying you took a class.

 

If you just want the knowledge, then Luke's 12 years of private lessons are probably a better deal, provided the instructor(s) can provide the same content (and more).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would love to go to a music school. I don't think the wifey and kids would appreciate it to much. I take lessons with an instructor that I think is good, but he is the only one that I have ever been to. All of the lesson givers in the area are full or mainly teach g****r. I started to play the bass late seeing that I am 30. I enjoy it and am happy with my progress, but I want to learn faster. Maybe I am getting ahead of myself, but I like to play.

How do you sign a computer screen?

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If yo think you need more, I would suggest travelling to a quality bass teacher (maybe in a big city) once a month or so (or less). You'll get plenty of stuff to work on. I'm still working on/digesting stuff from my last class over a year ago!

Otherwise, explain your goals to your local teacher and get him to break it down into a few lessons. Also, if you want to learn theory, you could learn it from a good g****r teacher, saxophonist, trumpeter or whatever.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

30 ... still young! ;)

 

I don't think you're getting ahead of yourself. You can talk about your goals with your instructor and see if something can be done, and/or you can check out your local community college to see what they have to offer. (It's often easier working with comm. college than a big university, but sometimes you can get a night class at either one.) You should at least be able to make some contacts with other musicians that way. If the Berklee online thing really appeals to you, I don't think there's anything really wrong with it, it's just not the first choice for some of us.

 

Don't forget to join a local band (if you haven't already), even if all you do is jam in someone's garage. That's a learning experience, too, probably in a more practical and applied way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What are your guys opinions on when one is ready to join a band? I have only been playing for 4 months or so. I'm still learning what notes I'm playing. I could probably hang with a newer guitarist or someone new to another instrument for that matter, but how do you know when you are ready. Or, is joining a group a way to really get things going and making more sense. I guess I am going to find out.

 

My local community college does have music courses, I just have a few scheduling conflicts.

How do you sign a computer screen?

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Go join a band now if you can :thu:

 

Since joining my first band around six months ago, I've learned a great deal - far more than if I had simply been continuing my lessons and playing at home.

 

Not only have I learned a great deal, but I've had a great time, met some really good people, and had a very rewarding part in creating some original music.

 

I can't recommend it highly enough :thu:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...