Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

What to clean/polish a bass with?


Gruuve

Recommended Posts

Hey, the Sunday gig post made me think of something...last time I thought I had my bass nicely polished (while we're off-stage, the instruments sit on stands with lights right on them) but in seeing it sitting on stage, it looked aweful! There was oil from my hand and arm on the body and even some smears on the pick-guard (it's a flame-red Musicman Stingray5 with black pick-guard). I was appalled that my instrument looked so dirty in the light when I actually thought I had it clean!

 

Anyway, any suggestions on what to clean and/or polish the bass with? Ideally, something that won't allow the human oil to adhere to it (don't know if there is such a thing!)

 

L8r,

Dave

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 30
  • Created
  • Last Reply

I like Alembic guitar polish. It does seem to help fingerprints from sticking and if you polish the back of the neck, it makes it feel faster.

 

Any music store stocks several brands of guitar polish. There's nothing wrong with any of them.

 

You could also use lemon oil.

 

Or you could use an automotive product.Meguiar's makes a lot of good polishes. Use one with the lowest number possible unless you want to strip away a layer of your finish.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For a serious cleaning, I like to get out the old car wax. Then follow the wax job with a few spritzes of PRS polish (as Jeremy said, you can use lots of others). The key, imo, is to do the final polish with a really good cloth. I use a Scotch Brite cloth that I buy in the optical dept. at the local Wal Mart.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Like I said: WD40 for all painted or epoxy surfaces (and lemon oil on the board). WD40 can be had for dimes on the dollar compared to guitar-brand products; ironically I still don't de-crud the bass all that often. I do the fingerboard just as often, to be truthful.
.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by jeremy c:

....Meguiar's makes a lot of good polishes. .

I use the mist and wipe meguiar's makes, works pretty well. just use it every now and than 2 keep that shine there 2 blind ppl when am playin outside :rolleyes:

The basses

-'04 MIM Jazz bass black

-'98 Fender American-Deluxe P-bass natural

-Peavey FuryII blue

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have used a cotton flannel cloth for many years, as per Dan Erlewine. However, recently I got a Planet Waves cleaning cloth, the one without chemicals. Seems soft enough, does the job well, and is washable. Perfect.

Oh, and NO chemicals. Ever.

I play the thing, and wipe it down when finished.

Sometimes during play as well, if the gig affords the possibility.

And my basses are clean.

 

Peace,

 

wraub

 

I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anyone know what to do when you let your 4 year old play with your bass, and he puts a small ding in the back of the neck at the 5th fret?

I polish my bass (finish, and hardware) when I change the strings. Right now I'm using Gibson polish, because that's what was in stock 3 years ago. On the hardware I use a special rag SWR provided with my cabinet to polish the grill; I never have though (polished the SWR).

"Start listening to music!".

-Jeremy C

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by 73 P Bass:

Originally posted by greenboy:

http://phinixi.com/~greenboy-/MusicImage/LugPro.jpg

 

Here's the ticket, boys. They look especially fetching on the "toilet-top" Musicman basses. Enjoy.

Is that a lefty strung righty? Hard to tell with the "shower-cap".

"Start listening to music!".

-Jeremy C

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I attended two workshops on setup at BP Live.

 

The first was with Jon Herrera. He was pretty loose about what to use, saying the commercial guitar polishes should be fine. He recommended against regular furniture polish for lacquer/hard finishes. For the fretboard, he suggested boiled linseed oil or just a cloth. We didn't discuss epoxy/hard surfaces for fretless basses. It was suggested that #0000 steel wool could be used to clean up the board, and he warned that the bits of metal wool would end up in the pickups unless they were covered. His main message was that if you kep up with your instrument, you won't get to the point of needing steel wool (the topic of reconditioning an old bass wasn't the goal).

 

The second workshop was with Joey Lauricella (Fodera) and Anthony Jackson. Jackson was a religious zealot when it comes to care of your instrument. I don't remember what they were using on the body (other than a cotton cloth, even a cotton shirt). Maybe it was standard guitar polish. One point that was made was that fingerprints left on the lacquer will etch into the lacquer over time. If you don't wipe down your instrument often enough, you ruin the finish. This hit me hard, as I have often gone long periods of time without even wiping the body with a dry cloth.

 

For the fretboard, Lauricella advocated light steel wool (cover and protect the rest of the instrument) and mineral oil (like at the drug store). He uses a thin coat, lets it soak in a bit, and wipes it dry. Jackson Qtips in rubbing alcohol to clean the fretboard, followed by lemon oil, and suggested we go to the local home products store and get Formby's, or whatever brand.

 

Leaving BPLive, I had been given guitar polish and a cloth, and new strings. The next night I bought the lemon oil and got to work (in the hotel). I took off the strings, took wet Qtips (alcohol seemed a bit severe to me, and the board wasn't that dirty) and cleaned the board. Then I worked the oil in, and polished the body. After adding the new strings, it felt like a new bass (it's only 2 years old!). Now I keep cloths in the case and wipe it down. I'm converted.

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by jeremy c:

Originally posted by 73 P Bass:

Anyone know what to do when you let your 4 year old play with your bass, and he puts a small ding in the back of the neck at the 5th fret?

What can you do with a kid like that?

Beat on the brat with a baseball bat.

Quinny is much too cute for such bad poetry!

;)

"Start listening to music!".

-Jeremy C

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by greenboy:

It's fun to pull back on a string after aiming and hit the drummer in the eye with a chunk of gooberized effluvia.

Word.

 

Plus, the drummer's seated -- easier target than the damn g****rist, who's jumpin' around like a MF, lookin' cool but sayin' nuthin'...

 

Plus, if you miss the drummer, usually it's 'cause you hit one of her cymbals resulting in a delightful sound effect and some extra wipedown work for her later after the show.

 

"gooberized effluvia" -- I've gotta remember that one for the future.

 

Peace.

--SW

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by jeremy c:

I hope you know that "beat on the brat" is a Ramones song. My favorite Ramones song.

Nope, missed it. I should have guessed though from the jr. high quality of it.

OT here, but my Ramones Fav. is "Chinese Rocks".

I don't think Dee Dee ever worried about cleaning his bass.

"Start listening to music!".

-Jeremy C

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well personally I haved used regular rubbing alcohol for probably the last 20 yrs.

both to clean the strings ( which is where this started, as a way to prolong the life..)

then I noticed how well my cleaning cloth wiped up the smudges and also cleaned the metal finishes as well, Now I wouldn't suggest this for a Vintage instrument with an old Nitrocel. finish, but for anything with a Poly finish it'll be fine & actually most of my basses have had bare rosewood fretboards & I've never seen a problem. this all started from an old B.P. article I believe from Stanley Clarke about him using "Brut" cologne to clean his strings & he said " the smell was a benefit but it was the alcohol that did the work !"

 

:)

I'm Todbass62 on MySpace
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...