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Which Distortion?


Cuahtemoc

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I'm selling my old practice amp so I can get a distortion pedal. At the moment I've tried a Russian Big Muff, a Marshall Guv'nor+, a Bass Overdrive and a Boss DS-1. Personally, I'm just about ready to go and get a big muff - I liked the sound the best. Not as metallic as the boss pedals, the sound is funkier than the Guv'nor+. Before I go and spend the cash though, are there any other pedals I should check out?

 

Oh, and does anyone know of any significant differences between the USA and the Russian big muffs? Thanks.

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Hello, I have some effects , i have a Octave Multiplexer (electro harmonix), 105q bass wah(dunlop), and a Bass overdrive (boss). I know i did'nt answer your question entirely but these are really good effects (for me). I used them a lot so i got my money's worth out of them. My bass playing friends hassle me for haveing effects, they say its better without the effects, but anyway, try some of the effects i mentioned.
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BenLoy might chime in, but the sansamp preamp has a good distortion and it can be chained in with another preamp (which is then controlled by a footswitch) so you effectivly have 2 channels, clean and distorted... now I have never tried it b4 but BenLoy says its got a killer distortion (but the clean doesn't come close to his demeter, but then again what would?)

 

Dave

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Originally posted by KikkyMonk:

.. the sansamp preamp has a good distortion ...

I'll add a bit of support for all the SansAmp products. I'm sure the SansAmp bass driver would be a good purchase. Even the SansAmp g****r products would probably be superior to something like a Big Muff for bass applications. I use a SansAmp GT2 as a distortion pedal in my g****r rig, and it also sounds great when you run bass through it. Tech 21, the company that makes SansAmp products, claims in some of their ads that the original SansAmp guitar pedal has been used on guitars, vocals, basses, keyboards and even drums.
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Originally posted by Addix Metzatricity:

Don't kill me, but I've used an Ibanez Tube Screamer for the last 9 years. It's unique as far as bass distortion goes (probably because it's made for guitar...) and does wonders if you wanna play the feedback game.

I just got the TS7 ToneLok version of this. Sounds close enough to the TS9 reissues, and has a HOT switch. This actually sounds tubey, and in HOT mode, well, it's really hot for an overdrive pedal. Amazingly enough, with my active PJ bass, I can get close to Cliff Burton's Anesthesia (with a Dunlop GCB95 CryBaby wah), and I can do the classic Voivod sound by scooping the mids in HOT mode. In lower gain TS9 mode, I can get a nice tubelike breakup sound without busting the speakers.
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Always liked my ol' Rat pedal (circa 1980) for bass distortion. I also like my Mesa-Boogie V-Twin pedal for that. I have an Ibanez bass distortion, too -- the PD-7. Not bad.

I gave up on pedals, though. Too much hassle.

So, these days I don't use any distortion at all.

Go figure.

\m/

Erik

"To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists of breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting."

--Sun Tzu

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...forgot to mention, I can nail the King's X tone with the TS7 in HOT mode. It's really not a heavy sound, so it's easy to emulate, especially if you play with a hot sounding P bass. Just add enough overdrive to extend the sustain a bit (put the DRIVE at around 2 or 3), TONE at 6 or 7.

 

Then balance it with the clean tone volume (for tonal variety, you won't need the OD all the time), set the Graphic EQ for a slightly scooped tone, then you're in business. Cool songs from those guys. :)

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I'm a bit of an fx addict, started off with a Zoom 506, added a TE dual compressor, then acquired a Boss BE-5B followed by a Crybaby 105Q and now have a huge pedalboard with lots of discrete pedals by a whole variety of manufacturers.

 

When it comes to distortion I'd recommend using separate analogue pedals (though the new Digitech Bass distortion is apparently ok and some of the high-end multi-fx are decent) because that's where you'll get the most tone for your money (especially when you consider resale value - digital depreciates).

 

I use a Sovtek Big Muff for fuzz and it's an awesome pedal though they can be a bit unreliable - if you're capable of using a soldering iron it's worth going over all the connections because I've had dry joint problems in the past but since then it's been flawless.

 

For overdrive/distortion I use a Fulltone Bassdrive which rules! Great vintage tone, utterly reliable and true bypass. Funny thing is though, I prefer the Big Muff - it's so damn funky!

 

One think to watch with discrete non-programmable fx is too many knobs - it's much better to have 2 or 3 easy repeatable settings than have 20 different sounds which are hard to find in gig situations - I sometimes think I'd like a blend control and noisegate on the Muff but in the end that would just overcomplicate matters. Beware pedals with more than 4 knobs unless you intend to only use them in the studio.

 

Alex

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Originally posted by C.Alexander Claber:

Beware pedals with more than 4 knobs unless you intend to only use them in the studio.

 

Alex

Sometimes, though, you do need the extra knobs effects. Take my Metal Zone, for instance. It's got level, gain (dist), low, high, mid, and a mid parametric control. The flexible midrange is what makes it so useful as an effect. If it didn't have that, the thing might be just another metal pedal. Just my $0.02
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