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How to identify an acid .wav file?


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Is there a way to know if a .wav file has been acidized?I have a bunch of wave files and some are already acidized and I just wanna know which ones are.

 

Is there a little software or tools that can do that?

 

Or is there a way to like, right click/properties, and it says that it's an acid loop?

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Acidized wave files, now that's something new to me. I'm going to have to reseach that. What's the advantage? Or, is it some way to copyright protect a file?

bbach

 

Beauty is in the eye of the beer holder.

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Acidized wave files, now that's something new to me. I'm going to have to reseach that. What's the advantage? Or, is it some way to copyright protect a file?
Acidized wav files contain tempo and key information that can be modified by Acid and a number of DAWs.

 

A wave file is a collection of a number of different types of chunks. there is a required format ("fmt") chunk which contains important parameters describing the waveform, such as its sample rate. The data chunk, which contains the actual waveform data, is also required. all other chunks are optional. Among the other optional chunks are ones which define cue points, list instrument parameters, store application-specific information, etc. All of these chunks are described in detail in the following sections of this document.

 

All applications that use wave must be able to read the 2 required chunks and can choose to selectively ignore the optional chunks. A program that copies a wave should copy all of the chunks in the wave, even those it chooses not to interpret.

 

There are no restrictions upon the order of the chunks within a wave file, with the exception that the format chunk must precede the data chunk. Some inflexibly written programs expect the format chunk as the first chunk (after the riff header) although they shouldn't because the specification doesn't require this.

Short of opening a program that reads the extra chunks, I haven't found a way to determine whether a file is acidized or not.
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this gets close to a question that has been bugging me lately. I have been looking for a parser that extracts the RIFF chunks so that they could be manipulated into an external database. Has anyone ever run across such a thing?

 

RIFF chunk

RIFF files are built out of units called "chunks." A chunk has three parts: an identifying tag, a 4-byte integer that defines the size of the chunk, and a block of data whose nature depends on the tag. RIFF tags are simply strings of four characters with no terminating null. Two chunk types, RIFF and LIST, can contain subchunks. These also include a 4-byte form-type field. The RIFF chunk is the container for the whole file, and its form-type field identifies the filefor example, WAVE for a WAV audio file and ACON for an animated cursor. A LIST chunk's form-type field identifies the list's contents.

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I wish I had a better answer for you, but the easiest way for me to tell is to drag it into Sonar and see if the clip has rounded edges instead of square ones. Of course, the documentation should say something but I've had "acidized" sample CDs where, incredibly, the files were not acidized.

 

I did try checking the file's Properties, but it's the same as for a standard WAV file.

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