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All Around Quality Budget Condensor Mic - Is there such a thing?


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I'm looking to expand my sound and incorporate vocals and guitars into my electronic pieces. Basically looking for a multi-purpose mic to record acoustic guitars, vocals, and my dirty guitar amp. Terrible sound in my apartment, but I have a spare closet that may serve as a pseudo-iso booth. If it makes a difference, it'll be run into an M-Audiobuddy Pre (laugh if you will, but it serves my purposes and budget). Any "real-life" testimonials would be appreciated.
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I've got a Chinese 1 mic and although it made a great first impression, as I've lived with it I find myself using it less and less. Even though the high end is pretty good, it always had this sort of plastic sound to the mids that I grew to hate. Also has a bump at around 500 Hz that's fatiguing.

 

For the same money, I'd definitely recommend the AKG C-2000. It's got a great bass roll off that lets you work it close for the intimate sound, and without the roll off, it is a great all purpose mic. It's got a bump in the over 10K highs like the C-1, but it's way more accurate in the mids to my ear.

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I've gotten quality results with the Rode NT-1 on various sources, especially vocals. I usually throw the Shure or Audio Technica on the amps. I've heard great things, too, about the SP C1, and SP mics in general. Both are great mics and great values, so I don't think you can go wrong with either.

Peace

If at first you don't succeed, keep on sucking 'til you do suck seed!
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The best cheap large diaphragm condenser I've heard so far is a Rode NTK tube condenser, which sells for under US$600, I believe. That mic sounds very good, and really, sounds very good at just about any price. I don't own one, but I did a recording with one, and was impressed. I was then floored when I found out that the person had paid scarcely more than US$500 for it.

 

If you want cheaper than that, I've heard that the Oktavas or the Marshall large diaphragm condensers are very good bets.

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Originally posted by Ken/Eleven Shadows:

The best cheap large diaphragm condenser I've heard so far is a Rode NTK tube condenser, which sells for under US$600, I believe. That mic sounds very good, and really, sounds very good at just about any price. I don't own one, but I did a recording with one, and was impressed. I was then floored when I found out that the person had paid scarcely more than US$500 for it.

 

If you want cheaper than that, I've heard that the Oktavas or the Marshall large diaphragm condensers are very good bets.

I have an NTK and don't find it very versatile.

 

I have heard many great things about 4050's and Shure KSM-44's

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Originally posted by halljams:

Originally posted by Ken/Eleven Shadows:

The best cheap large diaphragm condenser I've heard so far is a Rode NTK tube condenser, which sells for under US$600, I believe. That mic sounds very good, and really, sounds very good at just about any price. I don't own one, but I did a recording with one, and was impressed. I was then floored when I found out that the person had paid scarcely more than US$500 for it.

I have an NTK and don't find it very versatile.

 

I have heard many great things about 4050's and Shure KSM-44's

Both are supposed to be nice but I haven't done any recording with either.

 

I did one recording with the NTK so far as a musician. I have hardly put it through its paces, though. We used it as an omni mic to pick up an improvisation in the room, and it sounded very impressive.

 

Out of curiosity, why did you not find it versatile?

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Originally posted by halljams:

Originally posted by Ken/Eleven Shadows:

The best cheap large diaphragm condenser I've heard so far is a Rode NTK tube condenser, which sells for under US$600, I believe. That mic sounds very good, and really, sounds very good at just about any price. I don't own one, but I did a recording with one, and was impressed. I was then floored when I found out that the person had paid scarcely more than US$500 for it.

 

If you want cheaper than that, I've heard that the Oktavas or the Marshall large diaphragm condensers are very good bets.

I have an NTK and don't find it very versatile.

 

I have heard many great things about 4050's and Shure KSM-44's

We have 2 NTK's and find them amazingly versatile. Combined with a 57 they create huge heavy guitars, are superb for acoustics, and amazing on vocals. It's the perfect room mic for drums, fantastic on reeds, percussion, infact I' ve yet to find an instrument it doesn't sound great on.

Hope this is helpful.

 

NP Recording Studios

Analog approach to digital recording.

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Originally posted by Ken/Eleven Shadows:

Out of curiosity, why did you not find it versatile?

I guess it works ok on most things but it seems like there are better options usually.

I don't know if they upgraded it, but mine is only cardiod.

For acoustics at the body i find it ok but i prefer the royer heads and tails, it's better at the neck.

For electrics i find it wayyyy bright.

I like it ok on percussion, i find the transients are too smeared for some drum sounds and i wayyy prefer the oktava mc-012's for overheads.

The sizzle on the top is annoying on some vocals.

But it does occasionally work very well for vox.

 

I guess i am just developing my own taste for things and i like it less and less lately.

I prefer to get the grit from my tube pre amps.

 

I have gotten some smokin nasty dirty vox with the ntk through the tubes, i dug that alot.

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Originally posted by halljams:

Originally posted by Ken/Eleven Shadows:

Out of curiosity, why did you not find it versatile?

I guess it works ok on most things but it seems like there are better options usually.

I don't know if they upgraded it, but mine is only cardiod.

For acoustics at the body i find it ok but i prefer the royer heads and tails, it's better at the neck.

For electrics i find it wayyyy bright.

I like it ok on percussion, i find the transients are too smeared for some drum sounds and i wayyy prefer the oktava mc-012's for overheads.

The sizzle on the top is annoying on some vocals.

But it does occasionally work very well for vox.

 

I guess i am just developing my own taste for things and i like it less and less lately.

I prefer to get the grit from my tube pre amps.

 

I have gotten some smokin nasty dirty vox with the ntk through the tubes, i dug that alot.

Thanks for the reply, as always. Now I'm wondering if I am getting something confused, because the person recording told me that the Rode was a tube mic and was in omni mode, but I quick check on several other web sites confirms (as you say) that the mic is indeed cardioid. Maybe we used another mic? Whatever it was, we used it as a room mic and it sounded good.
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Originally posted by henryrobinett:

I keep hearing the best all around budget condensor is the SP B1. $79. I also am a fan of the Oktava MK-012s. I own four. I also love the AT4050. Got a couple.

I think it was Mr. Mitch Gallagher that gave the B1 a really good review.

Peace

If at first you don't succeed, keep on sucking 'til you do suck seed!
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Originally posted by halljams:

Originally posted by Ken/Eleven Shadows:

Out of curiosity, why did you not find it versatile?

I guess it works ok on most things but it seems like there are better options usually.

I don't know if they upgraded it, but mine is only cardiod.

For acoustics at the body i find it ok but i prefer the royer heads and tails, it's better at the neck.

For electrics i find it wayyyy bright.

I like it ok on percussion, i find the transients are too smeared for some drum sounds and i wayyy prefer the oktava mc-012's for overheads.

The sizzle on the top is annoying on some vocals.

But it does occasionally work very well for vox.

 

I guess i am just developing my own taste for things and i like it less and less lately.

I prefer to get the grit from my tube pre amps.

 

I have gotten some smokin nasty dirty vox with the ntk through the tubes, i dug that alot.

The NTK is czardiod only.

 

for smoother vocals with the NTK (or any vocal mic for that matter) position the mic so the singer is singing over, rather than into or up to the mic. Not only will this yield a warmer tone, it give the singer a more natural singing position. the typical in the studio shot of the vocalist looking up towards a mic singing is the worst position to sing in. It restricts airflow because of the angle of the neck, which puts pressure on the esaphagus. The "Elvis pose" as it is often refered to, is the body's best position for maximum airflow and poser from the diaphram.

 

same goes for acoustics and overheads/room mics. Keep the mic either slightly above or below the neck, and mroe centered on the kit. For a room mic keep it below the cymbals.

Hope this is helpful.

 

NP Recording Studios

Analog approach to digital recording.

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