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Which type of guitar strings?


garywilson456

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Hi, Gary. Is your acoustic guitar a steel-string, flat-top type? Or a nylon-string, classical?

 

What kind(s) of music do you like to play on your guitar?

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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What's hard Gary, is some of us may not wish to foist OUR personal preferrences on you as it might turn out OUR preferrences aren't to your tastes.

 

All any of us can do is offer suggestions. So, I hope the following helps...

 

For years I "tortured" myself using "medium" guage strings( Black Diamond brand) because I thought i was SUPPOSED to.

 

And over the years, as my old "balsa wood" (not really, but MY humorous referrence to it) guitar got replaced by a better instrument, I still used medium guage GIBSON strings( because mine is an Epiphone).

 

But there was a period, while muddling through a divorce and other personal problems that I left my guitar alone for too long a time, and it needed some repair and adjustment. The repair tech then put on a new set of GHS "light guage" "Phosfor Bronze" strings that I thought were just fine.

 

But eventually, I found the "light" strings to rubber-band like for my taste, and didn't know if I wished to return to the MEDIUM strings. It was about that time, from I don't know WHERE, I recieved a coupon in the mail for a FREE SET of a new guitar string made by a company called ELIXIR. Supposedly coated with some sort of material, they were supposed to eliminate that "squeak" you get from moving your fingers along the strings when playing. I didn't care about THAT, it was the FREE part that attracted me. And I tried out a set of "Medium/light" strings by ELIXIR and have been using them ever since. They're constructed such as the need to change them isn't as frequent as with other strings, so the slightly higher price IS still somewhat of a bargain.

 

I found the "medium/light" guage, while still "stiff" enough to build your callusses accordingly, still offer an "easier on the fingers" way to go. And, they do sound rather nice.

 

Good luck and welcome to the boards. :)

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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Hello,

I just want to know that which type of guitar string is better for beginner guitarists because I have an acoustic guitar, but I am thinking to change the strings of my guitar. So please give some suggestion.

 

Thanks

 

welcome aboard, to answer your question is hard because i have no info on your guitars setup and gauge of strings. what i like for strings may not work for you.

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Since you're a beginner, make sure you have an experienced guy around to help you out. If it was mine, I would take to my guitar man and have him check the gauge and replace the stings with the same gauge. That way you can avoid truss rod and other adjustments. If you haven't had a set up on the guitar, it may be worth $60 bucks to you to have it set up right. The set up man will change the strings for you included in the set up price (except you will be charged for the new strings). They will show you how to change the strings when you tackle it on your own in the future. There are a couple of tricks like making sure the pin stays on the ball when pushing it down in to the hole and how to wrap the strings on the headstock tuning machines so that they will stay in tune...Good luck and have fun with it! :cool:

 

ps. which type of strings, I like D'Addario but just about any brand will do depending on your pocket book...

Take care, Larryz
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Can't be sure,, Larry, but it sort of sounds like the OP is considering CHANGING the guage of string he uses.

 

Like perhaps he just accquired the guitar, bought(or otherwise accquired) it used, and it's in need of new strings.

 

Also, like he may NOT know anyone with enough experience to help him out, so he came here LOOKING for it. He may also think a certain guage is preferrable for beginners to use, which may or not be so...as I'D suggest he plow ahead and get accustomed to the guage already ON the guitar, and have them changed to the same guage; but the tech in some stores is also an instructor( the tech at Marshall's in Allen Park, MI wore both hats, too.)and HE can also advise.

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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That's why I suggested he take it to a tech as having the guitar set up properly is more important than the string brand or gauge. If you go too light on an acoustic, you might have to have a truss rod adjustment as the relief is sometimes gone and the frets start buzzing. If you go to heavy you may also need a trust rod adjustment, as you might cause some extra relief and the guitar will be hard to play. These things do not always happen but it is hard (even for this old dude and I use a tech when needed) to get the intonation correct on an acoustic with no adjustable bridge.

 

+1 I know people come here for answers and they usually get some great ones from our forumites. Without seeing the guitar in question, it's hard to give advice to someone starting out, without some clarification...My answer: There is no special type of guitar strings for a beginner on an acoustic guitar, after the set up, try to use the same gauge when making future changes... :cool:

Take care, Larryz
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The best WE can do is to try and guide him AWAY from what we(some of us) might feel are "just lousy strings".

 

@Larry: Funny you mentioned an adjustable bridge. My old Epiphone FT-145 HAS(rather, HAD)an adjustable bridge, but that feature wore itself out years ago! Two bolts on either side of the bridge, adjustable with a "flathead" screwdriver. Over time, both the occasional turning of them for adjustment, and the pressure of the strings over the saddle, had "drilled" them into the bridge as to where adjustments can no longer be made.

 

I suppose an expensive repair can make it work as it should again. But as the "action" is where I like it( The bridge saddle, once too low, was brought up to where I like it by using "shims" of thin veneer pulled off of another peice of wood from somewhere.) I see no need for it. Not YET, anyway.

 

But Guitarzan and you, and me and others, HAD pointed out to the OP that more would be needed to be known of the guitar, player and other factors for a fully comprehensive suggestion.

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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I've only had (and still have) one acoustic 1972 Fender guitar with an adjustable bridge. It sounds like the same bridge design as your Epi Fang. I could never get the screws to stop rattling and would just shove an extra pick under the bottom one. I thought it was a great feature, but it never caught on and you seldom see acoustics with that kind of bridge...Mine cracked, it still plays, but I haven't fooled with the adjustment for many decades...so that's probably why it never caught on. Once the bridge saddle is set up correctly, you rarely have to change it. Unless you deviate to far with the string gauges...

 

On the electrics with adjustable bridge and saddles, it's fairly easy to set the string height and intonation when changing string gauges...

 

 

 

 

Take care, Larryz
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Hi

Well besides the gauge (thickness) of your strings, some strings are made of different material than others. For a beginner, my question is not about your guitar but about you. Are you okay about experimenting with different things, or do you want to choose one thing and then not worry about it? If you want to `set it and forget it`, start with medium gauge, but if you play with a very light touch light strings may be an option. A lot of people have spoken about the tone of heavy strings but so far I`m not tempted. I like to do subtle things with string movement.

Anyway here`s a string primer from, well you know-the oracle haha:

http://www.guitarplayer.com/miscellaneous/1139/5-things-about-strings/12570

Same old surprises, brand new cliches-

 

Skipsounds on Soundclick:

www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandid=602491

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Gary, I'm not sure if I'm understanding you correctly. Are you saying that playing chords on an electric guitar is easier and learning to play chords on an acoustic guitar will take a little longer?
Take care, Larryz
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I THINK they're referring to the electric guitar having "lighter" strings, AND better "action" than most acoustics. I'd tend to agree with that, but would also hesitate to recommend it as a learning tool.

 

If your DESIRE is to play acoustic almost, or actually EXCLUSIVELY, Then you're going to HAVE to deal with playing acoustic eventually, so why NOT start off on that foot? In fact, I'd suggest, if playing ELECTRIC is your aim, learning on the more "difficult" and "harder" acoustic would make you BETTER on electric. But, it looks as if you've already figured it out.

 

PLUS, there ARE no chords you play on an electric that you CAN'T play on an acoustic!

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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Hi Larryz, I just want to say that most of my friends said that electric guitar or electric chords are easier than acoustic guitar but it's good if you try to start with an acoustic guitar and its chords.

 

OK, I get it now Gary...I would agree with what Fang and your friends are saying (i.e. in most cases electric guitars are easier to play with lower actions and lighter string gauges than acoustics). I would think about what genre you are interested in and go with whichever guitar fits in the best...good luck and have fun with it! :cool:

Take care, Larryz
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OK, I get it now Gary...I would agree with what Fang and your friends are saying (i.e. in most cases electric guitars are easier to play with lower actions and lighter string gauges than acoustics). I would think about what genre you are interested in and go with whichever guitar fits in the best...good luck and have fun with it! :cool:

 

Thanks Larry I will definitely going to learn electric guitar, but now I recently purchase a new acoustic guitar and that's why I am thinking to learn acoustic guitar.

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Oh really, but I thought that we can use the electric guitar strings on the acoustic guitar and also many people suggest me that too.

 

???really?

 

no, sorry-my suggestion is DON`T do that. Electric guitar strings are built to sound good through an amplified electric guitar. They will not sound as good on an acoustic guitar. Get acoustic guitar strings. they won`t be so much more difficult to play and your guitar will sound better.

Same old surprises, brand new cliches-

 

Skipsounds on Soundclick:

www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandid=602491

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Oh really, but I thought that we can use the electric guitar strings on the acoustic guitar and also many people suggest me that too.

 

???really?

 

no, sorry-my suggestion is DON`T do that. Electric guitar strings are built to sound good through an amplified electric guitar. They will not sound as good on an acoustic guitar. Get acoustic guitar strings. they won`t be so much more difficult to play and your guitar will sound better.

 

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/EB2568 <---I would give these new 11-52 aluminum Ernie Balls a try. They are getting good reviews and are reasonably priced. The manufacturer claims they resist corrosion. +1 on Skips advice. There are some players that do violate the rules and use electric strings on acoustic guitars to avoid string squeak but they stick to the same gauge as the acoustic strings so there is no advantage as to ease of playing...the acoustic strings will sound better plugged in or unplugged...

 

ps. Just to prove that I would give them a try, I just ordered two sets...if they do not please me, I'll report back LOL! :cool:

Take care, Larryz
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:D:D:D!

 

I also knew a guy who put ACOUSTIC STRINGS on his electric thinking it would make it SOUND more ACOUSTIC!

 

*sigh*----Like I once asked---

 

Who ARE these people, and HOW do they keep finding ME?

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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???really?

 

no, sorry-my suggestion is DON`T do that. Electric guitar strings are built to sound good through an amplified electric guitar. They will not sound as good on an acoustic guitar. Get acoustic guitar strings. they won`t be so much more difficult to play and your guitar will sound better.

 

So, should I choose different brand of guitar string or the same brand guitar string is much more better.

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Please do. Working with aluminum in an auto plant proved to be a dicey undertaking.

 

Aluminum body parts(hoods, trunk lids and doors) just didn't hold up and were difficult to work with. Aluminum engine blocks were tricky, too.

 

Plus I'm questioning the sound.

 

Aluminum seemed like such a "dead" metal to me, sort of like LEAD, only LIGHT! But just as pliable and soft. Seems an odd choice for guitar strings. It's got MY curiosity piqued!

Whitefang

I started out with NOTHING...and I still have most of it left!
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The reviews look very good, so I'll give them a try. Ernie Ball has been around forever and they probably put them to the test before putting them on the market...I was never really a fan of Ernie's strings, but what the heck, I can always go back to D'Addarios...
Take care, Larryz
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???really?

 

no, sorry-my suggestion is DON`T do that. Electric guitar strings are built to sound good through an amplified electric guitar. They will not sound as good on an acoustic guitar. Get acoustic guitar strings. they won`t be so much more difficult to play and your guitar will sound better.

 

So, should I choose different brand of guitar string or the same brand guitar string is much more better.

 

Hi-well actually, did you say what brand of string you have now? personally I think the gauge is much more impotant than the brand. Anyway ernie Ball, D`addario (I probably spelled that wrong-whatever) and DR are all good.

Same old surprises, brand new cliches-

 

Skipsounds on Soundclick:

www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandid=602491

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I received the Ernie Ball Aluminum Bronze strings yesterday and threw them on my Takamine acoustic last night. I tried them last night acoustically and then put them through the amp this afternoon. The gauge is 11-52 (11 15 22w 30w 42w 52w). My fretting fingers didn't turn black as bad as they do with Phosphor Bronze strings. The Aluminum "provides added resistance to acids, sweat and string contaminants" (i.e. BBQ Spare Ribs LOL!). Anyway they stretched in within about an hour and a half of play time. The intonation stayed right dead on. The volume acoustically was very good and on the amp they really brought the Takamine (top of the line) electronics to life. Very nice acoustic lows, mids and high tones...

 

They do squeak about the same as any uncoated acoustic string which is not that bad (unless you've been playing jazz on flat wounds for awhile on my other guitars, then any string sounds noisy to me).

 

I was at a guitar store this after noon and picked up a few Taylors for comparison. Taylors come with Elixir Nano Web coated strings. The Elixers cost a lot more $7 Ernie Ball vs $14 Elixir +/-. I think the uncoated Ernie Balls will last as long or longer as the Elixirs, which is pretty good considering that "long lasting strings", is the big advertised draw on coated strings. The Ernie Balls have a little more volume unplugged. However, the Elixirs had a little less string squeak and were much easier on the fingers as far as comfort goes and sounded just as good once the guitars were plugged in.

 

@ Gary, I'll probably go back to the Elixirs again, next time I change strings as they just feel better and are not as hard on the fingers. But, I'm leaving the EB's on for awhile to see how well they hold up. Sometimes new strings will quiet down on the squeaking after a little more wear...we'll see.

 

@ Fang, I think the Aluminum is going to work out well as an alloy for guitar strings as the strings sound great. I know houses wired with Aluminum had major problems and it is a pretty soft metal when it comes to car parts. I know of some old jeepers that liked the V6 aluminum blocks when rebuilding the old Willys though... :cool:

 

 

 

 

Take care, Larryz
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