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I Want You (She's So Heavy) bass part


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THIS is a bit of a disillusionment for me. I love this song and bass line, always have. But taken out of the context of the song, wow, what a crapola performance! Some the little in-between licks are so ridiculous they made me laugh, the timing is sloppy in places, and I think the low E string is out of tune! Not to mention, that is one of the least appealing bass tones I've ever heard. Even more amazing is how good it sounds in context with with the song. I wonder if that is due to George Martin's mixing, or just the rest of the instruments masking the parts I'm talking about?

After seeing the rehearsal sessions in the Let It Be film, I said "if the Beatles can all sound that bad, there's hope for me!" After hearing this, I'm saying that again.

Always remember that you�re unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

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THIS is a bit of a disillusionment for me. I love this song and bass line, always have. But taken out of the context of the song, wow, what a crapola performance! Some the little in-between licks are so ridiculous they made me laugh, the timing is sloppy in places, and I think the low E string is out of tune! Not to mention, that is one of the least appealing bass tones I've ever heard. Even more amazing is how good it sounds in context with with the song. I wonder if that is due to George Martin's mixing, or just the rest of the instruments masking the parts I'm talking about?

After seeing the rehearsal sessions in the Let It Be film, I said "if the Beatles can all sound that bad, there's hope for me!" After hearing this, I'm saying that again.

 

Yeah, except that it all works and sounds great because they know how to blend tones, they're incredibly talented, are amazing composers and understand melody, harmony and commercial appeal far beyond most everyone. You may want to take that into account the next time you compare yourself to them. : )

JAZZ UN-STANDARDS http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vE4FoJ4Cr4&feature=related

 

DON'T FEAR...THE REVERB! 60's Instrumentals with MORE BASS!

 

 

 

 

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THIS is a bit of a disillusionment for me. I love this song and bass line, always have. But taken out of the context of the song, wow, what a crapola performance! Some the little in-between licks are so ridiculous they made me laugh, the timing is sloppy in places, and I think the low E string is out of tune! Not to mention, that is one of the least appealing bass tones I've ever heard. Even more amazing is how good it sounds in context with with the song. I wonder if that is due to George Martin's mixing, or just the rest of the instruments masking the parts I'm talking about?

After seeing the rehearsal sessions in the Let It Be film, I said "if the Beatles can all sound that bad, there's hope for me!" After hearing this, I'm saying that again.

 

Yeah, except that it all works and sounds great because they know how to blend tones, they're incredibly talented, are amazing composers and understand melody, harmony and commercial appeal far beyond most everyone. You may want to take that into account the next time you compare yourself to them. : ) Seriously, I think it's just all from a time where little inconsistences weren't as big a deal. Then again, they had great songs. That helps too.

JAZZ UN-STANDARDS http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vE4FoJ4Cr4&feature=related

 

DON'T FEAR...THE REVERB! 60's Instrumentals with MORE BASS!

 

 

 

 

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Sounds like a short scale Hofner to me. You know it's funny I've heard a lot of isolated tracks from a number of people and they all for the most part sound a little unimpressive. Even some of Jamersons lines. These weren't meant to be solo pieces though. You hear them with the song and thats when the genius of these lines and the the mastery of the engineering shines! One piece of a puzzle is unremarkable but you add the rest and you have the complete picture. Same thing.

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I just listened to it--one of my favorite lines--and I don't really understand your visceral reaction. Is it perfect? No, but so what? It's like criticizing Jackson Pollock because he spilled a few drops of paint.

 

Haven't you ever heard an isolated vocal track and thought it was a little off? The line isn't a bass solo, it's supposed to be heard in the context of the mix and the song. I think it works great.

"Everyone wants to change the world, but no one thinks of changing themselves." Leo Tolstoy
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The backstory I've heard surrounding "I want you" is that it was one of the songs that came from the Let it Be sessions, but it didn't make the album. The Beatles had been rehearsing the song along with a couple of others from Abbey Road like "Octopus's Garden" and "Oh Darling" which you can see in the Let it Be film. Ultimately that album was nearly abandoned, but Phil Spector was brought in with the hopes of resurrecting that record which would later be released after Abbey Road.

 

For pretty much all of the Let it Be sessions McCartney was playing the Hofner when he played bass, even though you can see his Rick in the background in some shots. The Hofner was somewhat notorious for having intonation issues, and it's very likely the bass that Macca used to record "I want you".

 

For the most part, the groove and riff are easy to play. But the fills are pretty insane. I honestly don't think the bass part would hold up well to being soloed. It works really well in the context of the track though. And that's what recording is ultimately about: where does the bass sit in the mix, and how does it work in the context of the overall arrangement?

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I've always thought of this song as intentionally gritty and kind-of sloppy anyway. It's like they worked hard to make it sound like they just threw it together. Or maybe they did just throw it together...

 

But the fills are pretty insane.

Agreed. That's Mr. McCartney for you.

"Of all the world's bassists, I'm one of them!" - Lug
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Hey Plangent, ease up, buddy, we got it the first time. You're a troll who enjoys condescending to others. No need to belabor the obvious with repetition, intended or otherwise.

Always remember that you�re unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

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most people don't realize the influence George Martin had on Paul McCartney's sound. His trick was to mix Paul in through a early tube DI unit onto the outer tape tracks and to pan him away from the center.

 

I confess I haven't listed to "IWY(SSH)" in awhile (and it's probably time to replace those old CDs) so I can't really attest to how Martin mixed the bass on this track.

 

PS: Waters' comment helped me to recall the first 7-8 minutes of the "Rush: Time Machine" DVD. I really enjoyed all the variations they did on "Spirit of Radio" from polka throuh disco, country and rap. They're definitely the Three Stooges of rock!

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I think Geoff Emerick had a much greater influence on McCartney's bass sound than George Martin. I don't believe DI was used very much outside of the Pepper record. Since they mostly used 4 track during the majority of their career I'm not sure about recording to the 'outside' tracks and I don't know how much panning is used when mixing to mono-the standard they used until Abbey Road.

 

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