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music reading ?


noto

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there is an article that im reading with a music Ex. and at the beginning at the top of the Ex.it hashttp://www.playbassonline.com/images/Halfnote.jpg = 100-132

and the music is written in eighth notes

 

can you explain how this is transferred to the metronome . thx

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That particular indication is that a 1/2 note equals 100 to 132 beats per minute, right ?

No matter what the meter or time signature one 1/2 note equals 4 1/8th notes, so each 1/8th note would equal 25 ~ 33 beats per minute.

Presuming that the music is 4/4, this is 50~66 bpm.

If it's in 2/4, 100~132 bpm...

...but the main thing is, if it's mostly 1/8th notes, set the metronomme to the pulse mentioned above (1/8 note = 25~33 bpm) & play an 1/8 note per eack click.

 

After ya get that down, try this exercise: reset the click to 50~66 & try counting each click as 1/4 note; that wsorta thing will help develop your unconscious counting feel.

d=halfnote
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thx for your reply , i very much appreciate it.

 

but what i really don't understand is the reason for

the different ( note = whatever bpm ) in these examples of the articles Im

reading .

 

because usually for the bpm i am use to seeing(moderate = 115 bpm , Etc )instead of a note symbol and i don't know if im playing the Ex. at the right speed .

 

your explanation is probably great, i just don't understand it yet.

 

 

 

 

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Yhup, in that case,

 

http://www.playbassonline.com/images/Halfnote.jpg = 100-132 beats per minute tempo.

 

Usually, tempo is most often expressed in quarter-notes, particularly for musical-pieces written in 4/4 time, where the first "4" means there are four beats per measure with the second "4" meaning that the quarter-note gets the beat;

 

and so (in the case of 4/4) if four quarter-notes were shown per measure, each "straight" quarter-note will fall right on a beat, "ONE - two - Three - four, ONE - two - Three - four, ONE - two - Three - four", etc.

 

 

In THIS case, though, for whatever their particular reasons, the author wanted it written so that half-notes were used to equal the beat and tempo.

 

What time-signature is shown? 2/2? 4/2?

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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Unless there's some specific reason to play at a certain exact tempo, there's not really anything such as "the right speed".

When practicing, in fact, it helps if you tackle an exercise at several diff speeds---if it's difficult starting slowly helps (because you always want to practice at a speed that doesn't cause repeated mistakes) & it can be helpful to practice a piece at a slow speed, too, because that helps one develop rhythmic certitute.

 

As far as "the reason for the different ( note = whatever bpm ) in these examples of the articles Im reading"...there may not be a particular reason...in the case of the example you asked abt, it seems odd that it was written with a 1/2 note reference rather than 1/4 or 1/8 note but that's a question for the writer.

 

"your explanation is probably great, i just don't understand it yet."

 

Basically all I did was divide the 1/2 note into 1/8th notes...

what can I help you understand further , if you could be specific ?

 

 

 

 

d=halfnote
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