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Please, please help me!


Jenre

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Hello! I'm hoping at least one of you could give me a hand. I need to write a 500 word essay for college, and all I know is the title: 'Suitable Amp Requirements for rehearsal'

 

So, what are suitable amp requirements for rehearsal? Any and all genres!

 

Thank you, thank you, thank you!

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What seems to be the problem? Have you reviewed any threads here to research? There are a lot of threads dealing with low wqattage amps which discuss thier suitability for practice and performance... If you demonstrate that you have an understanding of the subject I think that myself and others would contribute. Try this, tell us what you think the requirements for a suitable rehearsal amp are and we will compulsively respond and thereby contribute to your goal. :)
Live long and prosper unless it is a good day to die.
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The problem is that i have absolutely no idea about amps. I know that I'm not going to need a full stack of marshalls! But apart from that I'm clueless. I learned how to play acoustic guitar and only plugged into an amp for the first time about 1month ago. Please help.

 

I think need to know about suitable wattage, makes, models, sizes etc for a variety of styles

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cool. Well, it is a ludicrously loaded question. Many variables and in the end it is totally subjective. You'll need to define the rehearsal space and what elements, drums, bass etc in the band.... I could getaway with a battery amp if everybody else played spoons and african thumb piano. Eliminate some of the variables by providing a scenario and I may be able to help.
Live long and prosper unless it is a good day to die.
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You are obviously expected to research this topic, as it is clearly outside your comfort zone. Comacoda is right - lotsa variables. You'll need totally different rigs and settings if you're gonna record, say, a solo acoustic piece a la' James Taylor, and then bring in a 6 piece band for the next piece. There are eminent studio engineers right here on this forum. You'll be fine.

 

500 words will be easy. Some of our posts are longer. :D You can also touch on various brands, and which models are revered as studio standards.

BTW, I've just coughed up over 80 words. Good luck. :thu:

Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
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As Comacoda says, everything depends on everything else. We're not trying to be obtuse here.

 

If you're rehearsing in a small garage, a Pignose might do - a rehearsal room might need a 15 watt, or if you're lucky enough to be able to rehearse in a full auditorium, then a full rig might actually be necessary.

 

Add a loud drummer (or two) and the equation changes.

 

Do an unplugged acoustic set and it turns on its head again.

 

In order to achieve a sensible dissertation you'll have to state assumptions of context at the beginning in order to apply some logic to the gear necessary.

 

500 words is only half a page typed - don't go hyper about it.

 

Geoff

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power the World will know Peace": Jimi Hendrix

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=738517&content=music

The Geoff - blame Caevan!!!

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I guess to start you off there are some questions you will have to decide on the answers to. From there you make decisions about the amp you want based on how well it fulfills your needs.

 

1. Are you going to play acoustic or electric?

 

2. Do you want only clean tones, overdriven tones, lots of distortion or death metal?

 

3. How much volume do you need to produce?

 

4. Do you want a tube based or solid state amp?

 

5. Is weight a concern?

 

6. Do you plan to gig with it?

 

7. How big is the room you want to play it in?

 

8. Is it possible that it could be too loud there?

 

9. Do you need effects built in? Or an effect loop?

 

10. Do you need a wide range of sounds or just one?

 

You need to decide what your answers are to these questions and probably quite a few more. There is a lot that goes into an amp buying decisions for most of us.

 

This is why you are getting pretty broad questions in response to your (to us) overly broad question.

 

You need to narrow down the focus of what you are trying to achieve.

Born on the Bayou

 

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What college are you at?? I went to Filton, they just made me write essays about accounting and marketing tho :( Wish I'd got assignments on guitar amps!! What course are you doing??

 

Sorry I can't be more help, I just have an amp for everything, mostly dictated by lack of funds tho :D

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Roughly, outlined...many here have come with good points.

 

Generally speaking, it depends on the band. In a "typical" band with say a couple of guitars, bass, drums, maybe keyboard, and vocals...and depending on if you are primarily rythm or lead guitarist (in some styles/bands there is no distinction)

 

The correct amp for rehearsals would depend HEAVILY on the type of music as well as type of amp. In blues for one example, we often like to push the tubes for a slight distortion/compression. The main way we do this is drive them a little hard. To drive a 100 watt tube amp hard, it is WAY too loud. Then you either need to get a "attenuator" of some kind to dampen the output.

 

In rehearsal, the absolute necessity is based on two things. 1) the vocals set the top level. Meaning you can't/shouldn't have the instruments even AT the level of the vocals. They should be less than that. So whether the vocalist is running throuh a PA, or small amp, his volume sets the highetst you can go (which ought to be well under that so he can be heard. Maybe in some genres screaming vocals...can be on par but if they are under, you don't hear them)...

2) is the drums. Drums can be played low (also options are some pads drummers can use to dampen their volume, but I think the best is most natural...they determine the lowest you can go) but wherever they are the drums you have to be able to be heard above them, or with them.

 

SO the vocals set the ceiling, the drums set the floor. You need an amp that can run like you want it (if clean is all you want, or clean but using pedals for OD, then you can have a higher rated amp...if you want the real amp sound, you need something with not too many watts).

 

It was different in the old days, but nowdays you can actually gig with your practice amp, as long as the gig has a good PA and you can mic the amp. in the old days you might need different amps, for different places.

 

Practice rooms are often a little dead, so you might need some reverb on the practice amp.

 

 

Maybe that is a help to get you started.

 

Again, the heading is too vague, so you could go into some detail about different styles of musics requirements. Depends also on the practice place.

====================================================

Check out my original music at

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/jacker

 

"In theory there is no difference between theory and practice,

but not in practice."

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Of course, (being an ex-college lecturer) the college probably gave you an off-the-wall task to put you ander pressure and test how good your research skills are.........

 

Just a thought.

 

 

Geoff

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power the World will know Peace": Jimi Hendrix

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/default.cfm?bandID=738517&content=music

The Geoff - blame Caevan!!!

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