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Swed_bass

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Just barely enough variation in the body shape to perhaps miss the KenSmith infringement. And of course, I can't see the neck profile. The photos/color-stain and use of body woods is so similar.

 

They do look lovely.

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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Originally posted by Tom Capasso:

Just barely enough variation in the body shape to perhaps miss the KenSmith infringement. And of course, I can't see the neck profile.

Fender must be making a fortune on lawsuits of J-bass and P-bass copies...

 

I just checked the Ken Smith basses and can´t honestly see a cloning on the body. Open both pages and compare yourself. Ok, they do have two horns each and some models have similar wood. Duh?

 

How much variation can you have on a bass guitar, anyway? Pick randomly five hunderd different ones and find the innovative defferences.

 

I think that this whole criticism is just taking the forum back to the "Behringer-Euro" all time low level. I guess the evolution up here just seized when some superior people got aboard the boats to cross the big sea, and left us in the dark, a few generations back... I´m sorry and regretful for showing you this local pirate lutherian.

What ever...
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Originally posted by Tom Capasso:

use of body woods is so similar.

Maybe using alder rather than ash would be more unique. Really, Tom... So far the only unique wood was that 35,000 years old swampwood on the Langcaster basses.
What ever...
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Originally posted by Swed_bass:

I think that this whole criticism is just taking the forum back to the "Behringer-Euro" all time low level. I guess the evolution up here just seized when some superior people got aboard the boats to cross the big sea, and left us in the dark, a few generations back...

LMAO!!!

 

If they sell those at IKEA I'll go and take a look; haven't been to the new local outlet since we bought the new curtain systems. :thu::D

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Originally posted by RicBassGuy:

Originally posted by robb.:

the pickups look like q-tuners to me. thoughts?

Those the ones you and greenboy were raving about a while back?
i've never heard them, so i can't take any credit. but they do look cool. i haven't had the energy to read a lot of the site -- it's very hippie-verbose.

 

robb.

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Swed_bass - you're right about the wood choices - these combinations show up in lot's of luthier pages. I think it's the tail that made me agree with an earlier comment. I still think they look similar, but I agree it's not such a clone. And given the location, Unicorn may have never seen a Ken Smith bass.

 

After going to BP Live, I'm more attuned to the similarities that basses share.

 

I strenuously disagree with the Behringer comments. Even if Unicorn used someone else's body shape, it's clear that they are building basses in their shop, putting their own crafts-person-ship into each instrument. Behringer's business practices (in my opinion) are quite different.

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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  • 2 months later...

Thanks swed_bass for the nice words!

 

If anyone out there want to know the truth about these basses, get the facts from me instead of taking educated guesses as facts. I´m´ in fact working at Unicornbass, Sweden and yes, i have seen the Ken Smith basses and the dual "seagull" cutout doesn´t´in fact come from the Ken Smith basses, they are a design-trick to get a compact look and at the same time have ample support for the right (or left if youre a lefthand player) forearm and as far as Alembic goes... anyone interested in a second-hand Series II 4-string?? will get one int the shop for sale soon as a part trade-in for a Classic masterclass.

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Originally posted by Swed_bass:

I´m sorry and regretful for showing you this local pirate lutherian.

Is that Wisconsin Synod or Missouri Synod? ;)

 

These are seriously beautiful basses, and the sound clips are outstanding. They seem very responsive & expressive, even, & full of sustain. Definitely worth a look, I'd think, for anyone in the market for a boutique bass. It would be good if they could get a few into this country, to someone like JPJ (Blueberry Hill), who caters to a boutique market.

 

anyone interested in a second-hand Series II 4-string?? will get one int the shop for sale soon as a part trade-in for a Classic masterclass.

 

Touche! :thu:

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Right now the US seems to be very good value in terms of custom basses. Both Cliff Bordwell and Nordstrand bass guitars are quite a bit cheaper than the European basses.

 

Just my observation. Christian, what's the Alembic selling for?

 

Davo

"We will make you bob your head whether you want to or not". - David Sisk
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Nice looking basses. I don't really see where anyone could say they were ripping off Ken Smith. I mean really, how much variation can there be in a natural finish bass? The bodies of these are different in shape. There are only so many tone woods out there, and every bass maker uses most of them.

 

I own a Ken Smith, and I just don't see it. I would never look at one of those Unicorns and think it's a Smith.

Feel free to visit my band's site

Delusional Mind

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You know, I DID use a smiley in my initial post, indicating that my dig was tongue in cheek.

 

But since people are going to get pissy about it, I would like to formally retract my statement implying that these two basses may be similar.

 

http://rhee.net/LDLD/ks.jpg

 

You guys are right. I can't see how someone could mistake one for the other.

 

I don't really see where anyone could say they were ripping off Ken Smith.
Again, if you were referring to me, that was not my implication.

 

 

I mean really, how much variation can there be in a natural finish bass?
How high can you count?

 

http://rhee.net/LDLD/nat.jpg

"For instance" is not proof.

 

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I mean really, how much variation can there be in a natural finish bass?

How high can you count?

You know what I mean.. If you take the basic outline of a standard P-bass and superimpose it over any of those basses shown you'll see they all conform to that same basic body pattern. Even that really funky looking first one. (it looks dangerous!)

 

I don't really see where anyone could say they were ripping off Ken Smith.

Again, if you were referring to me, that was not my implication.

I wasn't really meaning you.. I saw the smiley.. I was simply trying to derail the idea they were copying the Smith design. Any more than Ken Smith was "copying" the fender P-bass.

Feel free to visit my band's site

Delusional Mind

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There is not a picture in the universe that is going to convince me any of those basses look like a Precision Bass.

 

That would be like saying a Jazz Bass looks like a Precision Bass. Similarities? Sure, they are both made of wood and both have a double cutaway and a plank-style body. They sure do look very different to me, though. Maybe I just have an eye for blaring details.

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Alright now everybody, let's play nice.

 

I think that the topic does bring up an interesting point in that desipte the myriad of design variations,there are a limited numbers of designs that combine ergonomics with traditional esthetics. Let's be honest, while the Spalt Magma bass (the dangerous looking one in 09's post) might be quite ergonomic, I doubt that many of us would want to take it to a Blues or C&W gig! :D Guitarists and bassplayers tend to, by and large, stick to traditional(ish) designs.

 

This must make it very difficult for instrument makers to come up with new designs that are also sellable. I imagine that Spalt sells very few of it radical designs compared to its more traditonal shaped "Viper" basses.

 

To my eye, The Nordstrand NX has a profile very similar to the Fender Jazz. The Fodera Monarch and the Peavey Cirrus are just as obviously decendants of the Precision. I'm not saying there is a one-to-one correlation, I'm saying that you can see the "family lines".

 

Amongst a sea of variables there are actually far fewer 'practical' combinations. Given the sheer number of manufacturers producing basses nowadays, I doubt very seriously that we are going to see anything radically different than the current major (i.e. double & single cutaway , no cutaway. Bolt-on, set-in and neckthrough) designs become a new standard. Let's face it, if those remain the basic parameters, how much significant design variation can there be? Especially if you are producing instruments as a means of making a living.

 

So my Forum bothers and sisters, play what you like it's all good!

 

Come on now, group hug! :love:

Nothing is as it seems but everything is exactly what it is - B. Banzai

 

Life is what happens while you are busy playing in bands.

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