Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Am I alone in this? Another Worship band question...


carpedebass

Recommended Posts

I've never really been able to commune with the Father by sitting in a prayer closet and praying for hours as so many seem to be able to do. It seems like when I pick up my bass and play, He and I are sort of at one. That's when I seem to "hear" from Him and I feel like I'm sending my very heart to Him with every note. Anyone else like this, or is it just me? :D

Love God...Love People!

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 21
  • Created
  • Last Reply

For me, playing is another part of worship. If I'm only playing and not spending time seperately in prayer and/or reading scripture, I feel a bit deprived. I've been feeling a bit deprived lately. :)

 

Oh, and I can rarely ever sit and pray for hours because I'm a pretty active guy. My prayers are usually spread throughout the day as I'm working, driving and whatnot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

davio, I hear you. I pray and read also because that is how you learn the nature of God...through His written word. I just seem to be closer to Him when I'm playing, dig? Maybe it's because that's what I spend more time doing...I don't know.

Love God...Love People!

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't play in a worship band as such, as the denomination to which I belong is fairly conservative in their weekly meetings. But I have performed on countless occasions in choirs, as an accompanist for hymns, and as a vocal and instrumental soloist. I have had many deeply religious experiences while playing; at a close friend's funeral, I was asked to play a few musical numbers and I know that I played far beyond my abilities, and I believe that I had divine help so that I could make the program as meaningful as possible for all those in attendance.

 

I think, as you say, that it's a matter of practice. Many people DON'T feel inspired by music whether it is sacred or secular in its intent. But I'm also rarely "inspired" by poetry. I just don't get it like others do. I think each individual, regardless of his/her system of (non-)belief, can associate strong feelings with any sort of activity.

 

I do believe, however, that music is one activity with an inherently strong potential to move and inspire.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Isn't that about what Paul meant in 1 Thessalonians 5:17 when he said "Pray without ceasing?"

 

I think all spiritual folk, whether Christian, Jewish, Muslim, Buddhist or even animist, I suppose, seek to commune with God in everyday life.

 

And whether we are eating, playing music or even having sex, when done in a worshipful and prayerful manner becomes an act of prayer.

 

Imagine that. One of the best arguments for a committed sexual life with a single partner is that you can look at her and say, "God wants us to do this!"

Yep. I'm the other voice in the head of davebrownbass.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi carp,

 

It's true with myself, sometimes I can't seem to say the right words and need to pull out my guitar and play some songs that I make up spontaneously (I can't quite seem to worship ALONE with a bass guitar, but if you can, awesome :) )

 

But don't seek it as a replacement for prayer. Prayer and alone time with God is intimacy, and leads you closer to Him. If you're having problems doing that, you might have to ask yourself a few questions... (which go beyond the scope of what we're asking here).. such as why that's happening. Do you really know HOW to pray? What to pray for? Do you have a hunger for his presence? Check out a book called "Why Revival Tarries" by Leonard Ravenhill -- it's probably the best Christian book I have read in my life and will definitely inspire and change your prayer life radically.

 

~scyzoryk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by scyzoryk:

Hi carp,

 

It's true with myself, sometimes I can't seem to say the right words and need to pull out my guitar and play some songs that I make up spontaneously (I can't quite seem to worship ALONE with a bass guitar, but if you can, awesome :) )

 

But don't seek it as a replacement for prayer. Prayer and alone time with God is intimacy, and leads you closer to Him. If you're having problems doing that, you might have to ask yourself a few questions... (which go beyond the scope of what we're asking here).. such as why that's happening. Do you really know HOW to pray? What to pray for? Do you have a hunger for his presence? Check out a book called "Why Revival Tarries" by Leonard Ravenhill -- it's probably the best Christian book I have read in my life and will definitely inspire and change your prayer life radically.

 

~scyzoryk

I'll give it a looking at, but I absolutely still pray and study His word. I just seem to be closer to Him when I'm playing for Him.

Love God...Love People!

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, where i'm from, there are no worship bands as such. Music is usually from a single church organ and is mostly old Gregorian style.

 

Additionally, i'm not a church-goer and i don't really have any real faith, so this makes worship bands all the more interesting for me.

 

I hope You all don't mind if i ask a few questions:

Does playing in a worship band add to the joy of playing?

Do You guys somehow feel especially connected with God during your church gigs?

Does playing in a church somehow complement your prayers and church routines?

Do You have any real fans among the church crowd, who go there partly because of You?

 

Thanks for the answers!

Warwick Streamer Jazzman 5, Fernandes LEB-2

Ashdown ABM-300, Ashdown ABM 4x10

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Gab:

Does playing in a worship band add to the joy of playing?

For me...absolutely. I enjoyed playing before I became a Christian, but now I feel it's what I was created to do...play for the Father.

Do You guys somehow feel especially connected with God during your church gigs?

Again, yes. I feel like I'm doing what I was created to do.

Does playing in a church somehow complement your prayers and church routines?

I believe everyone is put on this earth for a reason. This is that reason for me. It in no way takes the place of prayer, reading God's word, or being taught, but yes, I'd say it does compliment it.

Do You have any real fans among the church crowd, who go there partly because of You?

I would say that there are people who were attracted because of the music we play and the attitude we play it in, but not necessarily because of just me.

 

Thanks for the answers!

Love God...Love People!

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey, if playing your instrument gets you closer to God, play your instrument. I do, however, agree with what has been said about that not being the only way you need to spend time with God. Time spent reading the Bible, in prayer, and in service to others are equally important in cultivating a full and balanced Christian life. If you neglect any of those things, you are actually crippling yourself.

Specialization is for ants. Get into finding God wherever you are and in whatever you do.

Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Gab:

:

Does playing in a worship band add to the joy of playing?

 

Let's say it adds a dimension to playing that isn't present playing for secular audiences. I always enjoy playing, but worshipping with music is way cool.

 

Do You guys somehow feel especially connected with God during your church gigs?

 

I'd say it intensifies or reinforces the existing connection. Maybe it just reminds me the connection is in existance.

 

Does playing in a church somehow complement your prayers and church routines?

 

It's just part of my life as a Christian. I think it should be the same or at least very similar with any gift or talent God gives, if the giftee is using it in service to God.

 

Do You have any real fans among the church crowd, who go there partly because of You?

 

That would be kinda like going to a restaurant for the napkins.

Always remember that you are unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Picker:

Originally posted by Gab:

:

Does playing in a worship band add to the joy of playing?

 

Let's say it adds a dimension to playing that isn't present playing for secular audiences. I always enjoy playing, but worshipping with music is way cool.

 

Do You guys somehow feel especially connected with God during your church gigs?

 

I'd say it intensifies or reinforces the existing connection. Maybe it just reminds me the connection is in existance.

 

Does playing in a church somehow complement your prayers and church routines?

 

It's just part of my life as a Christian. I think it should be the same or at least very similar with any gift or talent God gives, if the giftee is using it in service to God.

 

Do You have any real fans among the church crowd, who go there partly because of You?

 

That would be kinda like going to a restaurant for the napkins.

picker is dead on with everything that he said. This quote, the one above it... wow. talk about being concise.

 

I feel closest to God when i study the bible and supplementary texts (i'm currently looking at an apologetics book by ravi zacharias.

 

I feel the best about my faith and my daily walk when i am reminded of God's omnipotence.

 

I am encouraged by my peers who remind me that i'm not the only person who is trying to lead a life that is pleasing in God's eyes. I'm just saying is all...

 

jason

2cor5:21

Soli Deo Gloria

 

"it's the beauty of a community. it takes a village to raise a[n] [LLroomtempJ]." -robb

 

My YouTube Channel

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hey Gab, google around your area ... er, Budapest, Hungary? Well, that might be a little difficult. :freak:

 

Anyway, I was going to say that a friend of mine now goes to one of the non-denominational worship services with contemporary Christian music. She used to go to a Unitarian church, which I've been told is maybe a little more palatable for people who would describe themselves as "not a church-goer and i don't really have any real faith". (Nothing against Unitarians; the different denominations exist for a reason.) For example, you probably wouldn't be comfortable in a southern Baptist church. But, you may find a good fit with a worship service; that's what I'm trying to get at.

 

Picker picked apart your post and posted perfectly good responses. :thu: I'll just add that it's probably a more supportive environment for musicians than, say, a biker bar full of rowdies and hecklers. Don't look for applause, but look for glowing smiles on everyone's faces. There's a religious explanation for why you (the band) and the congregation experience an intimate happiness, but if you're not ready to hear that then just know that it can be a really enjoyable experience.

 

Peace.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by RicBassGuy:

Hey Gab, google around your area ... er, Budapest, Hungary? Well, that might be a little difficult. :freak:

 

Anyway, I was going to say that a friend of mine now goes to one of the non-denominational worship services with contemporary Christian music. She used to go to a Unitarian church, which I've been told is maybe a little more palatable for people who would describe themselves as "not a church-goer and i don't really have any real faith". (Nothing against Unitarians; the different denominations exist for a reason.) For example, you probably wouldn't be comfortable in a southern Baptist church. But, you may find a good fit with a worship service; that's what I'm trying to get at.

 

Picker picked apart your post and posted perfectly good responses. :thu: I'll just add that it's probably a more supportive environment for musicians than, say, a biker bar full of rowdies and hecklers. Don't look for applause, but look for glowing smiles on everyone's faces. There's a religious explanation for why you (the band) and the congregation experience an intimate happiness, but if you're not ready to hear that then just know that it can be a really enjoyable experience.

 

Peace.

Thanks for all the input! I better rephrase the "not a church-goer and i don't really have any real faith" sentence and simply say faithless. To tell You the truth, i don't have any friends here who could be considered religious. Strange, but religion is getting less and less attention and is not a part of every day lif as it used to be. That's why its so interesting to hear how You guys live and play music.

Warwick Streamer Jazzman 5, Fernandes LEB-2

Ashdown ABM-300, Ashdown ABM 4x10

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My old drummer used to say that he liked playing at church but sometimes felt like a bit of a clanging cymbal...

 

However back to the "spiritual experience" thang...I consider the groove to be a part of common grace that can be enjoyed by all. It can be freed from other things in a Church environment -- much like relations with one's wife and random encounters in bars are the same in some ways and very different in others (See Dave's post for more eloquence).

A man is not usually called upon to have an opinion of his own talents at all; he can very well go on improving them to the best of his ability without deciding on his own precise niche in the temple of Fame. -- C.S.Lewis
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...