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Family Affair


EZ

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:cool: I recently did a gospel show; the guitar players wife just cut a CD and is out promoting it, and I offered to do the promo shows if needed. I could not hear myself as we played. The guitar player had changed some of the changes in some of the songs, and the keyboard player, and I had a hard time following, but managed ok. The drummer is good really good, but young, and does not stay in the pocket with me. I tried to keep him with me, but sometimes he would just start doing too much. He is the guitar players son. My question is has any of you had any of these problem, and if so what did you do about them. The guitar player and I are best friend from back when we were teens, I do not want to offend anyone. HELP!!!!!!!!!

:confused:

If you smell something stinking, it's juz me, I'm funky like that
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I betcha EVERYONE has has these problems. The answer to the first problem is to either turn up your bass or ask if anyone else would mind turning down (well, you could also raise your bass amp so that it's pointing right at your head...). You can ask your friend the guitar player to rehearse with you so that either (A) you can learn the changes he's playing now, or (B) he can figure out that he's playing things that he shouldn't play. The answer to working with a young drummer is to work with him at rehearsals as well - you may be in a position to mentor him in the art of the groove (or you may just be some old guy his dad knows, in which case he won't listen anyway...) In any case, the right approach is to speak to him as an equal, and try to give him the chance to find out that drummers and bass players are supposed to work together. (By the way, is the drummer's time bad, or are the two of you just feeling the songs differently? In any event, I've found that one way to avoid offending people is to approach every problem as an opportunity to improve the sound of the ensemble and NOT as a chance to tell them that they're making mistakes.

Dave Martin

Java Jive Studio

Nashville, TN

www.javajivestudio.com

 

Cuppa Joe Records

www.cuppajoerecords.com

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Originally posted by Dave Martin:

You can ask your friend the guitar player to rehearse with you so that either (A) you can learn the changes he's playing now, The answer to working with a young drummer is to work with him at rehearsals as welll (By the way, is the drummer's time bad, or are the two of you just feeling the songs differently?

:cool: We had about three rehearsals only one with everyone, the keyboard player and I had to learn the songs from the CD, and were playing the same stuff; Im not sure, where my friend got the different cords. As for the drummer his timing is cool he just does not lock the pocket. Case in point one song would have went better with a disco stomp, but he would not stay there, he would play it for a bar or two then back to what he wanted to play. (I know drummers hate it,) It would have helped the drive of the song. I hope if I do another set with them that, we have more rehearsals than we did.
If you smell something stinking, it's juz me, I'm funky like that
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What I always do with a drummer I have never worked with before, is to suggest we get together and work through the grooves of the various songs to strengthen our teamwork. Its amazing how rehearsing alone with a drummer can sharpen both of you. Its a question of mutual reinforcement. I've yet to meet a drummer who has turned down my invitation based on this principle. I'm sure this guy will be no exception, particularly if he is as good as you say.
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I have always been a fan the bass and the drums getting together on their own to work out the grooves. It will help to either develop or hone their communication skills. A separate practice is ideal, but even meeting 30 minutes before a full band rehersal can work wonders.

 

After you and your drummer have established a telepathic link, you will be better armed to go into rehersal and figure out what's up with the changes.

My whole trick is to keep the tune well out in front. If I play Tchaikovsky, I play his melodies and skip his spiritual struggle. ~Liberace
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