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London Lowdowners: any Cream reports?


tarkus

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Well - the RAH gigs are in mid-swing. I've heard nothing other than the ticket price around $1400 US.

 

Well - lets have it:

 

Set Lists, Gear, teasers, etc...

 

I wanna know!

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From The New York Times (May 2nd, London).

 

------------------------

A sample from the article...

 

"Thanks for waiting all these years," Mr. Clapton said onstage. "We didn't go very long. The slings and arrows of outrageous fortune cut us off in our prime."

 

Mr. Baker spoke up: "This is our prime, what do you mean?"

------------------------

 

Photo here looks like Jack's using a Gibson EB-1. Guess Gibson didn't think fast enough to ship him one of their new EB-3 reissues for the photo opportunity. ( :mad: Hey, Gibson, do I have to do ALL of your PR work for you? When are you going to hire people who pay attention to the music world instead of the antique instrument price quotes?)

 

Also see The Financial Times (May 4th). and the Winnipeg Sun (May 4th).

I'm sure there'll be many others to follow, but I have to go back to real work now (ahem).

 

I wish I didn't need that spare kidney... :D

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Originally posted by dcr:

$1,400? Screw them.

The article stated that scalpers were getting $1000 for tickets. I doubt highly that the face value was anywhere near that.

 

By the sound of the article, the show was underwhelming.

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I think people might have been waiting for something they would never get out of a Cream reunion. These guys have really mellowed with the passage of 35+ years and I don't think there's anywhere near the animosity between them that fired the music before. Add in their advanced years and I think it's going to be a very different kind of musical experience.

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"My concern is, and I have to, uh, check with my accountant, that this might bump me into a higher, uh, tax..."

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Originally posted by Fred the bass player:

From Photo here looks like Jack's using a Gibson EB-1. Guess Gibson didn't think fast enough to ship him one of their new EB-3 reissues for the photo opportunity. ( :mad: Hey, Gibson, do I have to do ALL of your PR work for you? When are you going to hire people who pay attention to the music world instead of the antique instrument price quotes?)

 

Bingo
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I have this unnerving premonition that some background people are on the phone to NY/LA booking agencies today based on these shows. Maybe a little late to book arenas, but after seeing what they did for Van Hagar and the resuccitated Eagles I wouldn't be surprised if they announce $100-200/seat arena tickets in the near future. And some of us, like it or not, WILL pay the price. Hey, we bought our share of Cream and Clapton/Bruce music on this side of the pond too, didn't we?

 

Yeah, I hear the boos and catcalls, but when the announcement's made and the ticket windows open, you'll have your credit cards ready like I will.

:wave:

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I don't know. It sounds like Clapton dragged his feet over this, and I don't know that he would want to do an entire tour. I would be very inclined to see this, but I just don't know that all three members would be interested in doing a fullscale American tour.

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"My concern is, and I have to, uh, check with my accountant, that this might bump me into a higher, uh, tax..."

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I didn't go as I'm not a Clapton fan. Newspapers say that they took quite a long time to warm up, but when they did they were very good.

 

They look kind of sad, at that age they should be playing jazz. Davo

"We will make you bob your head whether you want to or not". - David Sisk
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Well, from the pics I can tell that bruce has a custom warwick on a stand(check the headstock, everything else is different. And, oh ya

BAKER IS WEARING A CREAM T SHRT!

Hiram Bullock thinks I like the band volume too soft (but he plays guitar). Joe Sample thinks I like it way too loud (but he plays piano). -Marcus Miller
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Originally posted by The Very Rvd. Joe Grundy:

Bakers been out for ages with some kind of illness, I dont think hes quite 'match fit' yet. Bruce had liver cancer or something. Clapton has an OBE and plays at his daughters school. I think this was a now or never kind of arrangement and I would be extremly suprised to see a tour.

Yeah I think thats about it. I don't think Bruce could survive a tour. If anything there might an LA or New York show but I doubt anything beyond one or two shows. Granted if they came to the midwest, I'd pay some clams to see em.

Together all sing their different songs in union - the Uni-verse.

My Current Project

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Originally posted by Fred the bass player:

Yeah, I hear the boos and catcalls, but when the announcement's made and the ticket windows open, you'll have your credit cards ready like I will.

:wave:

Not me and I love Cream - they were a huge early influence on me.

 

The most I've ever payed for a ticket is $50 and that was to see James Brown AND Tower of Power.

 

Wouldn't have done that, but I'd never seen JB or TOP before and didn't want to miss Soul Brother #1 like I did Miles and so many others.

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Yeah, I'm the target generation. I studied those Cream records diligently and went to see them live.

 

I don't go to big concerts anymore, the sound and sight is usually terrible and you have to get tickets so far in advance that it almost guarantees that I will have a gig when the actual date arrives.

 

I would like to see them play. I mentioned in an earlier thread that I thought that maybe this reunion would be the kick in the pants that E.C. needs to get off his easy listening kick.

 

The reviews are keeping me satisfied so far.

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I recieved this via email from a friend...a little long but a good review...pictures on bottom...

 

2 early reviews -

 

From the Telegraph:

 

Diminished version of their former selves, but very,

very good

By David Cheal

(Filed: 03/05/2005)

 

When I first heard that Cream were getting back

together for a series of concerts at the Albert Hall, I called out across the arts desk: "I have to be there."

 

This, surely, was the mother of all reunions, the

great sixties super group back together on stage 37 years after they called it a day - and in the very same concert hall where they performed their farewell show in 1968.

 

I had good reason to stake my claim to that precious reviewing slot: Best of Cream was the first album I ever bought, a precocious teenager hooked on the British blues boom of the sixties, but this one was personal.

 

Along with the excitement came the nagging worries. The three members of Cream are all now in their sixties. Drummer Ginger Baker has an arthritic knee.

 

Bassist Jack Bruce has had a liver transplant. Would it be a night to recapture the magic of their famous semi-improvised jams, or would it be turn out to be an embarrassment, three wrinkly old rockers desperately trying to recapture their glorious youths?

 

Well, it didn't exactly hit the ground running.

Having been greeted with a huge roar of affection from the crowd, they limbered up with the lightweight I'm So Glad. Eric Clapton rattled off a so so solo. Bruce sounded tense.

 

Song two, the slow, slinky blues of Spoonful, was

more encouraging: Bruce's voice started to show some grit, the music began to click. Clapton's solo here was sharper, fiercer, more fluent. Strange, though, to see him as just one third of a band, rather than as the star of the show.

 

When they'd been on stage for 20 odd minutes I did

begin to wonder whether this was going to be a bit of a letdown: another slow blues tune, Sleepy Time Baby, reinforced this impression.

 

Then came NSU, their first chance to embark on one of those famous instrumental excursions. Baker drove the song along in his utterly distinctive and deceptively easy going style, Bruce's fingers were flying, Clapton

began to strut. Then came Badge, and Clapton gave us one of his yodels. Finally, Cream were up and running.

 

Politician was dark and groovy. Rolling and Tumbling, with Bruce on harmonica, was sensational, an express train of a song, hurtling along with purpose, power and unstoppable momentum. For the first of many occasions during the evening, I had to sit, blink, look around the stage and remind myself that I was watching Cream at the Albert Hall - and they were

very, very good.

 

Inevitably, they were a diminished version of their former selves. There was less of the brutal

physicality that used to be their hallmark. Bruce

periodically reclined against a high stool, songs such as Crossroads were taken at a slower lick. They are not young men, and they were not playing, as they once did, as if their lives depended on it.

 

But they were never less than good, often brilliant, occasionally inspired. And they got better as the night went on. White Room was massive, glorious.

 

Many reunions are tawdry, half-baked affairs. But

this one was different, special. It didn't quite live up to the expectation, but still: in years to come, I'll be able to say with pride: Cream, Albert Hall,

2005. I was there.

 

 

From the Times online:

Cream

David Sinclair at the Albert Hall

 

RARELY does a rock show come with so much historical baggage. Thirty-seven years since they had last played a concert together at the Albert Hall on November 26, 1968 Eric Clapton, Jack Bruce and Ginger Baker returned there last night.

 

A lifetime had passed, for both group and audience, and it looked like it. Fans who might last have seen the original power trio when they were at school are now captains of industry.

 

Never before have the founding members of a group of this order made the transition from pioneers to

nostalgic turn in one such gigantic step. Their reward was a tumultuous standing ovation before they had even played a note and a succession of standing ovations after virtually every number they played thereafter.

 

The rest of the time, however, the audience although clearly enthused, remained firmly in their seats.

 

The group, while evidently well-rehearsed and very

happy to be on stage together, were not about to

revisit the shock-and-awe tactics for which they are best remembered. During the opening salvo of I'm So Glad and Spoonful they made a few brief, tentative steps in the direction of an improvised free-for-all, but the closest they came to reviving the grandstanding habits of old was an extended solo section in Sweet Wine.

 

Instead they played with a newfound economy of effort that worked to best advantage on some of their more out of the way, pop-flavoured songs including Deserted Cities of the Heart and a surprise inclusion of Pressed Rat And Warthog, the lysergic nursery rhyme narrated by Baker in his cockney growl.

 

There were the odd fumbles here and there. During a raucous Rollin and Tumblin, Bruce found it was his harmonica that was doing the rolling and tumbling somewhere between hand and mouth. Baker dropped a stick during the ensuing Stormy Monday Blues and completely missed the turnaround at the end of the first chorus of White Room. But these were minor quibbles.

 

Clapton, at 60, was not only the youngest and fittest of the three, but also the most comfortable in this elevated environment and, almost without trying, acquitted himself as first among equals. His soloing was simply outstanding, as was Bruce's vocal performance, especially on Born Under a Bad Sign and Politician, although the relaxed stroll which the trio took through Crossroads was a disappointment compared

with the electrifying drama of the classic version as captured on Wheels of Fire.

 

It ended with Baker playing his signature drum solo Toad. Here again the arrangement was more in the concise spirit of the studio recording of the number on Fresh Cream than the rambling 15-minute assault curse of the live version on Wheels of Fire. It was nticeable how he made every beat count, striking histoms with incredible precision to produce that familiar sound of logs rolling down a mountainside.

 

 

You cant turn back the clock, and in truth, they

didnt try. But it was still a tremendous thrill to

see the three of them together again after all these years.

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v615/JWHNY/cream.jpg

 

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v615/JWHNY/EarlyCre.jpg

"The world will still be turning when you've gone." - Black Sabbath

 

Band site: www.finespunmusic.com

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The first time I saw Cream was there first trip to Los Angeles. They were onstage at the Whiskey. Double Stacked Marshals, Double Bass Drums. Now they have double chins.

 

If I could see them for double the cost of tickets from the sixties, it would be the ultimate bargain.

 

Back then I was playing a Gibson EB-3. I still wish I had it. You could fly on that fart machine.

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Reading all of the mud slung at cream for being old (!!??!) and seeing the pictures of them in their 60's got me kind of depressed...so I threw in disraeligears and found this picture on the web...

http://www.itrstudio.com/images/gallery/clapton.jpg

I'm happy to see my socks have officialy been rocked off!!!

Hiram Bullock thinks I like the band volume too soft (but he plays guitar). Joe Sample thinks I like it way too loud (but he plays piano). -Marcus Miller
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  • 2 weeks later...

Bump: for those interested in hearing from the unofficial "fourth" member of the band - poet/lyricist Pete Brown - among other things, how he came up with the lyrics to "White Room":

Rolling Stone, May 17, 2005.

 

And in case you were wondering if the RAH concerts were recorded for a future DVD: 4RFV, Ireland, May 18, 2005.

(it's a slow day at the office) TTFN! :wave:

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  • 1 month later...

(bump) I have an unconfirmed rumor that a Cream concert is being planned at Madison Square Garden for November. Nothing on Google so far but it was just a random search. I'll post any links that I come up with, please do the same for us here.

:wave:

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