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I HAVE IN MY POSSESION A VINTAGE ALL ORIGIANL 69 JAZZ!!!!


dsanders

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Originally posted by Gospel5.5theZealot:

i let it slide hoping that someone would explain it in time.....what is binding? neck binding?

Binding is a process that is used to hold wood together. This is common on acoustic guitar bodies like this Taylor. The binding connects the tops to the side, and can be made of wood or other materials, and is often decorated.

http://www.taylorguitars.com/guitars/images/Presentation/hero.jpg

 

Electric basses don't usually have body binding (it's one piece of wood), but some have neck binding. This uses the binding to connect the neck to the fingerboard. This vintage '75 (Marcus-style) has black neck binding. Sorry it's hard to see here - the description on the Fender website reads:

'75 Jazz Bass®

 

Bound fingerboards, three-knob controls (volume neck, volume bridge, master tone) and block inlays are standout features of this classic. The 75 J Bass® is available with either a rosewood or maple fingerboard. The rosewood incorporates White binding, Pearloid block inlays and a three-ply White pickguard; the maple has Black fingerboard binding, Black block inlays and a three-ply Black pickguard. Other 75 Jazz Bass attributes include a solid ash body, bullet truss rod and our proprietary three-bolt Micro-Tilt neck adjustment feature.

http://www.fender.com/new_repository/fender_guitars/images/0190302_md.jpg

 

Rickenbacker and Brian Moore are two companies that have used binding on basses.

 

I've heard that Gibson made some basses with bound necks, including some models of the EB3. Mine is not bound. For myself, I don't see the point of neck binding, and don't think the look is worth the extra effort.

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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Bump you are right I am interested in playing the bass. Keeping it in valuable condition is important to me, I don't plan on altering it once I own it. The sound of it is also important to me, but even if the bass doesn't sound as good as I hope, I still want it. There is just something to be said about owning a piece of our heritage as players. I doubt that the 69 will sound as good as my Lakland, but I would still like to put flats on it and, well just have it for the sake of owning an old jazz. ;)

 

I put the title in all caps on purpose, I was excited. And I know that I spelled original wrong, sorry.

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Originally posted by Mike Dimin:

Finding the # on the back of the neck is the only sure way.

or at least the only sure way of dating the neck. ;)
http://www.briantimpe.com/images/LDL/dots/blue.JPGhttp://www.briantimpe.com/images/LDL/dots/black.JPGhttp://www.briantimpe.com/images/LDL/dots/fuscia.JPGhttp://www.briantimpe.com/images/LDL/dots/grey.JPGhttp://www.briantimpe.com/images/LDL/dots/orange.JPGhttp://www.briantimpe.com/images/LDL/dots/purple.JPGhttp://www.briantimpe.com/images/LDL/dots/red.JPGhttp://www.briantimpe.com/images/LDL/dots/yellow.JPG
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Originally posted by Bumpcity:

I've seen late 60's/early 70's Fender basses that are in ecellent condition sell for $1500-2000.

 

I say fix that beast up and plug it in. Play it.

I played a '74 P-Bass in very good condition with a hang tag of $2200 :eek: last week!

But I totally agree, if it is of no musical value (i.e. broken and unplayable), I consider it of little value.

"Start listening to music!".

-Jeremy C

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I would suggest getting the that you get the nut fixed to begin with, and then see if you can live with the binding issues.
Hiram Bullock thinks I like the band volume too soft (but he plays guitar). Joe Sample thinks I like it way too loud (but he plays piano). -Marcus Miller
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But I totally agree, if it is of no musical value (i.e. broken and unplayable), I consider it of little value
All it needs is a nut, and about an inch of neck binding over first position on the E side. I would'nt consider it broken, but it is not playable at this point.
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Geez. Give the guy a break. He found a nice old Jazz bass to use at the very least. I say congrats! If the neck wasn't suposed to be removed,it probably wouldn't be bolted on. If the neck is removed carefully (watch that thin wood and finish!) how is it going to harm the bass? Leo himself would probably get a good chuckle out of folks freaking out about taking the neck off. Gimme a break.
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I would suggest getting the that you get the nut fixed to begin with, and then see if you can live with the binding issues
Why? It's going to be in the Mike's shop anyway I might as well have the binding taken care of. Again I have no intention of making this my primary bass, and I have no intention of altering it in anyway. I have other basses for work, this is just for the opportunity to own something meaningful.
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Hi dsanders,

 

I obviously can't tell how bad the wear on the binding is from over here. BUt I just thought that maybe it was not completely necesary to restore binding, maybe more of a decorative alteration. Just my train of thought. Good luck with the project. Hope it turns out nicely. Btw, what kind of lakland do you play.

Hiram Bullock thinks I like the band volume too soft (but he plays guitar). Joe Sample thinks I like it way too loud (but he plays piano). -Marcus Miller
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Originally posted by dsanders:

I would suggest getting the that you get the nut fixed to begin with, and then see if you can live with the binding issues
Why? It's going to be in the Mike's shop anyway I might as well have the binding taken care of. Again I have no intention of making this my primary bass, and I have no intention of altering it in anyway. I have other basses for work, this is just for the opportunity to own something meaningful.
I'll have to tell Mike to call me when it's finished so I can give it a go before he sends it back to you. ;)
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Originally posted by Bumpcity:

I'll have to tell Mike to call me when it's finished so I can give it a go before he sends it back to you. ;) [/QB]

Isn't that kind of you bumpcity, thinking of others and being selfless enough to drive down to Mr. Lull's shops in the (probably) pouring rain just to make sure Dsanders bass is doing ok. This is what the Lowdown is all about. :D
Hiram Bullock thinks I like the band volume too soft (but he plays guitar). Joe Sample thinks I like it way too loud (but he plays piano). -Marcus Miller
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Sonds good to me Bump, the only problem is it's not going to be out your way until the end of the summer. The bass is in my care, but I will not be given the go-ahead to buy it until late June....

 

I guess I can wait, but it's a bummer that it is going to be sitting in my house for months before I can get my funk on. Oh well :rolleyes:

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Originally posted by Prague:

That devalues it greatly for me. I've never had to remove a neck in my life, nor would I like a guitar taken apart for no reason.

 

You took it apart just because you wanted to verify it's vintage? Before it was even set up and played (maybe even some new strings and polish)? It didn't need disassembly. Let's hope someone gets it put back together properly.

 

I share your zeal but tearing into vintage instruments without cause is not a good thing to do.

:confused:

 

Dude,

 

It's a BOLT-ON neck. Relax.

 

I've removed the necks on many bolt-on instruments...it didn't devalue them at all. On old Jazz basses it's the only way you can access the truss rod to make an adjustment anyway.

 

What devalues an instrument is:

 

-Superficial damage to the finish.

 

-The absence of all original electronics and hardware

 

-Structural damage of the instrument itself.

 

Removing the neck is usually the only way to tell how old the instrument is anyway.

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Originally posted by Bumpcity:

I'll have to tell Mike to call me when it's finished so I can give it a go before he sends it back to you. ;)

The luv has officially been noted.

 

You may go about your business once again.

 

Peace.

--s-uu

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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