Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Jamming with others?


Luke73

Recommended Posts

Hi All,

 

I'm still a beginner bassist. I've had my bass for about 18 months.

 

I took lessons for about the first year, but I stopped them after not really thinking I was spending my money and time with the teacher very efficiently. I think I'll try and find another teacher soon, but that's another story.

 

Since then I've been practising at home, and worked through a few bass method books.

 

I'm fairly happy with my progress at the moment, and I'm enjoying playing at home very much, but I think I'd like to have a go at playing with others.

 

I don't really want to start a band as such just yet, or gain work as a bassist at this time, but playing with others would be fun.

 

I'm a bit nervous though about sounding bad. :freak:

 

How do you know when you're ready to get out of the back room, and play with others, and does anyone have any tips for finding like minded players at similar experience levels that wish to have some fun, and further their technique?

 

Thanks,

 

Luke.

Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 12
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Hey

 

Don't let it worry you too much. I've had some great times jamming with people who haven't played much yet, often kids of my friends even. I get something out of it; they get something out of it. Fun. New ideas. Perspective.

 

Similarly, I've been in the deep end with guys who've really concentrated on their instrument for a long time. I got the same things out of that, and sometimes, a sense of accomplishment, and others, a wake up and practice some more.

 

It's (usually) all good : }

.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Go out and play. Do it. Do it. Tab and Jack... do it.

 

Getting out there and playing is the best thing you can do. Don't be intimidated, don't think you're not good enough. Just do it. If you get smoked, so be it. Consider it a learning experience and a chance to grow personally as a player. The best thing anyone can ever do is play with others; especially with other players who are better than you. Hell, I've been lucky enough to have been doing that for years.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the responses. I guess I just don't really know where to start to find anyone to jam with and don't know anyone else who plays either.

 

I am quite nervous about the prospect of playing with others, but I know it's all good and once I do it I'll love it. I think the key is finding the right people.

 

I don't suppose getting smoked as such worries me much, I kind of expect that actually - but just don't want to frustrate the other players too much.

 

I guess if I find some people at similar experience levels, we can all sound bad together! :thu:

 

;)

 

Cheers,

 

Luke.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yup, get out there!

 

I had owned my bass for less than 12 months and had 6 months worth of lessons under my belt(having given up my pathetic attempt of becoming a drummer) when I was approached for a spot in a gigging band.

 

The conversation:

 

Drummer: "So, you play bass."

Me: "Yes"

Drummer: "So, you own a bass and an amp"

Me: "Yes"

Drummer: "We have a rehearsal tomorrow and a gig on Saturday. Interested?"

 

I was half expecting him to check my pulse...

 

It's kind of like getting thrown in the swimming pool... sink or swim?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dude, bass players (and GOOD vocalists) are generally difficult to find. If you have any local music stores, go there and check for any bulletin boards...most have them and people post stuff looking for other musicians. Try any usenet newsgroups that are local to your area. Check your local paper. If necessary, call folks who are selling any musical gear in the paper and tell them what you're looking for. The worst thing that can happen is someone tells you to get lost. Ask your teacher if he knows anyone you can jam with. Search google for music related web-sites that may match up musicians. If you have any local clubs or bars that have open jam nights, go there (you'll probably find 10 guitarists on stage, 2 drummers, and no bassist! Take your bass with you!) If you're a church-going person and your church does contemporary music, talk to one of the musicians...they may be scrambling to find another bass resource (many church bands rotate a few musicians for each instrument). Let us know what you find and how you find it. Don't be afraid to ask. You'd be surprised what you get sometimes when you're merely brave enough to ask.

 

Ideally, find a drummer and guitarist who jam together...I think you'll get the most out of it. It'll force you to rhythmically link with the drummer and melodically link with the guitarist...it'll really make you think, and you'll be surprised what you learn. And you'll probably have a blast doing it!

 

Good luck!

Dave

Old bass players never die, they just buy lighter rigs.

- Tom Capasso, 11/9/2006

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome Eberbachl,

 

Jamming with others is the best and funnest way to continue to learn your instrument. Let's face it, most music out there doesn't do justice to a solo bass, but put that bass in with at least a guitarist and you can hear and feel your contribution so much more. As for being nervous, don't be, just don't think about it. Play the music, feel the music. Thinking about it will just complicate matters. After a few years of not playing, I took up my bass and some sheet music and just "played." Granted, my fingers weren't as limber, but I read the music just fine as long as I didn't think about it.

 

I'm lucky to have a good friend who started playing guitar a couple of years ago to jam with whenever. Good luck on your search.

 

ATM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Man, if you can find people who are better musicians who want to play with you, do it. Like many other areas of life (sports come to mind), playing with someone with superior skills not only teaches you, but it forces you to raise the level of your game. Frequently, you'll pull stuff out of your ass that you didn't even know you knew.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

As all of the above have stated:

 

"Out of the pan, and into the fire.

Nothing teaches you as well as being put on the spot. Nothing learned, nothing gained. Experience is the best teacher."

 

bahhh - just get out there and do it!!!

 

Enjoy, and do what you do best. We all started somewhere. Make a point of getting better as you move on.

 

Jim

Jim

Confirmed RoscoeHead

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My best advice would be to start practicing with others as soon as you can..We had a guitarist in our band who played alone for many years and had a lot of rythm problems when he starting playing in a band...Have fun (that's what it's all about!!)
Let the good times roll
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Best I can say is get out there and do it. As much as you can, as often as you can.

 

I bought my first bass 16 years ago. I sat around the house, learned songs and practiced other odds 'n' ends.

 

A year later, almost to the day of buying a bass, a band from my home town called and said they needed me. Nice to be needed, let me tell ya.

 

I've learned a ton of stuff from just getting out there and playing. If you can find some people to jam with, that's a great first step. Try and work up some riffs and maybe some lyrics, too, along the way. If you find the right people to roll with, they'll come in handy. And writing songs with other people is a ton of fun.

 

And for God's sake, don't be afraid to go out and gig with people, whoever they are. Get out and play in front of people ,with other people. Even if it might seem like a less-than-ideal gig, just be as prepared as you can, and go out there and do it. If you weather it, which I'm sure you can, you'll be way better off down the line. And if people (audience *and* other musicians) see you toe the line, do your best and slug it out at a less-than-ideal gig, you're phone will ring. . . The word gets passed along through the grapevine. . .

 

Best of luck. Go out there and "Do it to it"

"When it comes to havin' a good time, nothing beats 'fun'. . ."

 

-- Stefan Johnson

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...