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Should I trade my 210 for a 115?


ian101

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I'm finally going to play some gigs with my new band. The only problem is that the only amp I have is a Ampeg BA-210(220 watts).

 

The gig is at a bar that holds about 200 people. The music will be classic and pop rock. I have never played a venue like this before and it doesn't seem like my amp will do it. I have a really hard time hearing myself when we practice.

 

The local music shop has an Ampeg anniversary series BA-115(200 watts) that I could trade my amp for which looks pretty good.

 

Would the 115 work better for this kind of gig?

 

I did a search and found a lot of recommendations for 410 cabinets but not much on combos. I can't afford a 410 right now so it's either the 210 or 115. What do you guys think?

"A is A"-the people of tunagialand
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I have a similar sort of amp--combo, 1x12, 200 watts. It's good for what it's good for. ;) I use it as a practice amp, & sometimes for recording, but primarily as a stage monitor. I've also used it for a stage volume amp, when I've had no choice, but the only thing that really works for that is more watts.

 

At this point, 2x10 vs. 1x15 isn't the issue. The issue is 200/220 watts vs. something with more serious wattage. (You might be able to coax more watts out of your combo by adding an extension cab, as J suggested, thereby dropping the ohms--but check your manual &/or the Ampeg website, not all combos have this capability.)

 

As J said, for now your best bet is to keep what you have & make do with it, until you can make an investment that will get you more wattage.

 

(Apologies to all who would prefer a sardonic answer. It seemed like an honest question to me.)

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As mentioned above, use what you have. Check to see if you can run a line to the PA, Mic a cab or (if the extension cab is an option, but you don't have the scratch to buy one) borrow or rent a cab until you have a good idea of what you really need.

 

Don't do a trade if you have any other choices ...I have permanent size 9 Nike indentations in my backside from kicking myself in the A$$ after making ill-advised trades.

 

They're ugly. You don't want that. Trust me.

 

Jim

Jim

Confirmed RoscoeHead

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I'm sorry to dissapoint you, but as far as i know the BA210 nor the BA115 have a line out for an extension cab. Anyway, i had one of those and really worked great, altough you need to fiddle a good while with the EQ to get a good volume/cut thru the mix. Good Luck.
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Originally posted by Farid:

I'm sorry to dissapoint you, but as far as i know the BA210 nor the BA115 have a line out for an extension cab.

Correct. No "extension cab" jack on the BA-210.

 

However, it does have a line out that you could run to the board if there's PA support (I think).

 

Peace.

--SW

spreadluv

 

Fanboy? Why, yes! Nordstrand Pickups and Guitars.

Messiaen knew how to parlay the funk.

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I called my music store and asked about that. They told me that they would make a cord for it(I know the guy). The cord would connect at the Bal. line out port of my BA-210.

 

He might have been wrong though.

 

If he is wrong, isn't there a pedal that could split the signal from my bass and send one to each cab?

"A is A"-the people of tunagialand
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Yes. If you have 2 combos then you could easily split your bass signal to both of them, or use the balanced out signal of one of them as an input to the second combo.

 

Anyhow, i was faced with a similar problem about a year ago (having a ba210 and not cutting it) and i decided to sell it instead of buying another combo. Then i put in some money and bought a swr 4004 head for 319 used on ebay and a avatar 4x10 for i don't remember how much, but they are very affordable cabs, and i definitely cut on the mix with that. Think about your options.

good luck!!

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I have come across one other option that is tempting.

 

I called a friend at the music store and he said I could trade my Ampeg 210 for an Ampeg 115 combo(the 200 watt version) and an Ampeg 112 combo.

 

This would be nice because I could use the 112 for a monitor if/when I upgrade.

"A is A"-the people of tunagialand
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Speaking from my own personal experience, and since you have a connection at the local gear shop...

 

If there is a way to trade your 2x10 combo on a 4x10 cab with an amp in the 350 watt plus range, I'd do everything to go for it now, if I were you. I have never played through a 4x10 with a 350 watt amp, or more powerful, that didn't satisfy my needs in the area of stage volume, punch, and dynamic control within a loud band.

 

I know there is a significant cost consideration in doing this, but if you can, just do it.

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I think you should be able to pull off the gig with that combo. However, it requires the band (i.e. the guitarist(s)) to keep their level under control. They best way to do that is to get the guitar amps up off the floor on crates and point them straight at their respective players' ears. Suddenly they'll realise that they're too loud and will turn down. Then the drummer will play that bit quieter (if they listen at all) and you'll be able to hear yourself better.

 

Think carefully about where you position your amp. If you can get it in the corner of the room more low end will be projected out to the audience. Tilt it up or lift it off the floor so you can hear yourself clearly - remember it's your ears that hear, not your knees! Set the style switch to 3, 4 or 5 (the higher the number the better you'll cut through the mix, as they're respectively flat, high boost and finally low cut). Add a bit of mid boost (not much) and you should be able to hear yourself.

 

If you still can't hear yourself, turn your volume right down and wait for the rest of the band to realise that there's something missing! They may even then play quieter so you can be heard...

 

Alex

 

P.S. If you're going to upgrade in the future, forget combos (your back will thank you) and go straight to 2x12" or 4x10" cabs (or combinations of 2x10", 1x12" and 1x15" cabs) with a 400W+ head. Personally I'd get a Schroeder 1210 or 1212 with a GK head or BBE/Tech21 preamp and QSC/Stewart power amp. YMMV.

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I agree that you can probably play the gig with whatyou have. And with the idea that positioning the combo is key for you to hear it (though the audience will probably by fine).

 

To me, the "two combos" idea sounds like more trouble than it's worth, though the overall deal doesn't sound too bad.

 

Let us know.

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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Originally posted by Edendude:

 

If there is a way to trade your 2x10 combo on a 4x10 cab with an amp in the 350 watt plus range, I'd do everything to go for it now, if I were you. I have never played through a 4x10 with a 350 watt amp, or more powerful, that didn't satisfy my needs in the area of stage volume, punch, and dynamic control within a loud band.

 

I know there is a significant cost consideration in doing this, but if you can, just do it.

I agree. I played out for many years with a Fender BXR 300 amp and 4 x 10 cab. The only time I had front end support was at the now defunct "The Sting" nightclub, which was claimed to be the largest night club on the eastcoast.

The last band I used that setup with had two guitarist, each with 2 x 12 combos. I never put it past "4".

"Start listening to music!".

-Jeremy C

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