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10 Bass players you should know of REGARDLESS of your age...


deanmass

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I know all of those but Carol Kaye. Man, I don't think nobody has mentioned Mike Dirnt(Green Day) and Leland Skalr (MANY, MANY PROJECTS AND GROUPS) I have to stand up for Leland Sklar and Mike Dirnt, both excellent players with great tone and amazing skill. I'd also like to add that Leland Sklar did an awesome job on the Steven Curtis Chapman CD :D

 

JDL :freak:

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Carol was on a bunch of recordings from the 60s thru today. And another bassist who ought be on that list is Ray Brown.

 

Originally posted by JDL:

I know all of those but Carol Kaye. What are you telling us? Yes, I'm sure those are all great players.

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Perhaps someone felt it criminal that not everybody knows about Chris Squire ; }

 

I'm not much for making lists unless I am cooking a feast. But there are probably a lot more names (and not all from pop and rock genres) who are worthy of study. But hey - that info is around for anybody who actually digs in, and there are so many who have excelled. So...

.
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A few more that really should be considered for the short list.

 

Acoustic -

 

Scott LaFaro

Jimmy Blanton

Ron Carter

Dave Holland

 

Electric -

 

John Paul Jones

Bruce Thomas

Harry(?) Osbourne

Larry Grahm

James Jameson

 

Maybe this should be a top 20. I aggree with a ton of the names already listed.

 

D.

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How about:

 

Electric

 

James Jamerson

Larry Graham

Bootsy Collins

Bernard Edwards

Anthony Jackson

 

Upright

 

Jimmy Garrison

Charles Mingus

Ron Carter

Ray Brown

Charlie Hayden

RobT

 

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mmmmmmmm.

 

Even though I've submitted one I'd have to agree with greenboy that I don't much believe in lists.

 

That being said let's assume, for the sake of argument, was to introduce a student to key points and players in the instruments history. Was the approach to the instrument changed after this player hit the scene.

 

I think most of us can aggreee that 1976, with Jaco's first solo album, was year 0 in the CEBA(Common Electric Bass Age) EVERYTHING changed when he hit.

 

With this as a criteria I wonder if anyone would reconsider their list. Great players all but...

 

Well, Elvis - He changed a lot, but not with his six notes of bass.

 

D.

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Originally posted by deanmass:

Geddy Lee

Chris Squire

Paul McCartney

Jack Bruce

Carol Kaye

Jaco Pastorius

Stanley Clark

Victor Wooten

Billy Sheehan

Flea

 

The recent "who is Chris Squire" question made me do this...chime in with your 10..

They are all great bass players, and most every one here beat me to the punch on a lot of other great bass players. I would like to add one thing though. While it is all fine and good to have heros and while they teach us a lot. I think it is way more important to find your own sound. You will sound so much better if you are yourself instead of a Jaco clone. I guess what I am saying is there is only so much that you can learn from others and after that you are on your own. It is your own style that makes or breaks you.

 

Iaian

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So many great bassists, so little time.

 

Too tough to narrow to ten. Interesting, though, to read all the names thrown out so far.

 

Of recent I've been spending time with Richard Bona in the CD player. Thanks to a link from JeremyC a while ago I also spend time w/ a RealVideo clip of a live performance of his. Let's throw his name in there as well. I guess he's my "bass player of the moment."

spreadluv

 

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Chuck Rainey- too wonderful to be true.An outstanding human being.

 

Steve Rodby- modest, supportive, a great arranger.

 

Laurence Cottle- the British unknown bassist's unknown bassist.

 

Alain Caron- UZEB's not-so-secret weapon.

 

Eberhard Weber- unique jazzer with no US influences I can detect.

 

Wierd list, couldn't resist.

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Cant' really think of a lot right now.... but here's my list so far:

 

John Paul Jones

Jack Bruce

Paul McCartney

John Entwistle

Tommy Shannon

Geddy Lee

Yeah,the Lynard Skynard guy

BOC guy also, Danny Miranda?

 

Oh well, you get the idea. Anything from '60s

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Hmmm...I'd say I could go top 20...Entwhistle is on it, but not in my personal top 10. Mingus is the same for me. I don't listen to or play jazz, but I recognize his significance.

 

I left 2 other personal faves off my top 10 just to make room for others who I think are more histaorically significant. Sting and Les Claypool. I love Sting's style, but he is not a groundbreaker on bass stylistically. Please do not assume this is a dig at his talents, which are awesome, most of the other top 10 are groundbreakers in some way. Les Claypool was a groundbreaker, but I really think he took what Sheehan was doing in a different direction.

 

Someone said I left off Paul McC,but he was on there...What made me post this was just basically thinking that Chris Squire being unknown just rattled me..He was a bass god in my day as a teenager.

 

Also, John Paul Jones was not on my list, nor would he make my top 20. I just don't think he did more than adequate work in led Zep.

 

2 others I would toss in my top 20 are Pino Palladino, just because I love that fretless/octaver thang, and Tony Levin, who just blow me away with that awesome slinky tone her has....

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Originally posted by deanmass:

The recent "who is Chris Squire" question made me do this...chime in with your 10..

Is he the guy with those signature Fenders? :D Taste is subjective. I could name a laundry list of Punk and Metal bassists that I think are "must knows" for the genre, but to be truthfull only a handfull of you would know who they were or what they sounded like... (except Geezer Butler. Everyone here knows who he is, and that he rulez). I never understood Jaco. Thats just me. I think one or two of the players listed are a bit overrated personally... Again, just me... However, if you don't know who Brian Ritchie is, you should flogg yourself with a wet noodle... ;)

"Suppose you were an idiot ... And suppose you were a member of Congress

... But I repeat myself."

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Well, we are way over 20 now.

 

I agree with lots of responses, not so sure about Sheehan.

 

Most of my faves would have to be session guys...guys who come in with great hooks and make a song work but who are not into "creating" a new bass world, or guys who function in one band, but in the same fashion. (Of course, I like those really unique voices a lot also.)

 

So add:

 

Chuck Rainey (he's listed, but I'll second it.)

Lee Sklar; top of the list

Tiran Porter: okay, not a session guy, but functioned in Doobies this way.

Jimmy Johnson: swooping bass support

Marcus Miller: Ever listen to Miles Davis "Tutu"? Become a believer.

Paul Goddard: Atlanta Rhythm Section.

David Hungate: of Toto and session work

 

I think everybody should know these guys and their music simply because even while sometimes being associated with a primary band...they can take a song and make it work in precisely the say way we are expected to.

 

Chop monsters and brilliant soloists have their place; but I learn a lot from these relative "unknowns" in song design.

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Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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Originally posted by Hepnurecords:

mmmmmmmm.

 

I think most of us can aggreee that 1976, with Jaco's first solo album, was year 0 in the CEBA(Common Electric Bass Age) EVERYTHING changed when he hit.

 

D.

I disagree, Stanley Clarke was out doing his thing way before Jaco, as was Larry Graham and Louis Johnson. Jaco pretty much revolutionized the fretless mid-range tone style. But there were many players (most not well known) that played as well or better. There is no doubting his talents, however!
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Most of the bassists I think should be on the list already are here and btw Leon Wilkerson was Skynard's bassist.Jason you won't have to beat me with wet noodle, I know who Brian Ritchie is he plays with the Violent Femmes.I was in a band that played blister in the sun and add it up.
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Originally posted by davebrownbass:

Well, we are way over 20 now.

 

I agree with lots of responses, not so sure about Sheehan.

I didn't list him, but he did some cool stuff with David Lee Roth("Skyscraper and "Eat 'em & Sm ile"), Mr. Big, and his new group Niacin is pretty great. John Novella on Hammond B3 and Dennis Chambers on drums. Pretty cool stuff, I recommend checking it out.
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deanmass, are you out of your mind?

 

"Also, John Paul Jones was not on my list, nor would he make my top 20. I just don't think he did more than adequate work in led Zep."

 

Think historically, no one was playing like that. Certainly not in a rock context. I'm not a real zep fan but this guy is worth a second, third and eightsecond listen.

 

Not, usually, up in yer face - It's not what we do, is it? - but consistantly inovative playing beautifully executed.

 

D.

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So, most of you seem only to be hitting on the ones who got Good Press. But ever since I've been listening to music I've been into cool bass lines and interesting musical minds. There are a lot of imaginative players out there, and not all of them were imitating or influenced by the usual suspects. Some were pocket groove supportists and some were the innovative flame-on types of their periods. Largely unsung considering their talents.

 

I hope when we are all knockin' at Heaven's Gate that St Peter will set us all straight on what was really what. I'm guessing most all of us will be mighty surprised ; }

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Nobody sounds like JPJ. Cept for maybe Ron Wood on some songs.

 

Man,he didn't even make the top twenty? That crazy. He was pretty much the only thing holding Led Zep up. Actually, only on the records. Live they were prolly terrible. Plant jumping around screaming like he hasn't had his drugs in awhile. Page just soloing outta control. It doesn't even sound like the same song anymore. JPJ was straying a little too. Ever notice how all the good songs (like 5) always have the bass leading everything? Ramble On, Good Times Bad Times, and all the others. You have to admit, he was leading the band.

 

You best put him on your list ;)

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dwalmz:I disagree, Stanley Clarke was out doing his thing way before Jaco, as was Larry Graham and Louis Johnson. Jaco pretty much revolutionized the fretless mid-range tone style. But there were many players (most not well known) that played as well or better
Man, I see some startling jumps off the logic tracks THERE. First of all, these guys weren't all running the same race. In fact, it may be argued that putting athletic mindset to something that is largely a personal quest requires some pretty odd shoehorning.

 

What Jaco did especially had little to do with Stanley Clarke, and neither of them were really playing in the pop market like the other two anyway.

 

Better? Worse? Get out your trading cards, kiddies. My Transformer can smash yours. Oooh, how revealing. Did you notice anything beyond the physical aspect of these guys' musics? These guys got tons of respect from their peers. For playing, for writing, for inspiring. And every time I see someone subtly or largely dissing one of them I wonder what keeps them us from just getting into the fantastic music deep enough to suspend all the GI Joe mentality. At least for the time the tracks are playing.

 

Thanks for giving me a vent ; }

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"Also, John Paul Jones was not on my list, nor would he make my top 20. I just don't think he did more than adequate work in led Zep."

 

Sticking with it..I have listened to a lot of Zep, and JPJ was a great member of the band, but McCartney beat him on arranging and melody, and Jack Bruce was better at riffing....I am sure I am least a BIT out of my mind... :)

 

And, I totally forgot Stanley Clark....DOH!...shows my lack of Jazz knowledge...

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i think there's a serious flaw with billy sheehan and flea on a list that excludes john paul jones. he was way more than adequate and a much better feel player than either of those two. there is a lot more to the instrument than just how fast you can play it.

 

i would also like to add the cat from jamiroquai. not the most innovative player, but he can do some ill shit, and ALL of it is tasteful.

Eeeeeehhhhhhhhh.
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Originally posted by patrick_dont_fret:

Ok, you've left out:

 

Roger Waters

Les Claypool

Mike Gordon

Dave Schools

Paul McCartney

Elvis (yes, he played a little) Presley

dude from Lynyrd Skynyrd

Noel Redding

 

And the list go on from on.

Noel Redding? I hope your kidding. Hey how about Oteil?

On the upright side: How can no one mention EDGAR MEYER!!! The guy is probably the most technically amazing bass player in our lifetime (including electric players, sorry Jaco).

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