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All time favourite bass amp combo


Learner

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Hi all,

I was wondering if any of you guys would be able to nominate your favourite bass combo amp of all time?

 

I am having trouble getting the sound I want recording bass directly into my console, I think the problem I am facing is because I am tracking it through my studio monitors. Just can't seem to get that sweet humming sound going, am thinking that must be the speakers on the bass amp that is making THE difference.

 

BTW, could yous guys also nominate favourite mics for recording bass as well?

 

Thanks in advance! :thu:

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Fave combo: PIGNOSE! Beyond that, mix-n-match ; }

 

OK. Lots of them sound good within their limitations; today if I only could have one I might choose the mid-sized Carvin RC210 or the same weight class of Ashdown. Or a Nemesis, or a -

 

<-- greenboy ---<<<<    could make a bass sing through a DI anyway ; }

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I like my Roland Cube 60.

 

Funny thing about combos. For a few weeks, my SWR was in the shop. To all my gigs, I brought an old Yamaha combo amp that I had lying around. 100 watts into 1x15" speaker.

 

First thing, it's heavy! Almost 100 pounds. Very difficult to get it in and out of the van by myself. And I had to get people to help me carry it up to the stage.

 

Second thing, it looks big! I kept getting comments from other band members (remember I am freelancing so I am always making a new impression) and even waiters at the club, "Oh my God! Look at that thing! Are you some kind of escaped rock and roller?"

 

Which is really ridiculous because my SWR rig which looks half the size and which I can carry in easily in two trips, is 400 watts and can get hella louder.

 

I like my Roland Cube, though, it's the perfect jazz amp. Bass in the gig bag, amp in one hand, I can walk anywhere! (pun intended)

 

But I do not recommend combo amps. Buy an amp top. Buy a speaker cabinet. Or two. (People always sell those cheap) Upgrade one at a time.

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Yep, mix-n-match. The only advantages a combo have are slightly less space taken up (which detracts from cab performance), and a lower initial cost. But head or rack components, and cabs, can be upgraded, taken in different combinations to different gigs, provide modular backup - even be used as PA components in a pinch.

 

Still, if you just can't swing much at first, a combo may be what you start out with.

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jeremy, what do you have against combos? granted, i prefer my stack as well, but there are some lovely combo amps out there that kick ass and are plenty loud enough for most venues. AND they are much more betterer for the in home practicing.

 

pignose.... yeeeeeaaaaahhh! ahh memories of my mini-marshal.

Eeeeeehhhhhhhhh.
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Hey thanks guys!! :wave:

 

That was great! :thu:

 

You know, I already have a JCM900 guitar amp and I am really curious about may be I should just use the JCM900 for both guitar and bass but have different cabinet for each purpose. What do you guys think? Has anyone ever tried this set up before?

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Learner, the best way to find out is to try it. It won't hurt anything as long as you don't drive cabs with lower ohm ratings than the amp section is rated for, and just pay attention to any unmusical sounds. I don't know the power rating of that amp offhand, but it could be enough for studio stuff with another cab, and if the voicing of the premap section works well for bass tone.

 

<-- greenboy ---<<<<   ben franklin experimented and you can too!

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I have become enamoured of separates as well. Easier to manage the weight. I do like the idea of a combo for your "leave it behind the end table for practice at home" amp....

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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yeah, combos are great for practice. at the studio (to use the term lightly :P ) i have the afore-mentioned acoustic 136. 200w of rediculous tone coming out of a 115. the bonus is that the speaker has to be connected to the amplifier via a cabe with a 1/4" plug so i can plug in the ampeg for a pre-show warmup to make sure everyone knows how it's gonna sound that night. then i just drag my head to the show so as not to try to carry around the 136 (which i'm pretty sure was named for how much it weighs).
Eeeeeehhhhhhhhh.
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I like my Redhead. It's a little on the heavy side at 80+ lbs, but it also has 350 watts, so it's pretty potent on stage. Also, the DI is great. If I were only recording, I'd have that B-15. But, I have heard the Ashdowns are really nice, especially with that sub-harmonic part. I think I'll get the Ashdown Ox preamp down the road to beef things up a bit.
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...All-time fave bass combo?... We-e-e-ell, I'll take #3.

 

*CHRSHSHK?*

 

Huh? Yeah - the one with the pan-blackened seabass and a side of quartered idahos, and make that drink a super-size, eh?

 

*WEEE-CHRSHSHSHKRHHHHSH! KRSHSHSK!*

 

Yeah, with a coupon! Sheeesh! Get some audio already!

 

*WEEEOOOOHSHRJDSH@%@!*

   

   

   

 

<-- greenboy ---<<<<    carpin' 'bout mis-generation

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I love my little Marshall 85W with 1-12. It's plenty loud and clean for small rooms, is great for practice, and really portable. At my age I don't like lifting heavy stuff anymore. (I still like my Acoustic 320 head w/the 408 cabinet, but geez they're heavy....)
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Hell, I'm young and I don't like lifting anything. I had the penis envy rig and it sounded great, just a pain in the ass to move. That prompted me to get the combo. But, I did shop around a lot. It was between the Redhead and a new B-15. I got a great deal on the Redhead, so I bought it.
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Originally posted by Christopher:

The Nemesis 210 is a good hunk of recycled-paper product.

Got it, love it. Also my AI Contra and my GK MBE 150E. Of course everybody knows cause I brand-name everybody to death around here...what a spare.

 

Back to the original post...what works in the studio...

 

As I recall, learner wants to get a sound that his current DI system is not giving him. I'm not a studio rat, have only extremely limited experience there.

 

A good studio amp/speaker would have to be very quiet, move a lot of air without unwanted transients and etc.

 

Seems like I read several times that a lot of guys "double track" the bass, using a DI-electronic gizmo approach on one channel and a mic'ed speaker on the other...

 

So, what do you studio guys do to get that clean, punchy sound ("leave it to the engineer" is not the correct answer, that is, if learner has a project studio he is the engineer.")

"Let's raise the level of this conversation" -- Jeremy Cohen, in the Picasso Thread.

 

Still spendin' that political capital far faster than I can earn it...stretched way out on a limb here and looking for a better interest rate.

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Originally posted by Learner:

... I already have a JCM900 guitar amp and I am really curious about may be I should just use the JCM900 for both guitar and bass ...

HELL NO. Guitar amps just aren't designed to handle bass frequencies. Even if you connected a bass cab to the amp, everything is set up wrong and it will likely sound like ass. If nothing else, the EQ section will be set up all wrong, and the bass frequencies will probably soak up those 100 watts really fast. I'd advice against it.
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D00d, some of the popular old tube jobs are in use for both bass and guitar. That should be clue #1. There is very little difference between the two "amp" sections - save sometimes for EQ and voicing, but often just EQ, as I said a few posts ago. As long as there is a right cab around it does not hurt to try it, and some people have been known to use such odd things.

 

Better do your research.

.
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I tried a Sansamp Bass Driver DI the other night. Using the book, I dialed up SVT and it growled. Dialed up Bassman, and there I was.

 

I thought it worked pretty well. I don't have experience with any other DIs, so this is a limited recommendation.

 

As to amp heads (reiterating gb's warning to have the right cab available), I am amp-poor. My Bergie is wonderful - I've powered it with an antique Carvin guitar head and a horrible Stageworks (Sam Ash) 120W PA head. While true bass heads have coloring/effects and power designed for the low, you can use other amps if they sound good to you...

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

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There are a lot of good combos out there now...SWR, Eden, Ampeg etc...

 

My FAVORITE combo amp is the Peavey Combo 115. This thing has a ton of overhead, BW speaker, lots of firm low-end and is a tone monster. The only drawback is that weighs in at 90lbs, BUT the trade-off is totally worth it. Unfortunately I now live in a condo on the second floor and cant really crank it. I have cranked it on stage and it handles every not flawlessly.

 

the new and improved: married 'ikestr'

...hertz down low....
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I know the original question was more about studio (and I didn't even try to get into how to sound better and more lively through DI chain). Since the JCM-900 is already around and on top of that it's a tubey bastid, it is well worth experimenting with. Is that the 100 or the 50 watt model?

 

Anyway, take a look at what Jack Bruce used to play with some time. Marshalls, and not that different from what Clapton was playing {I think he went through speakers like crazy though because those too were little different than what Clapton was playing ; }

 

Intrinsically, bass amps and guitar amps were often identical in circuit design and even power for quite some time.

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Learner - I have a JCM900 too - 100 watt version... I plugged into it with my J bass and dinked around for a few minutes just to see what it would sound like - just used my cheap fender 4x12 cab. It sounded interesting and definitely not bad. I haven't recorded my bass through that setup yet... so not sure how that would sound, but I actually am interested to try it... don't know when I will get a chance to though. Might try recording the line out from that amp as well as mic. What I normally play through is a SWR 350 watt head and some old peavey cab with two 15's. The main difference between these two set ups that I noticed was: my SWR had the nice big low end that you get with a "real" bass amp. The marshall setup lacked the huge low end (but wasn't too bad), BUT sounded pretty cool and interesting in the midrange - probably good for like an old-school type sound.

 

Anyway... I think someone already suggested this, but I've had decent results recording simultaneously a mic'ed cab and the line out of the amp or a DI.

 

I think you asked about mic's? I use an Audio Technica Pro25 and it sounds alright to me, especially for the price.

"...I'm working fast food now... but, hey, at least it's better than my last job."
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Yeah, a closed box guitar 4x12 is pretty much rolled off by 80 Hz. About what Bruce was playing though becka in the Those Were The Days. They can sound great in a biamp rig on top of something with low end though!
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Originally posted by greenboy:

I know the original question was more about studio (and I didn't even try to get into how to sound better and more lively through DI chain). Since the JCM-900 is already around and on top of that it's a tubey bastid, it is well worth experimenting with. Is that the 100 or the 50 watt model?

 

Hi greenboy! :wave:

Thanks for all your help! My JCM is the 100 watt model, at the moment I am using it to run my Heil talkbox :)

 

Intrinsically, bass amps and guitar amps were often identical in circuit design and even power for quite some time.

 

Right, just as I suspected. As most, if not all amp are built aiming for low distortion and linear amplification, most definitely not trying to mimic/alter the signal/frequency response.

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