Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

how the hell do i do this?


The Fonz

Recommended Posts



  • Replies 18
  • Created
  • Last Reply
Brian Beller (Mike Kneally & Beer For Dolphins)has a great article in the new Bassplayer Mag on this very subject... :thu: If you have 3 tracks to use, what I do is Mic a 10", a 15", and use a direct line... Then you can blend in what you need to find the sound that is right for you. D112's are nice too, depending on what sound you are going for... Just my 2 c's... :D

"Suppose you were an idiot ... And suppose you were a member of Congress

... But I repeat myself."

-Mark Twain

http://artists.mp3s.com/artists/63/condition_1.html (my old band)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

studio standard for recording on a desert island is 2 coconuts, in parallel with seaweed as a buffer, pointed directly at the crab... ;)

 

I would try a dynamic microphone pointed offcenter to a speaker in the box, and try moving it and tilting it and listening to see what you like the best. Or, try a condensor mic and do the same thing. Or maybe back the mic off a bit, and di the bass, and record two tracks. There are so many combinations, you kinda have to try them all and see what you like the best.

 

Hope this lame answer helps a little :P

I'm trying to think but nuthin' happens....
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My prefered set-up for bass tracking is direct and micing our '62 Ampeg B-15-N (loaded with an EV fForce-15") with an AKG C4000B in cardiod pattern, no rolloff, no pad, from about a foot, positioned so the center of the diaphram is jsut inside the edge of the surround.

 

...and of course no respectable desert island studio would be without any of these...

 

Hope this is helpful.

Hope this is helpful.

 

NP Recording Studios

Analog approach to digital recording.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i ask because we are recording soon, but that may be a redundancy.

 

we have a limited budget but decided to rent serious mics for all our miking needs. we may actually ask one mic to pull double duty and handle the kick drum (please don't throw rocks at me). so basically we get one shot at picking a mic.

Eeeeeehhhhhhhhh.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by randy clay:

studio standard for recording on a desert island is 2 coconuts, in parallel with seaweed as a buffer, pointed directly at the crab... ;)

 

Great answer professor !! Say Hi to Maryann for me.

 

Bastid - the experts have spoken. My only recent experience in a studio was DI only (into a serious ancient tube compressor). Sounded fine. Thing is that we (drums, acoustic guitar behind partial baffle, and myself) played together. I bet going direct saved the engineer having to figure out how to hide my sound. We are a non-profit and saving moeny was important, so the faster the setup, the better. The engineer got things going quickly, so it was fine by me.

 

Tom

www.stoneflyrocks.com

Acoustic Color

 

Be practical as well as generous in your ideals. Keep your eyes on the stars and keep your feet on the ground. - Theodore Roosevelt

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Despite the adding mixing advantages of having extra tracks of cab recorded bass, a top quality DI bass track has always worked well for me. See if you can borrow or rent an Eden WT-300 or WT-400. I'd be very surprised to hear that you did not like the DIed tracking sound you will get from DIing an Eden tube front end.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

DI is certainly adequate...and a lot can be done with them to make 'em sound punchy, but to my ears, when I AB recordings of myself made with a DI vs. DI+Mic'ed Cab...the DI+Mic beats it every time...

 

There's just something about dialing in the sound of a speaker interacting with real air before it gets to tape...I dunno...voodoo talk I know...but it adds this punch that you can't get from a simple DI.

 

Even a POD...which does a fine job at EMULATING the sound of a speaker in a room, still doesn't quite capture that punch. It does get close enough that you could argue that I'm splitting hairs...but to my ears, a DI+Amp combination just sounds better.

 

I'll temper this by saying that I'm not an engineer, and while I've done some session work, I'm hardly an experienced veteran.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can always re-amp when you mix, saving a track for something else.

 

As far as having one mic for kick and bass, I'd forgow the bass mic in leiu of having the bassist and drummer track together. I alwasy try to track as many instruments playing together as possible, to best capture the feel and groove of the players interaction.

 

Hope this is helpful.

Hope this is helpful.

 

NP Recording Studios

Analog approach to digital recording.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i just finished up the bass tracks for our current project last night. i used an ampeg head through a boogie 2x15 and a GK 4x10. also ran direct with a sansamp and another track into a bass pod using the "sub-dub". mixed down to 4 tracks and it sounded sweet. just what i was looking for.

its not heavy metal...more like a really hard medium-weight plastic.

 

http://www.livecoallounge.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't know from desert-island studio standard, but for me, the best sound I've gotten has been:

 

One DI track, PLUS

A second track, recording: The best-sounding (they don't all sound the same) 10" speaker in my Goliath II (raised up off the floor about two feet), pushed by a GK800RB, with a LDC mic off-center about 5" out.

 

At mixdown, the DI covered most of the bottom; the Mic'd track gave the growl and air.

 

The sound was GREAT for what I was after - pop/rock with a more "natural" Music-Man-through-clean-solid-state-amp sound, so YMMV ... particularly if you're after Anthony Jackson's sound, or Chris Squire's or the Reggae dance hall vibe. Somehow, from the little I know of him though, I can't see any of these being Bastid E's gig ...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bass POD. Love it.

Sounds really great, and no microphone hassles. Unless you can afford a good studio with serious baffling abilities, it's my favorite way to record bass. No bleed. Yay.

\m/

Erik

"To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists of breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting."

--Sun Tzu

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No doubt. I've heard great guitar tracks recorded with the POD (SansAmp as well) that sound almost indistinguishable from a good Fender Twin.

 

But compared to a good studio guitarist's FAVORITE Fender Twin? I doubt the POD would measure up.

 

They're an amazing tool though, no doubt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

oops - missed the question. Clearly I'm out of practice; sorry.

 

On no-budget ... as to mics,

 

If you are going to double track and use the mic'd track for high end and air, I wouldn't shy away from trying a dynamic (HAH - no kidding) - like a 57.

 

If you're going single track, budget-mic-only, perhaps a D112 - I've seen them in surprisingly posh places as kickdrum mics as well.

 

If it were me ... I'd DI though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...