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Breaking out of the "local" scene !?


Cup

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Yeah, yeah, yeah !!! Every band thinks (knows" they're better than what's happening in their own locality (well my band does). We've made a demo (it's O.K, but we're not so happy with it) Everyone who's heard it says we're better than every other band in the local scene.

 

The question is......Bar sending a copy to every record label on the planet, how does a band escape an incestuous shi%%y music scene such as Belfast ??? We know we're good/great (not my own opinion, but the words of objective listeners)

 

So if any of you far reaching band members have any realistic (and not million $£$££) remedies I'd be more than happy to hear.

 

Thanx....CupMcMali.

 

"this monkey's gone to heaven"

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P.S..I've just read the post, and I'm totally aware of my coming across as a bigheaded wan*er.

I'm not the best (by a long, long shot) but i totally believe in what my band's doing. So advice will be sooo welcome.

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I remember my last band- we didn't just think that we were the best, that was our guiding philosophy! Everybody thought that we were the best band on our little the scene, too. Were we? who knows... The one thing that's sure about local music is that you will never get a straight answer out of anybody.

Of course, that year and a half did teach me one thing- there is no right answer. Bands that I'ev seen break out have (usually) shared a few characteristics:

(1) They are VERY tight as a performing group. Well rehearsed, using right sounds, and pleasant to listen to

(2) They are actually entertaining

(3) They built a large following as they epxanded their geographical fan base. If you play further and further out, you should be getting more fans.

(4) People would actually show up without you asking them to- that's how to tell that you have actual fans, not just friends (ties in to the first 2)

 

if you aren't completely happy with the demo, but aren't ashamed of it, there's no reason not to use it. I've noticed that people, when they get a demo labeled as such (i.e., not an EP), they don't expect to hear the best quality recording in the industry. What you should do, however, is spend the time and money (money you'll soon earn) and get the best possible album you can, and do it soon. Spend money on mastering, graphic design, and professional duplication- it will pay off in the long run.

...think funky thoughts... :freak:
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Bar sending a copy to every record label on the planet, how does a band escape an incestuous shi%%y music scene such as Belfast ???
You don't want to send your demo to "every single label". Send it to labels that you like, that make sense for your band. You might want to concentrate on smaller labels in your area, or if you are definitely playing a very specific genre, find out who is putting out records by other groups like you.

 

Or get your demo into Bono's hands (just kidding).

 

The idea of "making it" in music is a nice dream, but it's not enough reason to do what you do. Because if you don't "make it" you will probably quit in dissappointment. What you should do is concentrate on making good music that YOU like, and satisfying yourself first and foremost. Not to say you don't already do that, but when I read guys talking about getting record deals, etc, I sometimes cringe.

 

By the way, I think the "play the local circuit" idea in-and-of-itself is a dead end.

 

You should also start to make a concerted effort to find a professional manager WITH EXPERIENCE. The right manger will open a lot of doors for you, if you are as good as you claim. Later you will need a lawyer (entertainment lawyer) who is also not your manager's lawyer. This is for when it is time to possibly sign a contract or a deal.

 

Finally, a lot of it is dumb luck, or being in the right place at the right time. Thousands of deserving groups have missed the boat, through no fault of their own. That's why I urge you not to hinge everything on getting a record deal, etc.

 

By the way, what kind of music do you play?

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I had a friend who spent almost two years writing, composing, and playing a demo tape. It sounded fantastic when he was through.

 

So he made about 30 copies and sent it to every record label he could think of. Out of the 30 he got 1 actual letter of rejection. The rest didn't even reply :(

 

Moral of the story: record companies get demo tapes every day. So in a year they've got hundreds of tapes...what's the odds of an unknown band getting a listen? I suspect most if not all of the tapes get thrown into the circular file immediately upon arrival.

 

Next moral of the story: there isn't (usually) an instant "discovery of a great new band". Bands build a following and create opportunities to be heard. Nurture contacts, exercise sound business sense. After all, this is a business. IMHO, YMMV, etc etc.

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Record labels are in the business of selling records. Show them that you can sell records for them, and you are one giant step toward being the next big thing. Keep detailed records of how many demos that you have circulated, play gigs for radio stations, and befriend the fans. The first is most important. If they can see that you can sell a lot without their help, then they will think about how many you can sell together (or something lke that)

 

But as far as "making it" goes-

Only a small majority of people can make a living in music, and only a small majority of those ever "make it," per se. I say this to you as a musician, but a business person: music is about pure enjoyment, nothing else. You sell records to have a place to stay and food to eat, but you play because it is something you want to do. Always have goals and dreams, but never lose sight of why one would play music in the first place. You will never realize that you've made it, even if you have (unless you are on the cover of BP), so play for the love, let fame and fortune be second to that ideal...

...think funky thoughts... :freak:
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Have you put any of your songs on the web...for instance at MP3.com or garage band.com It may not get you famous but it will expose others to your music accross the world and you can e-mail people your songs. For instance I have a side project, in which some of the songs I paly every thing, well I can't go ut and gig by myslef on this stuff, not unless I get a Kareoke gig, so I just send my stuff on the net.

 

www.mp3.com/myoverself you can check it out to get an idea about what I am talking about. Then send me your band URL and I will check you guys out. Hang in there and keep pushing.

 

Will

 

One life....One Destiny....

Thirteen Colvmns

One Life...One Destiny...

Thirteen Colvmns

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Matt C, I know may have come across as a total mercenary with regards to "making it" this how ever not why I started this thread. I just TRULY BELIVE in what my bands doing. I want people to hear what I (we, the Cusp) are doing, to us it's fresh music. Maybe not totally perfect technically, but there's something good going on and I want others to hear it.

 

p.s Special thanx to Connie Z !! I posted Kim Fowley a few words and I'm awaiting a reply (tho' I'm aware that I might have a beard if and when it arrives)....cheers again.

 

Cupmcmali :freak:

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Hi Cupmcmali,

 

Good luck with Kim! I emailed him to let him know I referred you.

 

On a different line of thought... I totally agree with putting your music on MP3.com. You only have to allow them to have one song on your artist page that is available for free download, and all the rest can just be "played" without being able to download. I am a songwriter and I have my songs up there, and it is so wonderful to be able to just tell someone to go to MP3.com to hear my stuff, instead of having to mail a demo CD. It saves me about $2.77 every time. MP3.com also has all kinds of little tools to help artists, such as calendars. If you work it, you can really use the service to your advantage. And it's free.

 

You can even sell CD's through MP3.com. They press the CD and you get half the money (I think). The only hitch is that it contains MP3.com advertising on the back tray card. But... another good thing is that you can include pictures of the band and promo stuff right on the same CD. It's definately worth exploring. (Just my opinion!) :thu:

 

Oh, another drawback... it takes about a zillion hours of your time to set the whole thing up. :P

 

Best of luck to you and your band. Keep the faith! Rock on! ... Connie Z

"Change comes from within." - Jeremy Cohen

 

The definition of LUCK: When Preparation meets Opportunity!

 

http://www.cybergumbo.com

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Connie Z....Massive thanx for all your help so far. I've tried mailing Kim again (hope it works out this time) I'm a self certified technophobe so the fact I even managed to get into a forum like this is a minor miracle !! I'm really interested in getting our music onto mp3. Any advice would be great. Thanx again. Cup... :D

 

P.s How do i go about listening to mp3's on the comp. This machine is an older computer (well by my brothers thinking)

 

"this machine destroys the enemy"

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