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Little things that make a big difference #3025766 01/25/20 08:22 PM
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KuruPrionz Offline OP
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This thread is for everybody to contribute the little things they've discovered that made a big difference. FWIW, I have no affiliation with any company. I may mention a product, I bought it and it worked, it's that simple.

It can be about anything to do with your musical endeavors - playing, live music, recording, mixing etc.
Consider this to be a list of helpful suggestions, there is always more than one way to skin a cat and more than one cat that needs skinning.

I'll start, lifted from another thread. This is for recording bass guitar.

Rotosound Tru Bass 88 strings are smooth and eliminate the sounds made by sliding your fingers over roundwound strings.
They are not as bright as roundwounds but still have great definition, sustain and enough sparkle for most bass parts. The playing feel is more like a roundwound string, they don't have that "stiff feel" that flatwounds usually have.
WAY more to my liking than any other flatwound string I've tried.
I emulate Carol Kaye's timeless advice about a "25 cent piece of foam under the strings at the bridge" by using a pick and my palm on the strings for some parts. I use my fingers or thumb for other things.


There is never enough time to be in a hurry...
Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3025784 01/25/20 10:26 PM
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Moving guitar pickups further away from the strings increases sustain and average level. You can compensate for the lower level easily - just turn up the gain on your audio interface, amp, or amp sim.

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Anderton] #3025788 01/25/20 10:53 PM
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Mike Rivers Offline
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Originally Posted by Anderton
Moving guitar pickups further away from the strings increases sustain and average level. You can compensate for the lower level easily - just turn up the gain on your audio interface, amp, or amp sim.


Increases sustain and average level? Shouldn't that be ... reduces average level? Otherwise, why would you need to turn up the gain? And if you're in a place where you can't completely get rid of hum induced in the pickups, increasing the gain will increase the hum. I believe that Faraday's laws still apply, even to great guitarists.

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Anderton] #3025813 01/26/20 02:31 AM
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KuruPrionz Offline OP
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Originally Posted by Anderton
Moving guitar pickups further away from the strings increases sustain and average level. You can compensate for the lower level easily - just turn up the gain on your audio interface, amp, or amp sim.


Lowering pickups can also solve intonation problems that cannot be solved any other way. Strats are notorious for this and the newer Fender Noiseless pickups have incredibly strong magnets. Having a strong magnetic field on one end of the string and not on the other causes a difference in frequency. At it's worst, I've heard it cause "wolf tones" as you play in the higher registers. Lowering the pickups will cure this condition, nothing else will help at all.

There will be better balance between the strings.
There will be less or no dropout when stretching strings.
The tone will be sweeter, with lower transient spikes, less harsh trebles and less excessive bass response.

The only downside is in using pickups that hum (passive single coils). You will need to turn up a bit to compensate and the hum will increase. I stopped using single coils decades ago.

There are many who dislike EMG pickups. I place considerable blame for that on the instructions, which used to suggest fretting at the highest fret on the two outside strings and then raising the pickup up as close as possible fro best "signal to noise ratio". I have no idea what they were thinking, the pickups are exceptionally quiet and raising them brings out their worst tonal qualities. Lowered, they can sound gorgeous and are still very quiet.


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Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3025818 01/26/20 03:28 AM
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For your studio space.

Recently I bought a couple of these goodies. Different vendor, price was lower. Worth it either way. You can ignore the mic specfic title, that is just click bait. They are all the same. It is a double layer, metal and nylon mesh.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Rockville-Pop-Filter-Curved-Microphone-Windscreen-for-Audio-Technica-AT2020USBi/303245081712?hash=item469ad0bc70:g:~McAAOSwGOVd628A

I have one good pop filter, a Blue. Got it on sale. As nice as it is, I don't like the gooseneck style and I only have one but a few mics that benefit from it.
These are affordable and can be dedicated to your side address microphones (I have 2). If/when the rubber bands fail it looks like tie wraps will work.

Now I can leave them on, they are compact and not in the way at all. They are also effective at deflecting plosives and diffusing sibilence. The vocal tracks sound much better from one simple thing.
Worth the time saved not trying to fix stuff that shouldn't be there with just one track!


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Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3025869 01/26/20 04:01 PM
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Doctor Slick Cork Grease. I gig for a living, and the cork on my sax is still almost as good as new. With regular cork grease I'd probably be on my second or third cork. (This is probably not much of interest here though).

Notes


Bob "Notes" Norton
Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com
Style and Fake disks for Band-in-a-Box
The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<
Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Notes_Norton] #3025872 01/26/20 04:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Notes_Norton
Doctor Slick Cork Grease. I gig for a living, and the cork on my sax is still almost as good as new. With regular cork grease I'd probably be on my second or third cork. (This is probably not much of interest here though).

Notes


It's a good one, exactly the kind of info I am hoping to compile. I've not gotten much use out of them and the bass recorder needs a re-pad (working on it) but I have a complete set of recorders so this is useful to me.

I didn't make it specific for a reason. Thanks for posting!


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Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Mike Rivers] #3025906 01/26/20 08:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
Originally Posted by Anderton
Moving guitar pickups further away from the strings increases sustain and average level. You can compensate for the lower level easily - just turn up the gain on your audio interface, amp, or amp sim.


Increases sustain and average level? Shouldn't that be ... reduces average level? Otherwise, why would you need to turn up the gain?
A better choice of words would have be "evens out the average level." When you turn up the gain to match peaks with the closer-to-pickups signal, the further-from-pickups signal has a higher average level, as well as more sustain.

Last edited by Anderton; 01/26/20 08:06 PM.
Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3025911 01/26/20 08:14 PM
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Here's another tip: Take advantage of the note-taking options in DAW projects. Many of them let you fill in info about the take, gear used, etc., or even let you include a picture of control settings when using outboard gear. This is also good for clearly identifying alternate takes and such.

I also store lyrics in any notepad-like feature the program includes, and give tracks real names instead of "record 1," "record 2," etc. When you come back to a project after a few weeks, these little things do indeed make a big difference.

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3025912 01/26/20 08:14 PM
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When you have to replace a fuse that's internal to a piece of gear, buy a second fuse and tape it to the inside of the gear so you don't have to go looking for one next time it blows.

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3025941 01/26/20 11:07 PM
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rhymezone.com - online rhythming dictionary. Couldn't write lyrics without it smile

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3025970 01/27/20 02:12 AM
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KuruPrionz Offline OP
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Assuming the nut slots in your guitar are the correct width for the string guage you use and the height is to your liking, sharpen a pencil and draw a line in the bottom of the slots, starting at the first string (thinnest one). As you work towards the thicker strings the pencil will get duller - perfect. Get some pencil lead on those slots! It's graphite, an excellent lubricant. Your guitar will stay in tune better.


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Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Anderton] #3025971 01/27/20 02:15 AM
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KuruPrionz Offline OP
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Originally Posted by Anderton
rhymezone.com - online rhythming dictionary. Couldn't write lyrics without it smile


Good one!!!

Also https://www.thesaurus.com for when you are looking for a different word with a similar meaning.


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Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3026012 01/27/20 04:42 AM
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Keep a aerosol can of electrical contact cleaner handy in your Home Studio/Practice place. Just a little on your cable plugs, and your jacks can keep residue from building up on them and assure you a better connection. Also can tame a scratchy pot on amps and guitars.

Dust is everywhere. Dust traps heat. Heat is your equipment's enemy.

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: AlamoJoe] #3026022 01/27/20 05:11 AM
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Originally Posted by AlamoJoe
Heat is your equipment's enemy.
ABSOLUTELY!!! Check all filters associated with fans, and clean them often.

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: AlamoJoe] #3026056 01/27/20 07:40 AM
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Originally Posted by AlamoJoe
Keep a aerosol can of electrical contact cleaner handy in your Home Studio/Practice place. Just a little on your cable plugs, and your jacks can keep residue from building up on them and assure you a better connection. Also can tame a scratchy pot on amps and guitars.

My preference here is DeoxIT from Caig Laboratories, a miraculous red mist that does wonders for things that don't conduct or move the way they should. It used to be called Cramolin Red (vs. Cramolin Blue aka PreservIT which is more preventative/proactive than restorative/reactive). One of my colleagues is fond of saying, "Everyone needs something to believe in. I believe in Cramolin Red."

Other useful substances to have around: iKlear screen cleaning fluid (especially if you do a lot with touchscreens), combined with a stack of lint-free microfiber cloths (you can never have too many). Loctite for when the nuts holding your mod wheel loosen up and cause slippage. Canned air for hard-to-reach places that collect lint. And, if you're a player who tends to lose picks in the heat of the moment, get and use a jar of Gorilla Snot.

mike


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Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Anderton] #3026084 01/27/20 01:16 PM
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Originally Posted by Anderton
A better choice of words would have be "evens out the average level." When you turn up the gain to match peaks with the closer-to-pickups signal, the further-from-pickups signal has a higher average level, as well as more sustain.


Ah! So you're talking about the average of strings 1 through 6 for a given strength of pluck. OK.

It seems that would either be something that every guitar should be adjusted so the output of each string is equal OR provides equal volume for each string OR something that a player adjusts to suit his own playing style.

Little things can be big things.

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Anderton] #3026110 01/27/20 04:08 PM
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Originally Posted by Anderton
rhymezone.com - online rhythming dictionary. Couldn't write lyrics without it smile


Can it find a rhyme with "orange"?

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Mike Rivers] #3026113 01/27/20 04:18 PM
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KuruPrionz Offline OP
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Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
Originally Posted by Anderton
A better choice of words would have be "evens out the average level." When you turn up the gain to match peaks with the closer-to-pickups signal, the further-from-pickups signal has a higher average level, as well as more sustain.


Ah! So you're talking about the average of strings 1 through 6 for a given strength of pluck. OK.

It seems that would either be something that every guitar should be adjusted so the output of each string is equal OR provides equal volume for each string OR something that a player adjusts to suit his own playing style.

Little things can be big things.


I've been a guitar tech for over 4 decades (yeah, I'm old).

No, guitars don't come pre adjusted for optimum balance. There is a reason for that, guitarists use widely varying types of strings based on personal preference. It is truly where the rubber meets the road, the strings are where the music comes from and we can and must touch them. A wound G string has a different output than a plain wire G string, both are common. Flat wounds, round wounds, stainless steel wrap, nickel wrap, coated, uncoated etc., all are different.

It is impossible to make a set of strings with varying diameters produce equal current in the inductor (pickup is almost always wire wrapped around a magnet). Many favored pickups do not have adjustable pole pieces, compounding the problem. And many guitarists want the highest possible output and will raise their strings as close as possible, making even adjustable pole pieces inadequate for balancing the strings.

Add in the many differences in response delivered hundreds of different speakers, the different styles of picking (using different styles of picks!) and in the end, one of the best solutions by far is to simply lower the pickups.
If you ever wondered why all guitarists were insane, this should provide some insight!!! Cheers, Kuru.

Edited to add: Yet another factor is that most of us also stretch strings. If we are using the neck pickup (my preference for most things) we will stretch the string in between the pole pieces or over to the next pole piece - which is set for a different string and has a different output. Some pickups have a single continous "pole piece" to make string bends more even and individual string adjustment impossible. It is a never ending battle against truth and justice!!!

Last edited by KuruPrionz; 01/27/20 04:35 PM. Reason: Addition about stretching strings

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Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3026120 01/27/20 04:46 PM
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So, the real answer is to fool around with it until you get something that works. Science can predict what form of change you can expect, but in practice, there are too many variables for a general answer. You pick the compromise that works best for you.

Dick Rosmini had a MIDI guitar that he strung up with all six strings the same, and transposed every open string to the note he wanted for the tuning he was playing in. The guitar determined pitch by counting the time between zero crossings, which took longer for for the bass strings than the treble strings. With all the strings the same gauge, when playing a chord, the high and low notes started at the same time.

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Mike Rivers] #3026123 01/27/20 05:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
So, the real answer is to fool around with it until you get something that works. Science can predict what form of change you can expect, but in practice, there are too many variables for a general answer. You pick the compromise that works best for you.

Dick Rosmini had a MIDI guitar that he strung up with all six strings the same, and transposed every open string to the note he wanted for the tuning he was playing in. The guitar determined pitch by counting the time between zero crossings, which took longer for for the bass strings than the treble strings. With all the strings the same gauge, when playing a chord, the high and low notes started at the same time.


Essentially yes. For every exception, there is a rule.
MIDI guitars are a seperate animal. Strings are really the problem with most of them - see Craig's earlier thread about MIDI guitar and the obstacles to practicality.

My caveat a few posts above about noisy single coil pickups also applies. Lowering pickups provides a more even response but reduces the signal to noise ratio. With noisy pickups, that is a real problem.
For most guitars most of the time, Craig's post about lowering pickups applies. That is the best overall that we can do in this situation.


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Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Mike Rivers] #3026176 01/27/20 08:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
Originally Posted by Anderton
A better choice of words would have be "evens out the average level." When you turn up the gain to match peaks with the closer-to-pickups signal, the further-from-pickups signal has a higher average level, as well as more sustain.


Ah! So you're talking about the average of strings 1 through 6 for a given strength of pluck. OK.


No, actually I'm talking about the average signal level for anything - single note, chord, whichever string. The reason why is that lowering the pickup reduces the level of the initial transient more drastically than the decay...it's almost like you're adding a bit of limiting.

Check out this article for screen shots that show normalized versions of waveforms with pickups close to, and farther away from, the strings. They're pretty revealing, and frankly, came as a major surprise to me.

Last edited by Anderton; 01/27/20 08:14 PM.
Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Notes_Norton] #3026223 01/28/20 12:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Notes_Norton
Doctor Slick Cork Grease. I gig for a living, and the cork on my sax is still almost as good as new. With regular cork grease I'd probably be on my second or third cork. (This is probably not much of interest here though).

Notes

The Doctor has passed on to the great gig in the sky but you can still get the cork grease here:
https://www.doctorsprod.com/product-page/doctor-slick-cork-grease

Notes


Bob "Notes" Norton
Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com
Style and Fake disks for Band-in-a-Box
The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<
Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Dr Mike Metlay] #3026224 01/28/20 12:35 AM
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Originally Posted by Dr Mike Metlay
,,,snip...>
My preference here is DeoxIT from Caig Laboratories, a miraculous red mist that does wonders for things that don't conduct or move the way they should. It used to be called Cramolin Red (vs. Cramolin Blue aka PreservIT which is more preventative/proactive than restorative/reactive). One of my colleagues is fond of saying, "Everyone needs something to believe in. I believe in Cramolin Red."<...>
mike

I use DeoxIT red and gold. I get it in both liquid and the pen.

DeoxIT Red is the best contact cleaner I've ever found. And I live in the corrosion capital of the USA, Atlantic coastal Florida where salt is an ingredient in the air.

DeoxIT gold is the best corrosion inhibitor and contact enhancer I've found.

There used to be a product called Tweak, but it's been discontinued because at least one of the ingredients have been banned (probably for a good reason).

Notes


Bob "Notes" Norton
Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com
Style and Fake disks for Band-in-a-Box
The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<
Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3026225 01/28/20 12:36 AM
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Another little sax tip.

Teflon tape. The kind that plumbers use. If you ever get a cork failure, wrap it in this slick tape and you will get through the night - the show must go on.

Notes


Bob "Notes" Norton
Owner, Norton Music http://www.nortonmusic.com
Style and Fake disks for Band-in-a-Box
The Sophisticats http://www.s-cats.com >^. .^< >^. .^<
Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3026226 01/28/20 12:37 AM
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When you can't get the mix perfect, shut down for the day. Your ears are fatigued and they need a rest. So does your brain. Walking away from the problem can be good as your brain may think of a solution later.

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Anderton] #3026300 01/28/20 12:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Anderton


No, actually I'm talking about the average signal level for anything - single note, chord, whichever string. The reason why is that lowering the pickup reduces the level of the initial transient more drastically than the decay...it's almost like you're adding a bit of limiting.

Check out this article for screen shots that show normalized versions of waveforms with pickups close to, and farther away from, the strings. They're pretty revealing, and frankly, came as a major surprise to me.


There's a lot going on between the string, the magnet, and the coil. You can't change one thing, even by a small amount, and get a single effect. But if you have a problem and you have something you can adjust, sometimes you can get the right balance of changes so that the new effect is what you want. And I expect that there are times when you can't. Ask anyone who's designed a transformer, or a phono cartridge. wink

I read the article. Your point is valid - for that particular pickup, moving the string a little further away keeps it in a more uniform magnetic field for a little longer, so the decay more accurately follows the decay of the string vibration. When you normalize the waveform, you're essentially adding gain, so, yeah, it works like a compressor when you make up for the gain reduction by bringing the peak level back to where it was using the compressor's output level control. So in theory it works. But you need to take into account the side effects. The most obvious one is a loss of level, as your un-normalized example shows. You have less signal and the same amount of noise, so when you make up for the level loss, you increase the noise. It might be acceptable, or not.

There's also how the change in the magnetic field changes the "feel" of the string - that's nothing I've ever felt in my immature dabbling with electric guitars, but I've heard famous and sensitive players talk a lot about it. I think this is really about "how I have to pick differently to get it to sound the same" that you get when you've moved along the linearity curve of the pickup.

Obviously I've been overthinking this. There's nothing wrong with suggesting an adjustment to see if it solves a problem or improves something. Just don't expect it to work the same way for every guitar and player.



Last edited by Mike Rivers; 01/28/20 12:46 PM.
Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Mike Rivers] #3026354 01/28/20 05:14 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
The most obvious one is a loss of level, as your un-normalized example shows. You have less signal and the same amount of noise, so when you make up for the level loss, you increase the noise. It might be acceptable, or not.


Humbuckers definitely help, as does finding the optimum angle to hold your guitar vis-à-vis any EMI sources. As to noise in the audio interface, the level drop for the situation shown in the article was about 8 dB. A lot of people naturally record with peaks at -6 or so, so if you're willing to run the level up so peaks equal 0, you're kind of in the same ballpark.

And to get back on track, here's another guitar tip: assuming you have software with decent fidelity for transposition, copy a rhythm guitar track, transpose it up and octave, and mix it way back in a song. It adds an effect kind of like Nashville tuning. You may need to use a lowpass filter tuned fairly high to keep the high strings from sounding "artifacty."

Last edited by Anderton; 01/28/20 05:14 PM.
Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3026374 01/28/20 07:17 PM
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Mike's and Craig's latest posts have given me another one.

Even with single coils, if you are recording guitar or bass tracks, put headphones on and turn it up a bit, you will find a quieter spot in the room. If you rotate slowly in that spot you can usually find a "null" spot where there is very little or no noise.
The trick is to play the track without moving from that position. An X on the floor using tape with the long end pointing where you should be positioned will help if you are both Artist and Engineer.


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Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Mike Rivers] #3026383 01/28/20 07:42 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
Originally Posted by Anderton


No, actually I'm talking about the average signal level for anything - single note, chord, whichever string. The reason why is that lowering the pickup reduces the level of the initial transient more drastically than the decay...it's almost like you're adding a bit of limiting.

Check out this article for screen shots that show normalized versions of waveforms with pickups close to, and farther away from, the strings. They're pretty revealing, and frankly, came as a major surprise to me.


There's a lot going on between the string, the magnet, and the coil. You can't change one thing, even by a small amount, and get a single effect. But if you have a problem and you have something you can adjust, sometimes you can get the right balance of changes so that the new effect is what you want. And I expect that there are times when you can't. Ask anyone who's designed a transformer, or a phono cartridge. wink

I read the article. Your point is valid - for that particular pickup, moving the string a little further away keeps it in a more uniform magnetic field for a little longer, so the decay more accurately follows the decay of the string vibration. When you normalize the waveform, you're essentially adding gain, so, yeah, it works like a compressor when you make up for the gain reduction by bringing the peak level back to where it was using the compressor's output level control. So in theory it works. But you need to take into account the side effects. The most obvious one is a loss of level, as your un-normalized example shows. You have less signal and the same amount of noise, so when you make up for the level loss, you increase the noise. It might be acceptable, or not.

There's also how the change in the magnetic field changes the "feel" of the string - that's nothing I've ever felt in my immature dabbling with electric guitars, but I've heard famous and sensitive players talk a lot about it. I think this is really about "how I have to pick differently to get it to sound the same" that you get when you've moved along the linearity curve of the pickup.

Obviously I've been overthinking this. There's nothing wrong with suggesting an adjustment to see if it solves a problem or improves something. Just don't expect it to work the same way for every guitar and player.




We can get far more complicated with no real effort!!! :- D FWIW, I've been a guitar tech for well over 40 years. First of all, transformers and phono cartridges are not guitar pickups, they are doing a different job in a different way.
Picking up string vibration is it's own category. Signal to noise ratio is not everything by any means. Here is a fun experiment - assuming you are using the typical .010-.046 set of strings, adjust the pickups on a Strat (any model that does not have Lace Sensors or EMG active pickups) as close to the strings as possible allowing for clearance. To do this, fret the 1st and 6th strings at the highest fret and raise all three pickups so the pole pieces are 1/32" away from the string. The guitar should play without the strings touching the pickups at any time. Not only will you lose sustain, you will have intonation problems that you cannot adjust out using the saddles. As you play higher up the neck you will get "wolf tones" that sound horrible. None of this will go away until you lower the pickups back down again. Did I mention that the response will be very uneven? The low E string will be much louder because it is the biggest and closer to the pickups than any string except the tiny high E string. This is the optimum setting for signal to noise but it cannot be used to play music.

I excluded the Lace Sensors and EMG active pickups because they use very low magnetic fields. Different animal for intonation and sustain, same story as the other pickups for uneveness.
Fun stuff, eh? Cheers, Kuru

Edited to add. In the above example, the neck pickup will be by far the loudest until you get well up the neck, then the middle pickup will be closer to center of the arc of the vibrating string.
I usually start adjusting the pickups on a guitar by setting the bridge pickup up close and then lowering it a little, maybe 1/16". Then I compare the volume of the bridge pickup to other pickups in the set and lower them to match.
That is using similar pickups in all positions. If the bridge pickup is an overwound humbucker with ceramic magnets and the neck pickup is a single coil then I set the neck pickup at what I've learned to be a safe position for eveness, sustain and intonation, usually about an 1/8" below safe clearance on the treble side and 3/16" on the bass side. Then I adjust the bridge pickup to match output or maybe just a bit hotter.

Of course everybody is different, some just use the bridge pickup and want maximum output at the expense of even response. I do what they want, if they have been advised of the options and choose one I don't care for that is their business.

I will say that in my experience Craig is correct on all counts as to the lowering of pickups improving the tone by reducing the attack transients and increasing sustain and even response.

Last edited by KuruPrionz; 01/28/20 08:49 PM. Reason: Adding stuffs...

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Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3026593 01/29/20 06:58 PM
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Here's another little thing...

When creating presets for dynamics processors and amp sims, do so with assuming a consistent input level, like -3 dB. Then normalize the input signal to those processors when using those presets. That way you won't run into a situation where a compressor preset has no effect because the signal is below the threshold, or way TOO much effect because the signal spends most of its time above the threshold. With amp sims, this is about making sure the Drive control has the intended results.

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3026595 01/29/20 06:59 PM
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When you have a bad cord, cut it in half. One of the halves will likely be good. Solder on a connector, and you have a new cord...albeit a shorter one!

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3026768 01/30/20 05:23 PM
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Camping pads. The kind the backpackers often use to cushion the earth under them when they sleep.

The make great pads between gear when moving from gig to gig to avoid scratching them. And unlike those moving blankets, they don't need to be folded.

Insights and incites by Notes


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Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3026790 01/30/20 08:09 PM
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Speaking of gigging - Gig Gloves are wonderful, and also come in very handy when you're moving. I like that you can fold the finger tip back so you can have gloves, but still work a smartphone. The original model is $39, which I think is worth it to give your hands some extra protection

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3026796 01/30/20 08:32 PM
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I have a small LED flashlight for poking around in dark areas like the back of my studio rack. It is squared off so very easy to set down aimed where you need the light. I just leave it back there, super cheap and handy.


There is never enough time to be in a hurry...
Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3026798 01/30/20 08:36 PM
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Now on my second set odf D'addario XT strings, the ones in the black package with the big X on the front.
They feel great, sound great, very balanced. They hold tune better than any string I've used to date and last much longer. Yes, they are more expensive per pack (I use the 10-46 set) but they last longer.

I will play 150 gigs this year, it looks like these strings will not only save stage time by staying in tune but actually be less expensive in the long run since I don't need to change them as often (another time savings too!).

So, I am a fan. Will be using them moving forward.


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Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Mike Rivers] #3026808 01/30/20 09:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
Dick Rosmini had a MIDI guitar that he strung up with all six strings the same, and transposed every open string to the note he wanted for the tuning he was playing in. The guitar determined pitch by counting the time between zero crossings, which took longer for for the bass strings than the treble strings. With all the strings the same gauge, when playing a chord, the high and low notes started at the same time.


Hey Mike, I was just thinking about Rosmini yesterday. He was a brilliant renaissance sort of guy, equally adept at music (studio guitarist, engineer, producer), exotic plants, Rolls Royces, Persian carpets, photography, etc. When he worked for Tascam he would bring my studio partner & I prototype products to see if we could break them. Great dude.


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Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Anderton] #3026814 01/30/20 09:46 PM
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Originally Posted by Anderton
When you have to replace a fuse that's internal to a piece of gear, buy a second fuse and tape it to the inside of the gear so you don't have to go looking for one next time it blows.


So when I don't have a fuse onhand and wrap the blown fuse with aluminum foil, should I also find another blown fuse to wrap in aluminum foil as well?

poke laugh


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Acoustic/Electric stringed instruments ranging from 4 to 230 strings, hammered, picked, fingered, slapped, and plucked. Analog and Digital Electronic instruments, reeds, and throat/mouth.
Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Anderton] #3026815 01/30/20 09:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Anderton
When you have a bad cord, cut it in half. One of the halves will likely be good. Solder on a connector, and you have a new cord...albeit a shorter one!

Yeah, and then you can cut the bad half in half and find out which quarter is still good, and then cut the bad quarter in half and find out which eighth is still good... eventually you get to microscopic lengths, but long before then, you can have a nice set of short patch cables for this and that. Just have plenty of connectors handy.


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Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Mike Rivers] #3026816 01/30/20 09:50 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
Dick Rosmini had a MIDI guitar that he strung up with all six strings the same, and transposed every open string to the note he wanted for the tuning he was playing in. The guitar determined pitch by counting the time between zero crossings, which took longer for for the bass strings than the treble strings. With all the strings the same gauge, when playing a chord, the high and low notes started at the same time.

This was the method used on the Yamaha G10 MIDI controller, which some people really loved and most people found cognitively dissonant (because it was literally dissonant) unless they played loud or with headphones. Interesting idea, though.


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Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Dr Mike Metlay] #3026861 01/31/20 03:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Dr Mike Metlay
Originally Posted by Anderton
When you have a bad cord, cut it in half. One of the halves will likely be good. Solder on a connector, and you have a new cord...albeit a shorter one!

Yeah, and then you can cut the bad half in half and find out which quarter is still good, and then cut the bad quarter in half and find out which eighth is still good... eventually you get to microscopic lengths...

I wouldn't recommend that. Half is enough, and let's face it...you always need some short patch cords hanging around for your Eurorack.

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Anderton] #3026976 01/31/20 11:13 PM
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Originally Posted by Anderton
Originally Posted by Dr Mike Metlay
Originally Posted by Anderton
When you have a bad cord, cut it in half. One of the halves will likely be good. Solder on a connector, and you have a new cord...albeit a shorter one!

Yeah, and then you can cut the bad half in half and find out which quarter is still good, and then cut the bad quarter in half and find out which eighth is still good... eventually you get to microscopic lengths...

I wouldn't recommend that. Half is enough, and let's face it...you always need some short patch cords hanging around for your Eurorack.

I was sort of being facetious. It's like Einstein's explanation of successive approximation using the example of sitting on a couch with a pretty woman. Oh well, they can't all be gems.


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Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Dr Mike Metlay] #3026984 01/31/20 11:45 PM
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Originally Posted by Dr Mike Metlay
I was sort of being facetious. It's like Einstein's explanation of successive approximation using the example of sitting on a couch with a pretty woman. Oh well, they can't all be gems.


I got that. Us edjukated syentists gotta muchuel unnerstandin.

Maybe it's different for guitar players or people who run cables on stages where they get run over with equipment cases, hand trucks, or a fork lift, but I find that most cable problems are at a connector, not in the middle. So you find the bad end, repair or replace the connector, and then your cable is only a few inches shorter than it was.

I've been accumulating cables for 60 years, and by now most of them either haven't been used in over 30 years or they have removable plugs on both ends.

Does Hosa still have a lifetime guarantee on their cables? Used to be you could send back one that failed and they'd send you a new one, but that was back in the day when nobody wanted to use Hosa cables because they failed. I don't think I've ever had one of theirs go bad.

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Mike Rivers] #3027043 02/01/20 06:45 AM
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Not to drag this out, but...a lot of cables have molded or otherwise uninspectable plugs. So if you're feeling crunched for time, there's merit in just cutting the effing cord in half, and choosing the part that still works.

Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
Maybe it's different for guitar players or people...
Wow, that's harsh. smile

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3027044 02/01/20 06:49 AM
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Here's another little thing that makes a big difference, at least to me: Color-coding tracks in a DAW. I've had a consistent color scheme for years (drums = red, bass = brown, vocals = green, guitars = blue, etc. etc.), so I can find a track in seconds within a virtual mixer. Track icons are even better.

Some people say all those colors look cartoonish. I say I have a faster workflow..so I'm sticking with the cartoons smile

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Anderton] #3027067 02/01/20 12:17 PM
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Originally Posted by Anderton
Not to drag this out, but...a lot of cables have molded or otherwise uninspectable plugs. So if you're feeling crunched for time, there's merit in just cutting the effing cord in half, and choosing the part that still works.


Once you've cut the cable, you need to determine which half still works. That takes a meter or a continuity tester, otherwise you might put a new connector on bad piece and still have a cable that doesn't work. When you're in a time crunch, the thing to do is take the spare cable out of your case or closet and use it. Doesn't everyone carry spare cables?

If you find a bad cable, put it someplace where you won't pick it up and use it again. Then, when you have time, a new plug or two, and the proper tools, decide how you want to make the repair. If you can use two shorter cables, then cut it in the middle. If you'd really have a nearly full length cable, then cut it at one end, and worst case you'll have to replace two connectors. And then you'll have a cable that you can easily diagnose and repair if it should fail again.

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Anderton] #3027071 02/01/20 01:36 PM
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Originally Posted by Anderton

Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
Maybe it's different for guitar players or people...
Wow, that's harsh. smile


Oh, now I get what you meant by "that's harsh." I didn't intend that guitar players were somehow different than the rest of us. I suppose I should have said specified electric guitar players, and included bass players, too. Because of how guitar cables are used, they tend to get more wear and tear than cables that interconnect equipment in a rack. Not only are they plugged and unplugged very frequently, but, since guitarists aren't often stationary when playing, the cable gets a fair amount of flexing right where the cable goes into a plug. Hence, my suggestion that guitar players are harder on their cables than some other users of similar cables.

No offense intended.

Also, cables that get "run over" are more likely to be damaged in the middle than at a connector. And cables that are run so that they're tripped over, causing a plug to yank out of a jack, shouldn't be.

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3027086 02/01/20 03:04 PM
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When fixing cables, shrink wrap. It works soooooo much better than tape.


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Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3027088 02/01/20 03:04 PM
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Velcro type cable ties.


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Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Mike Rivers] #3027113 02/01/20 04:59 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
When you're in a time crunch, the thing to do is take the spare cable out of your case or closet and use it. Doesn't everyone carry spare cables?


Of course, I'm not suggesting taking out a soldering iron between sets. I'm never not in a time crunch!

Quote
If you find a bad cable, put it someplace where you won't pick it up and use it again.


Which brings up another little useful tip: when I run into a bad cord, I tie a knot in it so I know it's bad. At some point enough "knotted cables" accumulate so that I fix them all in one fell swoop, which saves time compared to fixing them one at a time.

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Anderton] #3027114 02/01/20 05:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
Originally Posted by Anderton

Originally Posted by Mike Rivers
Maybe it's different for guitar players or people...
Wow, that's harsh. smile


No offense intended.


I know! I was just funnin' with you. You know, like when addressing a crowd, and you say "Ladies and gentlemen...and drummers" smile

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: Anderton] #3027160 02/01/20 09:20 PM
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Originally Posted by Anderton

Of course, I'm not suggesting taking out a soldering iron between sets. I'm never not in a time crunch!


I once rebuilt the power supply for a Soundcraft mixer on a stage at Chamizal National Park before that evening's live broadcast of the folk festival, and it was the morning after a . . . . ahem . . . production meeting, which somehow involved a lot of tequila. But part of my job on that team was to make sure everything worked. This was before 9/11 and I was able to carry my tool kit on board the plane and all they wanted was to see a business card, so I gave them one of my cards from the FAA, where I was working at the time.

Quote
when I run into a bad cord, I tie a knot in it so I know it's bad. At some point enough "knotted cables" accumulate so that I fix them all in one fell swoop, which saves time compared to fixing them one at a time.


If it's somebody else's cable, I'll tie a knot in it. If it's mine, I usually set it aside and fix it when I get a chance. I don't break too many cables. A friend of mine who used to run a fairly good sized sound company here would take a big knife out of his pocket and cut off an end right then and there to be sure nobody else tried to use it. They always had a big pile of cables needing repair, and that was one of the jobs for their interns. Because of the kind of shows that they did, their cables really did get run over by fork lifts now and then. It seems that stage hands will go out of their way to run over a cable.

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3028083 02/08/20 03:26 PM
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Of all the clip on guitar tuners I've used, the Boss TU-10 is the best.
Over the last 6 years, I've seen Snarks die or disappear. The 3 $10 tuners I bought on sale a year ago Xmas are now one and it's flaky so I'm gonna toss it.

The Boss may not be the most accomodating form factor but it soldiers on, is accurate and it WORKS!!!

As a bonus feature, it can easily be read on a dark stage or in bright sunlight. The daytime display is an easily seen light grey background with black markings.

I just got another one, "open box" from a reputable dealer. $17. Should be here Monday. Now I will have a spare so I can leave one with the main gigger and use the other one for whatever else comes up.


There is never enough time to be in a hurry...
Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3028088 02/08/20 04:58 PM
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Here's another life hack. When you buy something, often there are little fold-ins, mounting hardware you don't have a need for at the moment, rubber feet for something for which there is no immediate need, an adapter cable, the little caps that fit over jacks, and other floobydust. Put these in a ziplock bag, label it, and dedicate a drawer to these. Then if you need any of these things in the future, you're covered...and five years from now when you go to sell the thing on reverb.com, you'll have all the needed miscellaneous stuff.

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3029374 02/17/20 01:10 AM
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Originally Posted by KuruPrionz
Originally Posted by Anderton
rhymezone.com - online rhythming dictionary. Couldn't write lyrics without it smile


Good one!!!

Also https://www.thesaurus.com for when you are looking for a different word with a similar meaning.


+ 1 for both suggestions, though I have had to resist the temptation to use a word that has no business appearing in a R and B song (“ Pleistocene? WYH?”) 😊

Because a new theme or an better idea for a phrase might pop into my head at any moment (most often when I am far from my notebook or computer), in addition to these tools, I use routinely use Google Docs when I write lyrics so that I can write and edit no matter where I am.

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3029378 02/17/20 01:50 AM
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I’m a keyboard player. Maybe it is our nature, or maybe it is because I taught junior high band for over three decades, but I always seem to be the Boy Scout (in terms of always being prepared) in every band that I have worked with. Depending on how organized your musical partners might be, it’s not a bad idea to carry a few essential items that other band members might find useful too. I don’t want to have to be someone’s mother, but when it’s ten minutes to the first downbeat and you find out that the sound man needs another 57, the guitar player doesn’t have another D string, the drummer lost his drum key or the bass player did not bring an extension cord, I’d rather just hand them the needed item than deal with the club manager who is complaining that the band is starting late. Fortunately, these are somewhat rare incidents and I have rarely worked with anyone who was less than grateful or who was a repeat offender.

Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3029856 02/19/20 09:53 PM
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Very short three prong AC extension cords keep your wall warts from hogging all the space on your power strips.

[Linked Image from images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com]

Also, I love headband style flashlights so you can use both hands while working in a dark area.

[Linked Image from m.media-amazon.com]

Last edited by hard truth; 02/19/20 10:00 PM.
Re: Little things that make a big difference [Re: KuruPrionz] #3029873 02/19/20 11:48 PM
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Good one! In a similar vein...there are short USB extensions, only a couple inches, so the stick doesn't have to plug directly in to the motherboard. The USB connectors are guaranteed for something like 1500 insertions. So if you're going to wear out a jack, better an extension you can replace than the connector on a motherboard.

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