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Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 1
K
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K
Joined: Aug 2001
Posts: 1
I've always been curious how professional narrators and voice over artists achieve "their sound..." is it through the type of mic, close-miking, compression, EQ, or a combination of these (or other things)? Granted, a terrific voice is a huge start!

I'm working with an RE20, Mackie 1202 VLZ, and an Echo Gina card with Sound Forge. Limited tools, I know, but a start.

Can anyone give me some pointers in heading that direction? Whether that's technique with the tools I have, or other software/hardware, I'd like to learn - even if I can't quite get there from here yet.

I know there are no "magic settings" that "just work" for everyone, but I'd like to know what things you've worked with that may give me some directions to try. I'd really like to work on a distinctive sound that's full and rich without sounding like someone just hit the "loudness" button (gak!).

Thanks for your time,

k

Joined: Sep 2000
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I think you give too much credit to engineering. Their sound comes from them, not the technique used to capture them.

Joined: Jul 2002
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J
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J
Joined: Jul 2002
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Most of the quality narrations,like the Ken Burns PBS stuff is usually very compressed.
Sounds like you don't have a lot of options.
I would try to get as good a sound with just the mike. Experiment with positons and distance. Then maybe some light compression, 4.1 ratio.
After you get it onto the hard drive, you can EQ it to taste ahd then compress heavier.
Hope that helps.


Jotown:)

"It's all good: Except when it's Great"

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