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Yeah thanks Nika... I'll have to pick that one up.

--Lee

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Quote:
Originally posted by Lee Flier:
Yeah thanks Nika... I'll have to pick that one up.

--Lee
(She says non-chalantly... "I'll just.. go pick that one up.")

An Oxford???

;\) \:D

Can I come over, Lee? Pretty, please??? (Even if you are just talking about getting the Paul Simon cd, I'd still like to play with the toys I know you already have! \:D )


It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

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LOL Neil... yeah that's it, I'll just run out to Guitar Mart right now and buy an Oxford! \:D

But sure, you're always welcome! We can have a Paul Simon listening party!

--Lee

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Quote:
Originally posted by Lee Flier:
LOL Neil... yeah that's it, I'll just run out to Guitar Mart right now and buy an Oxford! \:D

But sure, you're always welcome! We can have a Paul Simon listening party!

--Lee
All right! Now, if I can;

  1. Get to Atlanta without driving through to Boca Raton, Fl. (parents)
  2. Find a way to keep my wife and child busy while we listen to Paul Simon and test drive that '52 Gold Top!

It could happen! ;\)


It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

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YES!

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Quote:
Originally posted by David Mellor:
[...]With A&R managers wanting an ever greater say in the finished product, to have to reset an analog desk to recreate a mix is a very time-consuming process. With a digital desk, all you need to do is recall the mix (and make sure you have all the outboard settings written down).
...but this is not the main reason for us as producing engineers to embrace full parameter reset.

The big reason is that we can now have a work that we can return to put out tools to, not unlike oil on canvas or chisel to stone. We can now address mixing artfully, returning to it to listen from different perspectives, and possibly make a myriad of small changes that define a piece of art. Or not.

The automated mixer does not rule out spontaneity; quite the contrary, it should support it. My first run-in with a spontaneous, automated mix, was on a Linda Latin Jazz cut, where I just happened to have the automation in record while I was dancing through a rough mix - an unusually good one (for me, at least, as my rough mixes usually stink). We tried to remix this cut from scratch and it never really sounded right. When we loaded the rough mix automation it sort-of came alive. So, we went from that, making small changes that the new lead vocal demanded.

This has been my increasingly my working mode of choice over the years: start getting automation in as a part of the performance. More and more, this is the case with DAW's anyway. I mean, who hasn't muted (or blocked out sections of) tracks on a DAW only to later come back and change things as a tune demanded?

I really believe that this can be done well.

George


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Quote:
Originally posted by gm:
Quote:
Originally posted by David Mellor:
[...]With A&R managers wanting an ever greater say in the finished product, to have to reset an analog desk to recreate a mix is a very time-consuming process. With a digital desk, all you need to do is recall the mix (and make sure you have all the outboard settings written down).
...but this is not the main reason for us as producing engineers to embrace full parameter reset.

The big reason is that we can now have a work that we can return to put out tools to, not unlike oil on canvas or chisel to stone. We can now address mixing artfully, returning to it to listen from different perspectives, and possibly make a myriad of small changes that define a piece of art. Or not...

George[/QB]
Yours is a valid comment on the use of automated consoles for art vs. business, GM. I believe David Mellor makes a very important point as well. To say one is the main point over the other is simplistic. We're not out to be starving artists, are we?

I don't need to tell you that we're speaking of music business. With the advent of computer control and near complete automation, the non-technical people in the biz are coming to expect faster turnaround when they ask for a demo, or listen to what's been accomplished on a project.

Compare the following:

A record co. exec. asks for a copy of the work, with a few, specific changes, right away. (It's always right away, no? Another act is currently in the room.

With an analog signal path, someone needs to get the tape reel, extract the other project's reel, find the head of a particular song, reset the console for the last mix. Then mix the song with any changes (in real time) and reverse these steps to return to the other talent's project. What are the chances any band or producer will allow you to interupt their session in this way?

Or, within my DAW, I can close one session (which will prompt me to save any unsaved changes) and open another within 30 seconds (on my hopelessly underpowered PC). Another minute or two to make whatever changes are requested, and let's say another minute or two to mix it, offline. Within 7 minutes I can burn a CD copy and have the other act's project back and ready to work. That's not even a coffee break. ;\)

Ok, so we all know that in professional studios, a combination of digital and analog gear is used. There is more to the process than simply closing and opening files. But the basic concept is still very important to someone wishing to build their own studio business. You can take the idea of one client interupting another out of the equation and the ability to quickly reset a mix, for any client need, is still a very powerful reason to work in digital.

It's only going to get worse. Every time technology makes our lives easier, the customer, client, or consumer expects you to provide your product or service faster, cheaper, and custom tailored to their needs. If you won't provide it, someone else will.

All of us want signal quality that is the best possible, no matter whether the equipment is digital or analog. But how many studios can say they ALWAYS have everything they consider the best? We make all kinds of compromises to balance art with business. (Can we afford a better console, mic, piece of outboard gear, room-acoustics renovation? Cost vs. benefits.)

Given the mess the record labels have gotten themselves in by not embracing a profitable business model for the internet age, we better be prepared for a different paradigm in this industry. I believe that model will favor the small, lean, recording studios, regardless of what we think of the technology that makes them viable. Digital mixing is the future, grim as that may seem, right now, to some of us.

What can we do, besides gripe, to ensure our love of analog technology is available within digital mixers? That, to me, will be the key.


It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

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Quote:
No redundancy, but you should probably read the previous pages (and the 96Khz thread, and several other threadswhere we've been basically establishing the idea that higher word length and higher sample rate have a critical mass at 24/48, and there's no point in buying anything higher than that)
I've read some of these threads and inadvertently started one on the Digi forum by asking if people had compared 96k to 48k. This then turned into a 75 post explanation as to why there is nothing better than 48/24. In theory, it is perhaps true -the explanations appear logical to the extent of my attention span...

...yet I pick 96k (blindly) every time with my system, so that's where I'll stay.

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