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The latest trend in magazine ads are telling us that DAT is out and CD R/RW is in/better.
Apart from the differences in the medium and their uses, obviously each one has their own role but, from the point of fidelity, I believe that the DAT is superior-provided you have a top notch machine. The reason for this
IMO is that if the two were given the exact AD/DA, I/O analog circuits, etc. the difference occurs in the writtable disc media, where there is less of an ability to remain linear verses digital tape...When looking at the specs for top players in both formats the CD always has poorer specs in the distortion, s/n areas.
Would Mr. Massenburg please comment?

Sincerely,
Phil M.

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I think he and Cookie will be on their honeymoon at this moment . . . by the way, CONGRATULATIONS< GEORGE!

Nova Scotia, eh? Any further north and you would have had to have been screeched in!

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Dear Steve:
Thanks for informing me of Georges whereabouts. However, your post states that you are a senior member. Does that mean that you have been here from the beginning or rather that you are more informed in your field. As I write this I see that it could bs mistaken as a negative. But that is not the case.
Would you comment on the original question?

Sincerely,
Phil M.

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Quote:
Originally posted by phil magnotta:
Dear Steve:
Thanks for informing me of Georges whereabouts. However, your post states that you are a senior member. Does that mean that you have been here from the beginning or rather that you are more informed in your field.


Dear Phil,
Under NO circumstances mistake 'SENIOR MEMBER' for 'INFORMED PERSON' . . . you automatically gain the appelation by
a) making thirty posts - so long as they aren't immediately after one another in the same thread, or
b) greasing Rob Kudyba's palm . . . although blackmail would work as well.

I am one of 'those' people who has NEVER used DATs for anything other than backups and file transfers . . . but I do notice a distinct difference between my hard disk originals and the CD versions I make . . . I had assumed this to be a result of the different reading protocols (IDE or SCSI vs ATAPI) and connections (DIGITAL or ANALOG) of the bios . . . of course, there's no way to run the hard drive originals through the CD player's outputs to compare the alternative conversion processes.

As I write this I see that it could bs mistaken as a negative. But that is not the case.
Would you comment on the original question?

Sincerely,
Phil M.



Again, due to my inexperience with DATs and ADATs, I must confine my comments to the CD/R, CD/RW angle . . . some people reduce their jitter on CDs by using a special green pen ; different manufacturers proscribe different backing layers, surface coatings, pheno - dyes --> you name it. Perhaps, as when you mentioned with DATs on high end machines, much of what you're detecting is the result of adopting a consumer medium (CD) to a more exacting field of distribution. Obviously, there are a lot of cheaply made CDs running around - I bought Bourne & McLoud's first CD three times (Canadian Made - like me) because it became scrambled on me - although I'm sure that wouldn't be commonplace now, ten years later.

Unfortunately, the reference to writable discs as being less linear eludes me - wouldn't that be a function of the defragmenting / conversion / burning software=hardware package instead of something generally applicable to the whole class of products? There is freeware CD burning software (sometimes coaster producing - if you've tried the Windows Media Player, although they've probably upgraded that and I simply refused to download it) and then there are mastering CD programs, that will dither, IDR, and undoubtedly be outclassed within a few months of release. Then you go and buy the next one. AHHHHH.

At the top of your post you cite the 'latest trend' - although I'm sure if you defined trend in even smaller terms you could cite adoption of Alesis Masterlink (24 bit, 96 kHz - superior to DAT?) or the Pro Tools session exports (24 bit - superior to DAT?) as 'latest trends' as well - and that is something that I'm very wary of . . . you'll find that participating in these forums enhances your appetite for gear that can help you keep up with the latest trends - something I'm very guilty of (if I weren't spending $1,500 on a rubber floor, you can be sure I'd be after an Apple 17" screen . . . and then the dual 800 G4 to accompany it) . . . and magazines - ads, especially - are quick to notify us of the latest trends because that is something industry periodicals are unparalleled at.

Long and short of it is, I would hope somebody will respond who has done both objective and subjective comparisons of the mediums - maybe not on the weekend, but I'm sure sometime this week there'll be answers to your post. Otherwise, Craig Anderton's forum will have a lot of information on this subject - you could 'double post' there or use the search function for similar threads. Craig himself is excellent at responding to newly joined members.

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Phil,

24-bit data files recorded to a hard drive (as with Masterlink or ProTools)) offer both 24-bit bit resolution and reliable error-correction. This error-correction continues if the files are burned to *data* CDs, but not *audio* CDs.

Beyond the issue of being for the most part only 16-bit formats, DATs and *audio* CDs are prone to errors.

I highly recommend the Masterlink, particularly if used with high-quality external converters and clock.

Jon

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Dear Steve and Jon:
Thanks for your replies. I dodn't think I explained the post very well. What I wish to point out is that the chemical process of the CD R/RW when used to burn audio (not data per se) from a stand alone device is less linear (from burn to read) than DAT. Although I don't have confirmation. It's based only on my obsevations of the majority of top end decks and their resultant audio specs.
Sincerely'
Phil M.

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Oh yes! Now I understand . . . CD's are rarely used for 'Realtime' recording (I think the AudioWrite Pro 8 does this, but none other that I'm aware of) . . . perhaps, though, the burning time could provide the opportunity for a better end product? That may not be the case now, but perhaps it will be improved upon.

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Quote:
Originally posted by Steven Denike:
...CD's are rarely used for 'Realtime' recording (I think the AudioWrite Pro 8 does this, but none other that I'm aware of)...


Well...ahhh...don't all stand-alone CD recorders do exactly just that...1X real-time recording like a DAT would...?


miroslav - miroslavmusic.com

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Well I will attempt to resolve this question factually in maybe a day or so. It is important enough IMO that if many people will want to send a master for CD duplication and if they can get better results sonically with a good DAT as opposed a stand alone real time CD external recorder then it is usefull info.
Phil M.

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Well, remember that CD-Rs are 'burned', or their ink is darkened, by a laser to create the '1 s', whereas 'real' CDs are 'pressed', and their 'pits' actually molded into the CD.

DATs record that information on thin magnetic tape, in real time, using spinning heads, in a dinky plastic case. They also, unless used in the digital input or output mode, use the built in A/D D/A converters, or any outboard ones you may have.

Not to mention all the different brands and types of stock, both tape/blanks, available.

What does all this mean?

Too many variables to compare the two mediums, for me.

Apples and oranges.

SOME CD-Rs probably sound better than SOME DATs, and visa versa!!



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Bob.


Bob Buontempo.

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Also Hanging at: http://recpit.prosoundweb.com

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