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Trust the French to be different...


Kramer Ferrington III.

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You know an interesting thing about France that my Dad told me.

 

He said that they lost most of their men during WWI and France has never been the same since. People ripped on them for not doing more in WWII but the fact was that so many of thier young/old/middle aged men died in WWI that the country was a shell of its former self and it didn't sport the same gene pool.

 

I dunno, food for thought anyways. Imagine if they hadn't lost all of those men, maybe they would have been more on top than they are.

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I think it's an interesting issue - we all love the INCREDIBLE access the Internet gives us to all kinds of information, not just music!

 

Yet the musicians and artists have to make a living, too!

 

I'd like to see someone come up with a way to balance both goals!

 

Re: the French. I never lived there or anything, but I like the French people I have met, and they are some of the best cooks in the world! And they have an elegant language - part of my job is to translate French documents.

 

Re: them being on top. That's all cyclical. Nations are on top for a while, and later, someone else takes over. I don't take it for granted that the USA will be "on top" forever.. and yes, I love my country. But history teaches that nothing is forever!

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Originally posted by Eric Iverson:

 

Re: them being on top. That's all cyclical. Nations are on top for a while, and later, someone else takes over. I don't take it for granted that the USA will be "on top" forever.. and yes, I love my country. But history teaches that nothing is forever!

I think they were "on top" for a good long while.

 

In school they always used to talk to us about British expansion and the Empire etc, but never mentioned France at all. But if you notice the number of places the Brits have run into the French, it's pretty obvious that the French were no slouches at expansionism either.

 

I've also read somewhere that, until 1926, Oxford did not offer a French language course. It was expected that an educated man would speak French as a matter of course. French was the world's lingua franca, which hints at a pretty massive cultural influence.

 

 

I think the idea of getting people to pay a flat fee for downloading sounds interesting, after all, it wouldn't be too different to paying a TV license (not that I've ever bothered with it)- The only thing I don't like is that there doesn't seem to be any provision for deciding who gets how much royalty money. Not unless they go out of their way to trace what ppl download and that's a bit too Soviet, isn't it?

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It's funny how you have people bust on French, but American legalese has it's roots in BOTH Latin AND French.

 

I tell ya, though; When I was in the tourism industry;

 

Some of the French ladies did not use deodorant.

 

Some of German gals smelled like sweaty dudes from a few feet away too.

 

What's up w/that?

 

Do you think they could put some instructions in their tourist manuals that it is Customary for Americans to use deodorant?

 

Anyway, this issue of free downloading does "communize" the arts.

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Originally posted by Caputo:

Some of the French ladies did not use deodorant.

 

What's up w/that?

 

I think it's because the deodorant cakes up and forms unsightly clumps of caked-up deodorant in their armpit braids.

 

 

Some of them could have dreadlocks on their legs, too.

"And so I definitely, when I have a daughter, I have a lot of good advice for her."

~Paris Hilton

 

BWAAAHAAAHAAHAAA!!!

 

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Originally posted by Sasquatch51:

I think it's because the deodorant cakes up and forms unsightly clumps of caked-up deodorant in their armpit braids.

 

Some of them could have dreadlocks on their legs, too.

Well, you're wrong. And ok, I've never been to Atlanta, but I think that Paris, one of the world's fashion capitals, just MIGHT have more attractive women in it than uhmm.. Atlanta.
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Originally posted by Kramer Ferrington III.:

Originally posted by Sasquatch51:

I think it's because the deodorant cakes up and forms unsightly clumps of caked-up deodorant in their armpit braids.

 

Some of them could have dreadlocks on their legs, too.

Well, you're wrong. And ok, I've never been to Atlanta, but I think that Paris, one of the world's fashion capitals, just MIGHT have more attractive women in it than uhmm.. Atlanta.
Well, you might just be surprised! :P:thu:

 

Yeah, France has it's share of attractive women...so does Germany. However (call it a culture thing), ushaved legs and armpits on a woman and the failing to use deodorant are a HUGE turnoff (at least for me). Seems odd, doesn't it...being a Sasquatch and all... :D

"And so I definitely, when I have a daughter, I have a lot of good advice for her."

~Paris Hilton

 

BWAAAHAAAHAAHAAA!!!

 

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Originally posted by Sasquatch51:

Yeah, France has it's share of attractive women...so does Germany. However (call it a culture thing), ushaved legs and armpits on a woman and the failing to use deodorant are a HUGE turnoff (at least for me). Seems odd, doesn't it...being a Sasquatch and all... :D

Seriously though, last time I was in Paris (late October) I was pretty mindful of all the stuff Americans say about Parisians (especially) being arrogant and sheer nasty and the people being smelly and so on.

 

Well, I didn't notice ANY of those things. Perhaps if I had gone in August things would have been different, but who knows.

 

As far as the hair thing goes, that sounds like an urban legend to me. Some women don't shave their armpits, as far as I can gather, most do.

 

And isn't THIS going OT? :)

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Originally posted by Kramer Ferrington III.:

Originally posted by Sasquatch51:

Yeah, France has it's share of attractive women...so does Germany. However (call it a culture thing), ushaved legs and armpits on a woman and the failing to use deodorant are a HUGE turnoff (at least for me). Seems odd, doesn't it...being a Sasquatch and all... :D

Seriously though, last time I was in Paris (late October) I was pretty mindful of all the stuff Americans say about Parisians (especially) being arrogant and sheer nasty and the people being smelly and so on.

 

Well, I didn't notice ANY of those things. Perhaps if I had gone in August things would have been different, but who knows.

 

As far as the hair thing goes, that sounds like an urban legend to me. Some women don't shave their armpits, as far as I can gather, most do.

 

And isn't THIS going OT? :)

Yeah, I was kidding (mostly :P ) about the hair thing.

 

However, Parisians don't really like Americans that much (as a rule), and can be somewhat rude. However, I suppose part of that is understandable because Americans can be somewhat rude, pretentious and demanding when travelling abroad. It's funny....when we travel to another country, we expect the natives to speak English for us. When people come here from other countries, we expect them to speak English, too. I've seen American tourists (particularly in Asia) commit some atrocious breeches of etiquette, showing little or no regard for local customs. However, I can tell you from experience that we are far, FAR from the worst offenders..... :eek:

"And so I definitely, when I have a daughter, I have a lot of good advice for her."

~Paris Hilton

 

BWAAAHAAAHAAHAAA!!!

 

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Originally posted by Sasquatch51:

However, Parisians don't really like Americans that much (as a rule), and can be somewhat rude. However, I suppose part of that is understandable because Americans can be somewhat rude, pretentious and demanding when travelling abroad. It's funny....when we travel to another country, we expect the natives to speak English for us. When people come here from other countries, we expect them to speak English, too. I've seen American tourists (particularly in Asia) commit some atrocious breeches of etiquette, showing little or no regard for local customs. However, I can tell you from experience that we are far, FAR from the worst offenders..... :eek:

Well, with my Australian accent and all, I probably count as an American to the French ear.

 

So I was wondering what it was going to be like. I had been there when I was 17 but I was cuter then. :)

 

Anyway, I didn't notice the Parisians being rude, but I DID notice them being extremely jaded. They just have too many tourists and they basically don't give a shit because, even if you storm off and never come back they'll never notice, really. Or that's the impression I got. Having said that, they never did anything overtly rude such as pretend not to understand us or sneer or any of those passive aggressive things I was primed to expect.

 

(Which is all very different to the attitude of Italians, who normally ask a hundred questions about where you are from and then proceed to tell you about their uncle that migrated to wherever back in 1920 and so on. )

 

So yeah, I don't know if the Parisians are rude, they certainly are indifferent. And they say that there's Paris and then there's the REST of France.

 

 

I'm not sure about the "expecting them to speak English" either. On the one hand, if you work in the tourist industry, you bloody well SHOULD speak English. And a bit of Spanish, German and Chinese, if you can manage it. Not out of some cringing acceptance of the superiority of foreigners but simply because it's good business sense.

 

Having said that, everybody spoke English to us, which was a drag 'cause I was hoping to practise my French.

 

The only guy that claimed to speak nothing but French was this guy working a souvenir stall up the road from the Eiffel tower. Now I'm sure that that guy spoke better English than you or me, but he was just being a turd.

 

Never mind, I can't think of a worse personal hell for a guy that is so up himself about his Frenchness than to sell small plastic copies of the Eiffel tower (made in PRC) to the barbarous tourist hordes, each and every day of every week for the rest of his working life! :)

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Originally posted by Sasquatch51:

...However, Parisians don't really like Americans that much (as a rule), and can be somewhat rude. However, I suppose part of that is understandable because Americans can be somewhat rude, pretentious and demanding when travelling abroad. It's funny....when we travel to another country, we expect the natives to speak English for us. When people come here from other countries, we expect them to speak English, too. I've seen American tourists (particularly in Asia) commit some atrocious breeches of etiquette, showing little or no regard for local customs. However, I can tell you from experience that we are far, FAR from the worst offenders..... :eek:

Well, the idea that many Parisians are rude to Americans has persisted because it is true all too often, from my experience and from speaking to other travelers.

 

My personal experience is, admittedly, 25 years old. We spent a week in Paris and were shocked at how different we were treated there vs. London (the week prior) and in Germany, Austria, Switzerland and other parts of France.

 

The most egregious example was at a cafe one morning. We came in for breakfast and, while awaiting our waiter, my father heard him speaking English to people at another table.

 

When he came over to us my father asked him, in broken French, if he spoke English. He flat out said no. My father indicated he'd heard the man speaking fluent English, this time in English. Again, the waiter lied to him and looked puzzled, as if he didn't understand.

 

A few, choice words with the restaurant manager and all of a sudden his English came back. :rolleyes:

 

Now, I know Americans could be more accomodating of foreigners. Living in such a vast country.. Living in a world where English is often the closest thing to an official langauge in business (which connects the world more than any other issue) we're insulated from needing other langauges. English isn't the official langauge of the U.S., but it may as well be. Meanwhile, we have large populations of Spanish speaking immigrants, both legal and illegal, and burdgeoning populations of immigrants who speak what are, to our ears, far more exotic and difficult to understand langauges like Russian, Laotion, Hindi, etc., yet few of us speak even Spanish.

 

But I'm sick of hearing similar horror stories of Parisian indifference and outright mean-ness towards Americans without so much as speaking to the American in front of them.

 

The city of Paris is a beautiful testament to the historical culture of France, but I wouldn't go there to be with people.

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

Soundclick

fntstcsnd

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I don't think y'all are reading the French legislation correctly.

 

What the legislature is trying to do is to establish a system where a blanket royalty is collected so copyright holders *can* be compensated. Under the current system (a few purchased downloads vs. many many files traded), copyright holders receive little or no compensation for music on the internet. This is much like the Performance Rights Society system we have in-place to compensate copyright holders for music used in broadcasts, live venues, etc.

 

Unless you believe that there will be some technological solution to block nearly all internet file trading, a system like this is probably ineveitable worldwide. Some (or much) compensation is a lot better than none.

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It was a different world back then, Geoff. ;)

 

Doug, if I'm reading the article right, they want to charge a nominal fee to individuals, like the fee your cable company charges for tv service, for unlimited downloads of anything without regard to the copyright holder's wishes for specific compensation.

 

"You're talking about an administered price, set by a commission without regard to the music and film economy," Miyet said.

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

Soundclick

fntstcsnd

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