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Kinda OT: Where to get nicer woods


EmptinesOf Youth

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Hey guys, its gettin time to where i want to build a guitar cab again. Its gonna be all wood with no covering and i was just curious where exactly do you buy these types of materials from. Im lookin to do it all in Radiata Pine, and then some inlays with Paduak, is this something i can simply get at a home depot or.....?

thanks guys

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Here's a few links that oughtta keep you busy for a while...

 

http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/icons/icon2.gif Luthier\'s Mercantile

 

http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/icons/icon2.gif Georgia Hardwoods

 

http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/icons/icon2.gif Stewart MacDonald

 

For finishing the backs of necks, "Bastid E" of the Lowdown Low Down Bass Forum recommended Sutherland Welles Wiping Varnish polymerized tung-oil (sold here by Garrett Wade) to me. Probably best for woods that don't require filling, like maple and koa.

 

This looks like an interesting spot, though I haven't scoped it out in a long time... check out Project Guitar.com .

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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If you don't want to pay nose-bleed prices for enough exotic wood to do a nice cabinet...

 

...I think you can use some of the more "basic" woods that is avaialble at Home Depot...and then foucus putting a really super nice stain/finish on it.

 

If you pick out a few pieces that have some nice grain showing...even the non-exotic woods will look killer if done well.

 

I have a couple of Hammond Organ speakers that came out of an L-100.

I bought them as back-up spares, since I own a Hammond L-100 organ.

 

But I was thinking about tossing them into a nice home-made cabinet and using them with my guitar amps. :cool:

 

Do you have legit specs for guitar cabinets...or are you going to just "make a box"...?

miroslav - miroslavmusic.com

 

"Just because it happened to you, it doesn't mean it's important."

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I know there are different kinds of woods for different cabinet sound characteristics. for instance when I oreded my Fender Pro Amp cabinet the maker told me that the originals where southern pine and some of the reissue cabinets where baltic birch plywood or Timblend core plywood. He said there was most definately a difference in how the cabinets sounded. The southern pine ones where warmer and had better sustain and the baltic cabinets where brighter and favored the higher frequencies. I chose the southern pine.
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Originally posted by ellwood:

I know there are different kinds of woods for different cabinet sound characteristics. for instance when I oreded my Fender Pro Amp cabinet the maker told me that the originals where southern pine and some of the reissue cabinets where baltic birch plywood or Timblend core plywood. He said there was most definately a difference in how the cabinets sounded. The southern pine ones where warmer and had better sustain and the baltic cabinets where brighter and favored the higher frequencies. I chose the southern pine.

Lee,

I might be wrong here, but I get the feeling he's looking to build a cabinet to STORE guitars in, not an amplifier cabinet or speaker cabinet.......I dunno...he's not real specific. If it's an amplifier cabinet he wants to build, it would be nuts to use exotic wood and put some incredible finish on it...as much of a beating as my amps take, that finish and wood would look like crap after about a week....unless he never moves his amplifiers.

 

A guitar storage cabinet where you can control the humiity, etc. would make sense with exotic woods....

"And so I definitely, when I have a daughter, I have a lot of good advice for her."

~Paris Hilton

 

BWAAAHAAAHAAHAAA!!!

 

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haha gee i didnt know id cause all this confusion. Well here is everything in detail..and a pic. Ive been lookin around on the internet and found a couple sites where they do custom guitar extension cabinets, and out of the pics ive seen i decided i liked pine the best. The inlays im talkin about consist of a strip of the other wood layed across the front or somewhere. here is a pic of one that has the same woods...not the one im doin though....

http://66.116.187.161/images/112cfront150.jpg

ph and this cab is not going to be moved at all really, i dont play on gigging with it, i just want something that looks nice and sounds a little warmer.

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Originally posted by Sasquatch51:

OK. That clears that up. ;)

 

It seems to me that we do have a resident cabinet-building guru here....maybe it was LP?

Yeah, I've built a few cabinets lately. I'm thinking of starting my own business building custom cabinets. I haven't tried a natural wood finish because of the abuse most cabinets get. All of mine have been covered in black tolex except for the 2x10 cab. That was covered in tweed (which is fricking _expensive_).

 

I've built 2 2x12s, a 2x10 and a 3 4x12 cabinets (two straight and one angled) over the past few weeks. Right now it's a hobby. I haven't made any money off any of them except for one of the 4x12 cabs. But that one was for someone who is not a personal friend of mine.

 

I bought the wood I use for the cabs off the Internet. It's called 13 ply Baltic Birch but it's only 13 plys if you use 3/4". The 1/2 inch only has 7 plys. And 5/8 inch has 9 plys. The reason for using that wood is that it is quite strong with higher ply count. It's also guaranteed to be free of voids (knot holes).

 

The first cabinet took me over a week to build. The last one took about 5 hours. Getting the box joints just right was the hardest part. It's a really strong joint but it's not easy to get right.

Born on the Bayou

 

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OOOPS!

 

Sorry...

 

How'd I miss where you clearly typed "cabs"??!!?? :freak: D'uuuh!! :D

 

Y'know, they might be good sources for cab woods, too, especially if you wanna go with some or all solid woods (instead of laminates) like in some vintage cabs...

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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maybe it would be smarter to start off doing one in tolex, to at least get the hang of it. Is it hard to wrap the tolex? I think that would be my biggest concern, making that look good. Thanks by the way. Im checkin out those sites right now caevan, i think some of them offer what i need for an all wood cab. Ill let you know how it goes. thanks all.
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Originally posted by RyanVollmer:

maybe it would be smarter to start off doing one in tolex, to at least get the hang of it. Is it hard to wrap the tolex? I think that would be my biggest concern, making that look good. Thanks by the way. Im checkin out those sites right now caevan, i think some of them offer what i need for an all wood cab. Ill let you know how it goes. thanks all.

Tolex isn't that hard to deal with. You just have to be careful. Take it slow and make sure you have it straight before you let the contact cement touch (if you use contact cement which is what I use). There's supposed to be a better glue for tolex but i haven't tried it because it's pretty expensive (about $40 a bottle, I think).

 

The trick with the Tolex is to cut it slightly larger than you need and trim it after you've got it installed.

 

Put the seam on the bottom. Glue it all up except for the last inch or so of the tolex next to the seam. Then overlap them and cut through both pieces. You'll get an almost invisible seam that you can then glue down. Glue the edges last and trim them after you get them glued down.

 

Use a roller to press the tolex into the glue and to make sure you don't have any bubbles as you go.

 

I would practice with a piece on just a piece of plywood before trying it on your cabinet.

 

[Edit] Almost forgot. If you're going to put tolex on any "inserts" like closed or semi-open backs make sure you cut them about 3/16 of an inch smaller than the hole to allow room for the tolex to wrap around.

 

The grill cloth on the front baffle also needs a little extra room. You should allow about 1/8 to 3/16 of an inch for that, too.

 

The best way to mount your drivers is to use T-nuts that dig into the wood of the baffle. Then use bolt/screws to attach the speakers from the inside.

 

If you cut the bracing on the inside of the cabinet correctly (leave a little gap at the top), you can make a cabinet where you can install and remove the speaker baffle from the rear of the cabinet and have a nicer and more substantial front to the cabinet.

 

If you want to make mono/stereo speaker cabinet, let me know (PM me). I'll help you out with the types of jacks to use and how to wire it.

Born on the Bayou

 

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LP, I think I'm going to have a extension cabnet to match the Brown Pro Amp. I wonder if the cabinet would be exactly the same size as the combo cabinet? I dont know if the inside dimentions could be the same?? because what about the area displaced by the amp chassis? that is NOT resonant...what do ya think on this buddy????
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Originally posted by ellwood:

LP, I think I'm going to have a extension cabnet to match the Brown Pro Amp. I wonder if the cabinet would be exactly the same size as the combo cabinet? I dont know if the inside dimentions could be the same?? because what about the area displaced by the amp chassis? that is NOT resonant...what do ya think on this buddy????

You can probably get near the same tonal qualities if the cabinets are the same. If you're really concerned about the additional resonance where the amp section normally is, you can get a tin box the same size as the amp section and fill it with spray foam. This will give you the reflective characteristics of the amp section and it will be inert otherwise. The foam in it will prevent it from resonating.

 

If you put a box in there to mimic the tonal qualities of the amp section, you can use that as the connection point for your speaker jack.

 

That cab has a single 15 inch driver, right? Are you going to use a Jensen MOD 15?

Born on the Bayou

 

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Originally posted by O'Shite Christmas:

Here's a few links that oughtta keep you busy for a while...

 

http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/icons/icon2.gif Luthier\'s Mercantile

 

http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/icons/icon2.gif Georgia Hardwoods

 

http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/icons/icon2.gif Stewart MacDonald

 

For finishing the backs of necks, "Bastid E" of the Lowdown Low Down Bass Forum recommended Sutherland Welles Wiping Varnish polymerized tung-oil (sold here by Garrett Wade) to me. Probably best for woods that don't require filling, like maple and koa.

 

This looks like an interesting spot, though I haven't scoped it out in a long time... check out Project Guitar.com .

Georgia Hardwoods is where I get my materials. I have been ordering what I need from them. If I start using it in bulk I can just drive over there (they are about 15 miles away).

 

I just wish I could find a local source for the speaker grill materials, tolex and tweed. I tried Hamrick's and Hancock fabrics but neither has what I want.

Born on the Bayou

 

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Hi Caevan, just thought it would be kinda cool to have a nice mini Pro stack :D ..I don't have enogh amps and cabinest around here yet :rolleyes: and I thought maybe if I needed I could be a bit more coverage in a large area with it? I dunno...I'm always wanting to DO SOMETHING!!! :rolleyes: and can't leave anything alone :thu: yes another 1X15 extension/
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Originally posted by ellwood:

Hi Caevan, just thought it would be kinda cool to have a nice mini Pro stack :D ..I don't have enogh amps and cabinest around here yet :rolleyes: and I thought maybe if I needed I could be a bit more coverage in a large area with it? I dunno...I'm always wanting to DO SOMETHING!!! :rolleyes: and can't leave anything alone :thu: yes another 1X15 extension/

Two fifteen inch drivers would certainly give you good coverage. Does the amp have a external speaker out? Does the external speaker out cut out the internal speaker? What are the dimensions of your combo cab?

Born on the Bayou

 

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Originally posted by ellwood:

Great sources by Caevan! also keep you eye out for Wood Workers Shows! they typically have many exotic woods at the shows that would be large enough for a guitar body.

Is there some sort of rule of thumb for working out which exotic woods would be good for a guitar body? I'm talking about stuff like "not too many knots, gives off a dry sound when you knock on it" or something like that.
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Originally posted by LPCustom:

Originally posted by Sasquatch51:

OK. That clears that up. ;)

 

It seems to me that we do have a resident cabinet-building guru here....maybe it was LP?

Yeah, I've built a few cabinets lately. I'm thinking of starting my own business building custom cabinets. I haven't tried a natural wood finish because of the abuse most cabinets get. All of mine have been covered in black tolex except for the 2x10 cab. That was covered in tweed (which is fricking _expensive_).

 

I've built 2 2x12s, a 2x10 and a 3 4x12 cabinets (two straight and one angled) over the past few weeks. Right now it's a hobby. I haven't made any money off any of them except for one of the 4x12 cabs. But that one was for someone who is not a personal friend of mine.

 

I bought the wood I use for the cabs off the Internet. It's called 13 ply Baltic Birch but it's only 13 plys if you use 3/4". The 1/2 inch only has 7 plys. And 5/8 inch has 9 plys. The reason for using that wood is that it is quite strong with higher ply count. It's also guaranteed to be free of voids (knot holes).

 

The first cabinet took me over a week to build. The last one took about 5 hours. Getting the box joints just right was the hardest part. It's a really strong joint but it's not easy to get right.

im checkin out that georgia Hardwoods place right now, just curious, which thickness did yo end up goin with? And also, im assuming i have to email them for a price but you wouldnt happen to know how much it is a sheet?

thanks again

ryan

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I've never built a cab, but I have built a few pieces of furniture. I would NOT go to home depot, look for a hardwood dealer. I would also sugjest using some sort of plywood(panel material) and you could veneer it in as fancy a wood as you want. Solid hardwood glued up will give you some trouble with warping, shrinking and expanding, unless you really know what you're doing. And don't think that "plywood" is not as good, it is(better in many ways). You will also spend far less than buying solid stock of a nice "looking" wood to build with. Just my 2 cents.
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