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Born To Run


Guitar55

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OK, I don't think there are many Springsteen fans among us, but there are MUSIC fans and so I have to make this recommendation.

 

If you want to see a seminal performance by a less-than-one-year-old band that would grow over the ensuing thirty years into one of the most dynamic and powerful ensembles ever to grace a Rock 'n Roll stage, then you should definitely check out the 30th Anniversary Edition of Bruce's Born To Run.

 

The boxed set includes a digitally remastered version of the original album. The sound is definitely improved, but not in any earthshaking manner and there are no outtakes or alternate versions. Just sonically enhanced versions of some of the best cinematic rock songs you're ever likely to hear.

 

The real treat is in the two accompnaying DVD's. One is a complete concert film of the E Street Band's first UK performance at the Hammersmith Odeon in London in 1975. They burn their way through most of the cuts from BTR as well as newly minted "classics" like Spirit In The Night, Fourth of July, Asbury Park (Sandy) and Rosalita. They also do raved-up covers of Mitch Ryder's Detroit Medley and Gary U.S. Bonds' Quarter To Three. This film captures an incredible band just as they were beginning to really gel. Believe it or not it features great guitar work by Bruce and nice interplay between him and Steve Van Zandt on "It's Hard To Be A Saint In The City. Roy Bittan's piano is superb throughout and he, Clarence Clemons on sax and Danny Federici on organ all get to stretch out a bit on the jazzy, extended Kitty's Back

 

The other is Wings For Wheels, a documenary on the recording of BTR that gives great insight into the trials and tribulations of creating Bruce's masterpiece as well as his decision to enlist journalist Jon Landau as manager, which proved to be a critical move for his career. At the end of the documentary is a 3-song film clip of an appearance in L.A. of an earlier and smaller (5-piece) incarnation of the band from 1973.

 

I highly recommend this set for fans and (open-minded) skeptics alike. It is just plain fun Rock 'N Roll at it's best. OK, I'm a fan, forgive me for gushing.

 

Dennis

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"Born to Run" and "Darkness on the Edge of Town" are two of my all time favorite albums. I didn't care much for that sound when it first came out but it grew on me. The songwriting is great and the band is awesome. There aren't many people that can sing with the passion that Bruce can. I don't see why there shouldn't be many Springsteen fans among us. Sure the guitar playing isn't innovative but it isn't by any means bad.
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Several of the songs on the album went through numerous rewrites which can be heard in different bootlegs. Thunder Road , for example, was originally titled Wings For Wheels , and had a few differnt musical sections that were ultimately deleted. Bruce also wanted to start BTR with an acoustic version of this song and end it with the full band version.

 

He also spent about 16 hours working with Clarence Clemons on the sax solo for Jungleland, singing parts to him and having him record take after take. Bruce assembled the final solo from bits and pieces of these takes. He said he'd "rather SOUND spontaneous than BE spontaneous".

 

I also found it interesting that Sirius Satellite Radios's "E Street Radio" station plays LOTS of Springsteen bootlegs, apparenlty with Bruce's blessings since many people from his organization have done interviews for Sirius. They actually play full unreleased concerts every night! Some very cool stuff. YOu can get a free 3-day pass to Sirius radio online.

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I'm a huge Springsteen fan and I bought the Born to Run resissue set yesterday when it came out. I really recommend it. I also have Sirius radio and listen to E Street Radio constantly. I'll miss it when they take it down in January.

 

What's interesting is that Monday night there was a showing of some of the stuff from the DVDs in theaters around the country. It was excerpts from the Making of Born to Run as well as several songs from the Hammersmith '75 concert. I saw it here in Charlotte in a near-packed theater and the Hammersmith concert was played at true concert volume! It didn't feel like being at a movie at all. People were shouting "Bruuuce" between songs and yelling out titles of songs. It was great fun.

Everybody knows rock attained perfection in 1974. It's a scientific fact. - Homer Simpson
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Originally posted by Guitar55:

...If you want to see a seminal performance by a less-than-one-year-old band that would grow over the ensuing thirty years into one of the most dynamic and powerful ensembles ever to grace a Rock 'n Roll stage, then you should definitely check out the 30th Anniversary Edition of Bruce's Born To Run.

 

Why do you say that they were only a year old? That particular emsemble? They have had many changes over the years. There was even a tour where Bruce played no guitar at all, just did a performer thing, like Bowie, with effects and stuff. Oh, and he had a female violin player back then... in spite of the fact that they now claim that Patty was the first gal in the band. They also claim that he never opened for anyone, but I saw him open for -everyone- all -over- New England... Sha Na Na, one of the old blues guys (Howlin'Wolf, maybe...), I think one of the more interesting shows was his opening for Lou Reed at the Palace in Providence. (They did "Fun Fun Fun"... with fade ins and fade outs.) I still remember some of the patter from that show. I saw him on Flagstaff Hill in Pittsburgh as the opener for a three act show. Buzzy Lenhart was second on the bill, and the headliner long ago fled my memory.

 

Springsteen was long an East Cost fixture while the West Coast just didn;t get the phenomenon at all. I could not talk my bosses at Pacific Presentations into booking him. They had never heard of him and they keep saying "but what does he mean..." meaning, how many tickets could he sell. They didn't understand or believe that he was selling out, because they had never heard of him.

 

I remember the piece in the Rolling Stone, "Who is Bruce Springsteen and Why are People Saying Such Nice Things About Him", which did more damage to his career because it turned people off... they compared him to Van Morrison and Bob Dylan.

 

I remember Landau's piece about 'seeing the future of rock and rool, and it is Bruce Springsteen'. And I kept saying to myself, "where have you guys BEEN?????"

 

The other guitarist in our group was from New Shrewsbury, and was the same age as Bruce. They played the same club circuit, and he turned us on to Bruce "Stringbean" early on.

 

I've got piles of Springsteen bootlegs on vynil.

 

Bill

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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The band in that incarnation (which has stayed intact - plus additions, and with a short hiatus in the 90's - for thirty years) was less than one year old: Max Weinberg and Roy Bittan joined the band as they were recording the BTR album. David Sancious and Ernest Carter left after BTR (the song) was cut. Van Zandt rejoined the band for the BTR tour.

 

I forget the details of the story, but after a particularly disastrous opening set, Bruce vowed never to open for anyone again, and never did.

 

The violin player was Suki Lahav and she also plays on Jungeland.

 

I first saw Springsteen perform in December 1975, about a month after the Hammersmith show. I've seen him many, many time since and even performed on the same bill at the Light of Day benefit shows for five years in a row.

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Originally posted by Guitar55:

The band in that incarnation (which has stayed intact - plus additions, ....

Well, sort of...

 

 

No matter, your point is a good one. The strength in Springteen as always been the live performance, and hes one of the tops on my list of live shows. I believe that he was a LOT better when he was relating to smaller audiences, but anyone who has been on a stadium or arena stage will understand why. What amazed me was that he held his magnetism in the 3500 seat rooms. Still made you feel like he was talking to you, not 3500 people. That intimacy was lost in thre move to 20,000+ seat venues, but it was replaced with a more energetic show (if that was possible).

 

Bill

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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Originally posted by Guitar55:

They're taking down E St. Radio in January? That's too bad. I had the 3-day pass and recorded hours and hours of it.

 

(Listening now: Backstreets, BTR30)

Yeah, sometime early next year, it may be February. The channel it's on now is actually called The Bridge, which is sort of an adult contemporary station. It'll go back to that eventually.

 

Sirius is great. It is well worth the $13 a month for anyone who has stopped listening to the radio because of commercials or lack of variety. I've heard more new music in the past month than I've heard in the last few years. My only complaint is that with 24 hours a day of total music, some of the stations could get a little deeper with their programming.

Everybody knows rock attained perfection in 1974. It's a scientific fact. - Homer Simpson
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Originally posted by bpark@prorec.com:

... The strength in Springteen as always been the live performance....

He has never failed to deliver. I had my doubts, though, about the current tour, until I heard some of the boots. He is doing some incredibly creative and moving solo versions and he has done about 120 different songs so far.
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Originally posted by Guitar55:

Originally posted by bpark@prorec.com:

... The strength in Springteen as always been the live performance....

He has never failed to deliver. I had my doubts, though, about the current tour, until I heard some of the boots. He is doing some incredibly creative and moving solo versions and he has done about 120 different songs so far.
Saw Bruce here in Charlotte back in June(??). I thoroughly enjoyed the show. There was plenty of banter between songs, which is something I missed when the E Street Band came through on The Rising tour. And, I've always like Bruce's reworking of his songs.
Everybody knows rock attained perfection in 1974. It's a scientific fact. - Homer Simpson
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I also got the reissue the day it came out. I'm a huge Springsteen fan and I particularly love the trio of Wild, Innocent, and the E Street Shuffle - Born to Run Darkness on the Edge of Town.

 

I've always liked the look of Born to Run cover, too, as well as the Tele on it. This album's influence is a big reason why I have two Telecasters.

 

For years I tried to figure out Bruce's Esquire's pickup configuration, since I know that Bruce changes out the pups in current guitars. It was cool to me that the box set photo revealed that the pickups looked like stock Tele pickups and what appeared to be a third middle pup in inferior photographs was actually a sticker of a night scene with a man leaning against a lamp post!

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Originally posted by ihategarybettman:

I'm a huge Springsteen fan and I particularly love the trio of Wild, Innocent, and the E Street Shuffle - Born to Run Darkness on the Edge of Town.

 

... It was cool to me that the box set photo revealed that the pickups looked like stock Tele pickups and what appeared to be a third middle pup in inferior ...

I lost interest as he grew older and changed his songwriting style. I really related to those romantic stories about kids getting out... suburban kids getting out of the suburbs to go to the city, city kids getting out of the city... that stuff reached me. All of his "I'm a Murican" songs do nothing for me. I stillgo for the live shows though. "Darkness ..." is probably the last album that I enjoyed thoroughly.

 

Yeah, I kept looking at that photo, trying to figure out what he had done to the guitar, too. I took a good look at it when he came to town (and was still using it...)and saw that it was a sticker that put me in mind of Tom Waits of the same period... almost a "Downtown Train" moment.

 

Bill

"I believe that entertainment can aspire to be art, and can become art, but if you set out to make art you're an idiot."

 

Steve Martin

 

Show business: we're all here because we're not all there.

 

 

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Originally posted by bpark@prorec.com:

...I lost interest as he grew older and changed his songwriting style. I really related to those romantic stories about kids getting out... suburban kids getting out of the suburbs to go to the city, city kids getting out of the city... that stuff reached me. All of his "I'm a Murican" songs do nothing for me. I stillgo for the live shows though. "Darkness ..." is probably the last album that I enjoyed thoroughly.

In the "Wings For Wheels" documentary he tells how he realized with BTR (the song) that he was able to deliver a more concies message in a shorter time than he had done on earlier songs like Rosalita. I kind of liked the long epic tunes myself. E Street Shuffle has always been my favorite album. Like IHATE GARY..says, Shuffle, BTR and Darkness are killer discs.
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It's the romance, vision, and stylistic risk taking in those discs that appeal to me, not song length. "Meeting Across the River" and "She's the One" are both three-minute songs, and they are very different, one having a jazzy bent and the other being a Bo Diddley-beat rocker.

 

Those three discs are complete cycle, starting with the youthful idealism of "Wild, Innocent" and ending up with the open-eyed realism of "Darkness", with "Born to Run" serving as the perfect bridge between the two other albums.

 

I often find myself comparing this trio with what I believe are Tom Petty's strongest string of albums: "Hard Promises", "Long After Dark", and "Damn the Torpedoes". In both cases, these jewels came one after another and eclipsed both what came before and what has arrived since. Don't get me wrong - I feel the rest of their catalogues are good and often great, but they don't reach the heights that these six albums did.

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I have a confession to make...(cringe & squirm)...I don't always listen to music because o the guitar. (Sweat & grovel) Sometimes I even listen to music that doesn't have any guitars at all! I know, I know, I'm a real sick-o, but I can't find a 12 step group that deals with the problem, and I can't afford a shrink, so here I am(head hanging in shame).

One of the artists that I like for other reasons than the guitar is Bruce Springsteen. I have loved his music since I first heard the "Wild, The Innocent, & The E Street Shuffle" album. I was blown away by "Born To Run", particularly "Jungleland", and I even liked some of "The River". When "Tunnel of Love" came out, it was about the same time I was dealing with my divorce, and "Two Steps Forward" & "Brilliant Disguise" hit me right where I was living.

 

When "The Rising" came out, I thought it was the best artistic expression of grief over 9/11 I heard up to that time(Alan Jacksons's song took it's place later one). While I don't particularly agree with Bruce's politics, I have no choice but to validate his status as an artist of great skill and accomplishment. I don't see how anyone can say otherwise.

Always remember that you�re unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

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There's music that DOESN'T have guitars in it????

 

Really, it's good to see you Springsteen fans come out of the woodwork.

 

Check this out: I sometimes post on a Springsteen message board when there is something interesting to talk about such as this BTR30 release. Well, someone else on that forum who I don't even know, sent me two FREE tix for tonight's show at the Continental Arena in NJ!! Pretty cool, eh?

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Picker, I also don't always listen to music because of the guitar, drums, or any other one instrument. In fact, even though I'm a Springsteen fan, I'm usually not crazy about his guitar solos; I'm more a fan of his overall sound and message (and, sorry, I do agree with his politics). I like hearing groups produce a unified sound and enjoy looking at the interaction between the various parts rather than focussing on just one aspect.
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While I'm not a 'fan', I certainly can appreciate Bruce Sprigsteen's music and talent, probably moreso now than when I was young. And I always knew that his live band was seriously together, musicians of a cut above many.

 

I like his early/middle stuff more than his later material, but I wind up saying that about a lot of folks!

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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Well, it turned out to be a great show. The sound was excellent. Bruce opened the show playing a harp into a bullet mic, then singing into the bullet for a very distorted vocal sound on "Born In The USA". It was an interesting approach, but many people could not even identify the song, probably his one mis-step of the night. He performed songs on acoustic guitar, electric guitar (a beautiful Gretsch White Falcon), resonator, piano, electric piano and autoharp. Highlights included "Meeting Across The River" (the first time he has ever performed it solo), "The Rising", "Thundercrack", "Born To Run" and "The Promised Land". He told some great stories and seemed to really enjoy himself.
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After seeing "Rent", I had the notion that Born To Run would be palatable as a Broadway-style show. Kinda anti-Rock n Roll, I know. But hey, somebody run with it!
Everybody knows rock attained perfection in 1974. It's a scientific fact. - Homer Simpson
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