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Everybody should love the CARS:


Dr. Ellwood

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I like their early and middle stuff best, later on they started to sound too middle-of-the-road, MTV fluff for me.

 

I'll tell you, I always dug Elliot Easton's playing and tone, he always managed to find just the right part for anything, often not what would be expected. He was well versed in a number of classic styles and tones- rock 'n' roll, rockabilly, surf/instrumental, r&b, country- and squeezed a lot of rootsy flavored playing into songs that were trying real hard to be anything BUT rootsy and classic!

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

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Lots of bands produce records where some mediocre thing becomes a hit while their great stuff languishes in obscurity. The Cars are one band where everything they did of any quality became hits - all their "non-hit" material was clearly filler. Great business decisions on the part of their management.

I used to think I was Libertarian. Until I saw their platform; now I know I'm no more Libertarian than I am RepubliCrat or neoCON or Liberal or Socialist.

 

This ain't no track meet; this is football.

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Originally posted by Dances With Werewolves:

...I'll tell you, I always dug Elliot Easton's playing and tone, he always managed to find just the right part for anything, often not what would be expected. He was well versed in a number of classic styles and tones- rock 'n' roll, rockabilly, surf/instrumental, r&b, country- and squeezed a lot of rootsy flavored playing into songs that were trying real hard to be anything BUT rootsy and classic!

And he's a lefty player :D ...

 

The Cars were the shiznit. I was in Boston in the '80s and they were the "hometown boys make good", like Aerosmith, J. Geils, 'Til Tuesday, and, of course, Boston.

 

 

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Yep on everything you guys! :D Elliot was great, and that live BandMaster sound and the LP where right on for their sound. The early and VERY effective tasteful Moog stabs where just so together arrancement wise I always listened closely. They did a German concert thats on DVD now that is just great and shows that tightness and taste live.
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Originally posted by Bluesape:

I'm 50, and I can barely remember them - who were they, Old One? :D:eek::D

Reif..you are probably pokin me again BUT if your NOT ... go back and listen to Easton that little lefty pup can play, ya know what I really liked about him was his complete concentration on being a part of the band... listen to how his parts fit in while the other guys are on solos or vocals.
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Originally posted by chad:

Originally posted by Dances With Werewolves:

...I'll tell you, I always dug Elliot Easton's playing and tone, he always managed to find just the right part for anything, often not what would be expected. He was well versed in a number of classic styles and tones- rock 'n' roll, rockabilly, surf/instrumental, r&b, country- and squeezed a lot of rootsy flavored playing into songs that were trying real hard to be anything BUT rootsy and classic!

And he's a lefty player :D ...

 

The Cars were the shiznit. I was in Boston in the '80s and they were the "hometown boys make good", like Aerosmith, J. Geils, 'Til Tuesday, and, of course, Boston.

Dont EVEN start me up on J.Giels FRIGGIN GREAT..they where so popular in Detroit they called em Detroits number one party band!! We warmed them up more than once at the old Grandie Ball Room and the East Town Theatre. Backstage I remember everyone talked to them and they where great but I never heard J. Giles himself say one word to anyone. Peter Wolf was totally nuts on and off stage and tons of fun and man just quick as a switch blade smart!!!
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I thought Easton had some interesting licks and quaint phrasing.. not much else.

 

You can't save any band once they sign and start to cash their checks. The Cars... went where they were meant to go.... away.

 

IMO..

thank you.

I still think guitars are like shoes, but louder.

 

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I liked the Cars quite a bit when they first hit, but that kind of music just doesn't puch my buttons these days. Its only a matter of personal taste, but I rarely listen to any of the late 70's-early 80's music anymore. Even though most people always keep there college/party age music close to there heart, I just don't think that way.

 

Part of it is it was around that age that I became exposed to more music than what was typically played on pop music stations. Thats when I got exposed to to a huge degree on classical, jazz, and blues. Ever since then, most pop music just doesn't click with me. Every once in a while something catches my ear but doesn't hold my ear for long.

 

Elliot Easton is a great guitarist and The Cars had some great pop tunes, but I would never go out of my way these days to hear them. I don't dislike or want to disparage the music, I just don't find it having much depth. Some of their later stuff didn't have the edge that the first couple albums had either.

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Originally posted by ellwood:

Originally posted by Bluesape:

I'm 50, and I can barely remember them - who were they, Old One? :D:eek::D

Reif..you are probably pokin me again BUT if your NOT ... go back and listen to Easton that little lefty pup can play, ya know what I really liked about him was his complete concentration on being a part of the band... listen to how his parts fit in while the other guys are on solos or vocals.
Yeah, I'm joshin', but I ca't think of a solo of Easton's that caught my attention.
Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
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Gruupi yes I understand where you are comming from. There where elements inside of their music that where more valid and interesting than just college party days music. I was very interested in the other styles of music you mentioned also. When I went inside of their music I was a pretty good guitar player and a better piano player and found more depth in their arrangements than quickly met the eye. To this day I listen to some of their material and marvel at the timing and fluidity of their writing. I can take apart the things that Chicago did the same way. Eastons background comes out within the music (I think it was Caevan who meantioned it first) he mixed his wide base of style in and out with such timing and complexity that it appears almost to not fit but always fits. You know since I have been on the Forum here I have went back and listened to so many of the groups mentioned here that I quickly dismissed and tried to listen INSIDE it armed with the knowledge of the instrument that I have developed over the years and NOW many times I understand what was going on.
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I found them kind of a bubble gum band - The Archies with decent players. I know that's harsh, but they just never were a band I drew inspiration from - when they were around, I was focused on my influences.
Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
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Originally posted by Bluesape:

Originally posted by ellwood:

Originally posted by Bluesape:

I'm 50, and I can barely remember them - who were they, Old One? :D:eek::D

Reif..you are probably pokin me again BUT if your NOT ... go back and listen to Easton that little lefty pup can play, ya know what I really liked about him was his complete concentration on being a part of the band... listen to how his parts fit in while the other guys are on solos or vocals.
Yeah, I'm joshin', but I ca't think of a solo of Easton's that caught my attention.
Reif, go back man... sit down plug in and listen..cop with him... tell me what you think.
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Originally posted by Bluesape:

OK - maybe there's something there I've missed all these years. I certainly respect your endorsement of him, so I'll have to give him more attention.

Excellant Reif.. ya I bet your influences where alot of mine also..even with the age difference.. where the respect comes in is when you have to sit down and cop another guys stuff. Not just sorta kinda close I mean COP it! All of a sudden you say WAIT a sec! tryin to cop it in meter and in and out of the mix try to do the interplay between the keyboards and you on guitar and get it really right. Ill tell ya what its kept me centered on my playing alot of times. There are things he does that only very good country players do or jazz players do and folk chops and classical technique ALL within the context of a marketable product. Remember these things that came out of his experience ARE his innovations within the context of their music.
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Originally posted by Dances With Werewolves:

I like their early and middle stuff best, later on they started to sound too middle-of-the-road, MTV fluff for me.

 

I'll tell you, I always dug Elliot Easton's playing and tone, he always managed to find just the right part for anything, often not what would be expected. He was well versed in a number of classic styles and tones- rock 'n' roll, rockabilly, surf/instrumental, r&b, country- and squeezed a lot of rootsy flavored playing into songs that were trying real hard to be anything BUT rootsy and classic!

My first band in highschool played Just What I Needed and You Might Think. I still think the former has one of the tastiest solos around. Not difficult.. just right! ;):thu:

 

I'm a fan of a lot of their music. The Heartbeat City album has a lot of good music, and they were one band that really played with videos back when they were something conceptual and not simply a vehicle to put the prettiest face on your band. The Cars were fun music. And damn! I only wish I had a shot at Paulina back then! ;)

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You distractors are nuts. All of my tone experience (in other words, the tone I strive for when I solo) comes out of Elliot Easton, Carlos, EC, Brian May, and George. EE could just burn for 8 or 16 bars; whatever the song needed. He was in and out just perfect. Some cats dog out the later albums, but listen to the solo in 'Touch and Go' for example. I'd put it up there with Stairway and Reeling easily. Elliot was a musical solo genius!
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