Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

For the guys who sing and play in a band..


MadStrum

Recommended Posts

Do you find that wearing a heavy guitar tends to interfere with your singing?

I find that there's a difference between me singing with a acoustic for 1 hour and electric for 1 hour... with the electric my voice gets tired and hoarse easily... why is this so?

 

Pier.

* Godin Freeway Classic * Seagull M6 * Timothy S10J
Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 21
  • Created
  • Last Reply
I accidentally tried something different to warm up for a gig last night. This may be helpful or not. On the way to the club, I sang along with the radio. When we got started, I felt warmed up already and didn't strain so much. Is that (radio or CD warmup) an option, MadStrum?
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I use a lighter guitar most of the time. I haven't noticed a correlation between weight and vocal power, but it may be there. If I bring my V or ash bodied Strat to a gig, it's usually for a set at the most. I'm a sizable guy, and haven't found the guitar's weight to be a singing issue, just a comfort factor.
Never a DUH! moment! Well, almost never. OK, OK! Sometimes never!
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I dunno ... I'm using a Godin LGSP90... I think that the fact that I'm a skinny guy causes this..I brought my acoustic to band practice today and true enough, I was only slightly hoarse after 2 hours of jaming..

 

Pier.

* Godin Freeway Classic * Seagull M6 * Timothy S10J
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it might just be the fact that your electrics are heavier than acoustics and when your jammin you have all that weight on your neck and/or shoulder so it could be the weight but I play in my house by myself most of the time and i just play along with whatevers on the radio or whatever cd I left in the stereo. Could it be the type of music you play?
IT'S ALL GOOD IN GA
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, I dont really have that problem at all. i sling an LP goldtop (pretty heavy guitar) when im singin, but I actually feel better wingin with a heavier guitar. The lighter guitars swing around too much on me, whereas the LP just sits there in one spot, and only moves when i make it move.
hot girls, fast cars, and even louder guitars
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by LPCustom:

As someone else suggested you may just be singing louder when playing the electrics. You probably aren't playing the acoustic as loudly as the electric. So you don't have to put as much into your singing to be heard.

That can't be coz my lead guitarist is wailing away too :D

 

Pier.

* Godin Freeway Classic * Seagull M6 * Timothy S10J
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I sang and played guita (rythm and lead) and piano in bands,and never noticed a differnce when strapping a guitar and not. I would typically play guitar for a set and then switch off for a set, so I never had the guitar strapped to me for more than an hour or so.

 

IMHO though, I'd say either get used to the guitar, get a better strap, practice more, or get another gig.

 

Sorry, just took another look at the tread topic -- gotta spend more time on that.

 

It's easier to sing "cleaner" with and acoustic and "dirtier" with an electric. "dirty" singing wears more on the throat. Try and match the singing to the song and not the guitar. I know it sounds a little simplistic, but it's easier said than done. If you work at it though, it'; come.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmm... I don't sing while playing acoustic, so I can't speak on that issue.

 

However, I do sing (or whatever passes for that in my case) while playing electric.

I find I have no problems at all. I sing from my diaphragm, and I project. I am loud as hell.

 

The only time I get hoarse is when I'm sick. Then I have problems... but I don't get sick often.

\m/

Erik

"To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists of breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting."

--Sun Tzu

Link to comment
Share on other sites

CDM: that's because you're not doing landscaping any more, hah!!!

 

When you have to yell or push to be heard, that will cause your voice to get tired or hoarse. Playing a soft acoustic number where you can hear yourself clearly means you relax and sing with out strain. If when you play electric, the sound is louder and you're not hearing the monitors well, or even if you are, you need to sing louder to be heard. Maybe you should consider in ear monitors. They really help you to hear yourself sing.

 

I am really enjoying singing through the Bose PAS system. It is so clean and clear, I can hear myself really well, even in a group setting and it helps to keep my vocal endurance up.

I'm trying to think but nuthin' happens....
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Listen Bro having a heavy guitar is like putting on weight IN YOUR NECK - NOT GOOD. use an extra wide strap and do neck and back exercises. Also I don't know how low you like your gutiar slung but the lower the better because your arms are forces to stretch instead of bunching up and binding muscles in your shoulders. And Always practice (even if your not playing the gutiar at the time) with the guitar around your neck.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nah, I am just generally pretty healthy...

 

It's true, though... I have a lot of friends who end up pushing too hard when they sing because they can't hear well or there isn't enough power in the PA to cope with the volume of the band. Then they get hoarse.

 

That's when volume balance comes into play...

\m/

Erik

"To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence; supreme excellence consists of breaking the enemy's resistance without fighting."

--Sun Tzu

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...