Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Major Fret Buzz! Any Ideas?


revorhythm

Recommended Posts

So my girlfriend knows basically nothing about guitars, and has even less luck picking them out. Her new acoustic, an Ibanez jumbo body style, has some major fret buzz problems. Now this could be for many reasons, first of which was the neck. I checked it and it loox straight. So that leads me to the frets, or the nut.

Furthermore, her high e string does not sound at the 12th fret, its completley muted, same problem on the 13th fret for the b string. Also on the high e, the 13th and 14th fret are at the same pitch, there is no difference in sound.

Any idea's? She does need new strings, but i find it hard to believe all this is caused by bad strings. Does anyone think they have an idea of a simple test, or fix i might try on it. I'm also plannin on taking it to the shop she bought it at, theyre a friendly local shop and would prolly take a look at it for me too. Thanx!

hot girls, fast cars, and even louder guitars
Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 8
  • Created
  • Last Reply
truss rod. the neck probably has some back bow. a neck needs a bit of relief to handle the arc of the vibrating strings. you may also have a few frets that are either lifted or high. but take it to the tech for evaluation. an exagerated view of a properly adjusted neck should look like a bow. where the string is the string of the bow and the neck is the curved bow. without seeing the guitar i would suggest a tech look at it. it could be a number of things.
Link to comment
Share on other sites

From the side does the first string look higher or lower above the action at the twelfth fret than at the first fret? How about between the first, twelfth and twentieth frets?

 

Also you should check the neck with a straight edge. As good as the old Mark I eyeball is nothing beats a straight edge for checking neck relief.

 

If you get the same tone on the thirteenth and fourteenth frets then the fourteenth fret is what you're hearing even when you fret the thirteenth. That really sounds like too much relief and the action being a little too low.

 

You could try tightening the truss rod nut a bit (try it a quarter turn at a time -- and don't forget to loosen the strings a little). You may also need to raise the action a little on the treble side.

 

My guess is that when you fret at the twelfth fret the string is touching the rest of the frets up to the body end of the neck. Ergo, no sound. If that's the case, the neck is bowed slightly (too much relief) and has a "dip" in it. So tightening the nut will straighten the neck out. You'll probably have to raise the action a little to compensate for this.

 

Make sure you use a straight edge on the neck before you tighten the truss rod nut. You don't want to put any back-bow in it.

 

If you tighten the truss rod, that also may throw your intonation off a bit. I'm not sure you can do anything about that on an acoustic.

Born on the Bayou

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah, the neck loox alright, but my eyes have been known to decieve me. Im really lening towards that idea, mainly because this really occured after her stupid ass rommate dropped the guitar off her bed, which is about 5 feet off the ground. When i heard this happened, I went into a rage for her.
hot girls, fast cars, and even louder guitars
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try this method on checking the neck out (truss rod setting). You will need a capo and a .010 inch (i.e. ten thousandth of an inch) feeler gauge:

 

1. Place a capo over the first fret to take the nut out of play.

 

2. Fret the 6th String (i.e. Low E string) at the highest fret and with a .010 inch feeler gauge, check the gap between the bottom of 6th string and the top of 8th Fret. It the gap is too small (i.e. feeler gauge has a tight fit, the neck is too flat or convex. To correct this, you need to loosen the truss rod nut (turn it counterclockwise) to put a little more bow/relief into the neck. Do this 1/8 turn at a time, retune and recheck. Having the neck too flat (i.e. not enough relief) can cause fret buzzing.

 

If the gap is too large, the neck has too much bow and you have to tighten the truss rod neck and proceed as above.

 

Note: If the truss rod does not want to turn easily, don't force it. Try loosening the guitar strings to relieve tension on the rod and then adjust the truss rod. Make sure you then retune the guitar and check the neck bend as above.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...