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Bob Dylan : No direction home


pollock

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Recorded Part One - forgot about Part 2 (Arsenal & Man.U playing live) - Damn!

 

If anyone's got Part 2, I have Part 1.........

 

I found it *very* interesting from a socio-historical point of view, as I never really 'got' Dylan, but the relationship to the politics etc is what I find fascinating. I was a teenager in the 60's and was involving myself with other things(!).

 

Geoff

"When the power of love overcomes the love of power the World will know Peace": Jimi Hendrix

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After seeing this documentary I have much more of an appreciation for him & his music.

 

It was hilarious the way he responded to reporters when they asked him psycho-social babble questions about his music and what he represented in culture in the mid-sixties.

 

Best (paraphrased)quote from one of the press conferences:

 

"Q: Do you think of yourself more as a songwriter or poet?

 

A: Actually I think of myself more as a song and dance man." :D

Mudcat's music on Soundclick

 

"Work hard. Rock hard. Eat hard. Sleep hard. Grow big. Wear glasses if you need 'em."-The Webb Wilder Credo-

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Originally posted by Mudcat:

 

Best (paraphrased)quote from one of the press conferences:

 

A: Actually I think of myself more as a song and dance man." :D

He's really come down in the world then... ;)

"erotic hitchhiker wearing japanese

blanket. gets my attention by asking didn't

he see me at this hootenanny down in

puerto vallarta, mexico/i say no you must

be mistaken. i happen to be one of the

Supremes..."

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Originally posted by Mudcat:

It was hilarious the way he responded to reporters when they asked him psycho-social babble questions about his music and what he represented in culture in the mid-sixties.

That was great. Funny how they asked him how many songwriters write about social issues, war, ect.

 

Dylan: "a hundred and thirty-six"

Reporter: "about one hundred and thirty-six or exactly one hundred and thirty-six"

 

Dylan: "Its either a hundred and thirty-six or a hundred and forty-two."

 

Just finished watching part 2, - genius

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My favorite thing from the first night was said by one of the Band after a show in England, "It's tough to tune up when their booing."

 

I was pretty impressed with the film. I missed parts of both nights and didn't catch the very begining.

 

The reporters were asking the stupidest questions, and it appears that as the European tour with the electric band went on he was just exhausted.

 

I grew to like or understand his singing more from all the footage of film from his folk days. I took it like he was confronting you with the words and the songs, not just singing them. It was a harsh sounding voice for a song that was demanding to be heard.

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My Unitarian Jihad Name: Brother Broadsword of Enlightened Compassion.

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IN a biography I read years ago, the thing about him that impresed Woody Guthrie when he met him was his voice. Guthrie said it was his voice that would make him.

 

Me, I always thought he was a great songwriter that played fairly decent guitar and sang like a dog with a bad case of intestinal parasites.

 

Go figure...

Always remember that you�re unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

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Originally posted by picker:

IN a biography I read years ago, the thing about him that impresed Woody Guthrie when he met him was his voice. Guthrie said it was his voice that would make him.

Mind you, Woody wasn't exactly Pavarotti either.

 

Speaking of biographies, have you ever read Woody's "Bound For Glory"?

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Originally posted by crazyguitarist11:

Originally posted by Mudcat:

It was hilarious the way he responded to reporters when they asked him psycho-social babble questions about his music and what he represented in culture in the mid-sixties.

That was great. Funny how they asked him how many songwriters write about social issues, war, ect.

 

Dylan: "a hundred and thirty-six"

Reporter: "about one hundred and thirty-six or exactly one hundred and thirty-six"

 

Dylan: "Its either a hundred and thirty-six or a hundred and forty-two."

 

Just finished watching part 2, - genius

LOL! The great thing about this exchange is I don't think the reporter figured out that Dylan was jerking his chain. :freak:

 

Loved it when Dylan politely got in the face of the reporter who admitted he had never listened to any of his music. That must have been a very strange scene for Dylan.

 

As far as his singing goes, I've decide that I actually like it on the early recordings. Something weird started going on with his voice after the motorcycle accident. Never cared for his voice much after that.

Mudcat's music on Soundclick

 

"Work hard. Rock hard. Eat hard. Sleep hard. Grow big. Wear glasses if you need 'em."-The Webb Wilder Credo-

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Originally posted by webe123:

I just never thought he could sing! He can write great, but I hate his voice.

It's different, which is good, but I agree after listening to him for a long time it can get a little...annoying. But his voice is soooo unique, which relates to his also amazingly unique songwriting.
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