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A good book for Jazz chord progressions


Hardtail

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Hey all,

 

I was considering asking this on the "What is Jazz" thread but felt in the end that I might hijack it and inadvertently change its flow.

 

Anyway, I'm looking for a decent book on some mildly challenging chord progressions to get the hands back in shape.

 

I don't need an encyclopedic tome of every chord in existence. I'm merely looking for some kind of primer (something to play along with; not to study).

 

In addition, I'm looking for progressions that are laid out fairly syncopated... something a little more challenging than strumming on the downbeat.

 

I hope I'm making sense.

 

Thanks!

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Well The best I know of is Ted Greens "Modern chord progressions" But I think you should really take the plunge and get into the theory of how to build you own chords and progressions.

Again Ted Greenes "Single note soling" volumes one and two will teach you all about chord tones and how to play over them. They present the material in an easy to understand way. I don't think that the musical examples sound all that appealing but the knowledge is invaluable.

 

If you just want some progressions though Mickey Baker has a book that has alot of basic shord progressions called complete course in Jazz Guitar.

 

If you are looking for something to just warm up and get your hands in shape I don't know why you are looking for something challenging in chords and sycopation. It sounds like you aren't sure if you want to learn alot or if you just want to learn something fast. Iv'e been playing for 30 years and still haven't learned to play jazz since it takes a big commitment in learning the theory and then bieng able to apply that theory in improvisation. You have to have the knowledge and the ear to recognize what is going on. Its not something that is picked up over a weekend.

 

I am not really trying to come down on you. You can have some great fun playing a few songs and progressions that sound jazzy. But I stated my opinion in the "What is Jazz" post as bieng based on improvisation and maybe with a swing feel. It never hurts to learn a few progressions though. Those extended chords sure do sound cool when used in the right spots. So based on your question I would think the Mickey Baker book would be a good start. Of course there are probably many songs books with jazz standards that have great guitar chords both in tab and in standard notation. The syncopation part isn't usually written though, thats something you have to feel and hear.

 

I hope I didn't offend you with my answer as alot of jazz guys can be rather snobby, see the MJNGG post about that hehe. But part of it is that some of those guys really are knowledgable about the theory end of its and know what kind of dedication it takes to play that music. Where I have a problem is that they tend to look down on everything that isn't whatever particular style of jazz they are into.

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Gruppi,

 

Thanks! Mickey Baker's book is what I want for this specific purpose. I went though some of his stuff a long time ago and was trying to think of his name all night.

 

I totally agree on the study of theory. In fact, I had studied it quite extensively in my days though it's been over a decade and I'll have to get some of that back.

 

I wasn't looking to learn "jazz fast" but just something to get started to get the hands back in shape. Mickey Baker's chord progressions should help. Along the way, I also want to expose the ear to something more than just major bar chords.

 

Thanks again.

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Can you spell M--I--C--K--E--Y----B--A--K--E--R. Yes, I got Mikey Baker's Vol I and Vol II 30 years ago. When I went through a minor in music in college I was light years ahead of the kids who could read music, but couldn't "hear" music. The "drills" in chord changes in standard diatonic song structure underpin almost anything you'll ever want to do.
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Originally posted by KPB:

Hey all,

 

I was considering asking this on the "What is Jazz" thread but felt in the end that I might hijack it and inadvertently change its flow.

 

Anyway, I'm looking for a decent book on some mildly challenging chord progressions to get the hands back in shape.

 

I don't need an encyclopedic tome of every chord in existence. I'm merely looking for some kind of primer (something to play along with; not to study).

 

In addition, I'm looking for progressions that are laid out fairly syncopated... something a little more challenging than strumming on the downbeat.

 

I hope I'm making sense.

 

Thanks!

Can you play "Thank You Boys" from Nothing's Shocking? Not sure if it would suit your needs (maybe not challenging enough?) but it might be something to get you going. I usually work on that one a bit every time I play.

quote:Originally posted by mdrs:

 

It's pure B.S., and obvioulsy inaccurate. I suspect it is posted for effect, not for accuracy.

 

John Petrucci > Johnny Winter

The Edge > Ted Nugent

Guitar One Mag > Guitarplayer

Slash > Carlton

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