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Somtimes we obsess too much, sometimes pedals get in the way


BluesWithoutBlame

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It occurred to me...and I am really susceptible to this kind of thing, sometimes we really obsess way too much on tone, gadgets, etc.

 

I realized, I read this forum, a few others, read books about tube amplifiers (electronics), and tweak, tweak, tweak...

 

It occurs to me this can get to the point where we miss the point.

 

Has to do with pedals too...I have been using/buying lots of pedals, it's FUN!! It's exciting to get a new pedal, some are keepers, some we get bored with after a while, look for the next one.

 

I don't know about you guys, but often I "start from scratch" and start with just guitar->amp, working the tone and vol to get what I want. Gradually adding some pedals.

 

Often I change pedal order, or pedal lineups...which pedals to take with, how to set them, WHEN to use them.

 

This is all lots of fun, but I am thinking sometimes it just gets in the way...what I mean is, this stuff is all well and good when it doesn't cut into my REAL home practice time...time when I am working on my playing. And always need small adjustments, because when playing with the band, it it GOOD to pay attention to your tone, and always be somewhat aware of how your tone and sound is in the context of the band...and volumes.

 

But, when I am playing, doing a solo especially, I ought to be getting the feel...that tone stuff and all ought to be ready, and now it is just time to play what you feel, but in the song context.

 

 

There are SO many things going on when we play. I think it would be more obsessing but maybe smart to think about WHAT we think about when playing.

 

Like, say you have a good tone going one night. You are comping, playing small fills, etc. and now comes your solo.

 

-First thing is the timing and any phrase that is already decided. This ought to be automatic and usually is.

- as soon as you hit a note, you want to be listening to the relative volume with the band. Are you loud enough? Too loud?

- Going into the solo...this is where I can get off the track. Sometimes I am thinking "is my TONE okay? is it what I wanted (say "bubbly, crystal clean" as en example)...this is a mistake I think, because the ways I can change tone with my setup (the guitars' tone controls almost never are the freqs I am looking to change) is by using or turning off one of my pedals. Already I'm thinking too much and I can't really even solve any problem. I think I ought to be thinking more, "okay...this is the tone I've got right now, how can I use it best? what riffs, style, etc.".

- All this time you are playing, but if you are thinking too much about tone, you aren't concentrating on building up a solo, or "talking" with your guitar.

- At the same time, there may be things you have to remember, like tricky phrases with the song, or outro's...

 

I'm not really writing this all that well, I could have spent more time on it, but I mean that I can recall as a young man with only a volume pedal, and a fuzz tone, I used to never worry about this so much. I used to set my amp, and play...and after each song I might tweak the amps tone controls a little (usually adding treble if I remember right) and you know what...I have recordings from then (70's ) and I had pretty damn good tone. I played an ES-335 (still have it) through an Ampeg VT-22 with 4 x 10s.

 

I guess I am just saying...yeah SRV had a helluva tone, but it was not just ONE tone. If you listen to his stuff he has quite a few very different tones. Even on the same live album, his tone is way different when using a vibe than straight, etc. I think this "holy grail" can really get in the way, at least for me.

 

I spend MANY hours a week practicing. Often through a GT-1 with those TERRIBLE effects patches, so I can play along with Cds' for practice. And THAT tone is terrible, but I get it "ballpark" and feggedaboutit...I don't care, I end up playing with concentration, and my "tone" sounds fine.

 

I think I've become a tone snob, and I think the nature of that is, you NEVER get there. You spend way too much (when I say "you" I mean "me") time trying like hell to acheive something that is elusive and will never be reached.

 

It's like some people...just want "more".

No matter the tone, people that get hung up about this just want "more".

 

Even the SRV copiers, in reality I think they want "SRV's sound" BUT...MORE SO!

 

This is just a rant, but I think I am on to something here.

====================================================

Check out my original music at

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/jacker

 

"In theory there is no difference between theory and practice,

but not in practice."

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Originally posted by BluesWithoutBlame:

It occurred to me...and I am really susceptible to this kind of thing, sometimes we really obsess way too much on tone, gadgets, etc.

Well, yes. And it's understandable because humans have a persistant longing for THE gadget that will solve all our problems. When we didn't have gadgets, we'd try to get there by magic.

 

Personally, even though I know that I'm kidding myself, I find it comforting to believe there's a pedal out there that will give me the most amazing sound ever. It's easier to throw a few bucks at the problem than to spend years on end practising my chops :D

 

And I enjoy buying pedals too, don't get me wrong. One thing that I dislike about acoustic guitar is that there's a limit to all the gadgets one can buy. I had the same disappointing experience when I took up sax. :)

 

But there you go, there's a whole world of people that don't worry about tweaking and just get busy playing their acoustic instruments. And then there's all the guys that, in interviews, say "dunno about pedals. I'm a 'straight into the amp' guy".

 

I think they may have the right idea.

 

Is this sort of what you're talking about?

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Originally posted by Chipotle:

Yeah, pedals suck.

Well that may be the case for you, but I love effects. I have a line 6 vetta II that has all the effects I need in one amp. I can also choose a crystal clean sound with no or little effects and use them also, so it is all in what your taste is.

 

I can also decide to do different kinds of styles of music from country to hard rock and I can do them with no problem. Switching the effects on the vetta for me, is very easy, you just have to find the sounds you like.

 

I don't use pedals, because it only added noise when I went through the PA system. Though years ago, before multi-effect units came out, I did use pedals.

 

Basically some like an amp with a guitar and cord and that is OK, but I think it is ALSO OK if you like effects. Just different strokes for different folks.

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Blues,

 

I wrote this for another thread, but I think it applies here too. Let me know if this makes sense.

 

I think that the term "tone", as it applies to guitar, is often confused with "sound".

All of the gutar greats are changing amps, pedals, and strings, just as much as the rest of us, yet they always have a recognizable "tone". This leads to the conclusion that newer and/or better gear is not the key to "tone". The way you attack the strings, speed of your bends, the width of your vibrato, your sense of phrasing, the sublte things are what sets each of us apart.

Now this is where gear comes in. You should be able to get your "tone" on any guitar or amp, even modeled amps. If you can't, you haven't developed the subtleties of the instrument. That said, a Marshall is always going to "sound" different than a Vox. To my ears modeling amps just don't "sound" good. Like I posted earlier, SRV's "sound" on Texas Flood is radially different than on In Step, but there is no mistaking his "tone".

I hope this makes sense...

www.myspace.com/christondre
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Originally posted by GtrWiz:

Blues,

 

I wrote this for another thread, but I think it applies here too. Let me know if this makes sense.

 

I think that the term "tone", as it applies to guitar, is often confused with "sound".

All of the gutar greats are changing amps, pedals, and strings, just as much as the rest of us, yet they always have a recognizable "tone". This leads to the conclusion that newer and/or better gear is not the key to "tone". The way you attack the strings, speed of your bends, the width of your vibrato, your sense of phrasing, the sublte things are what sets each of us apart.

Now this is where gear comes in. You should be able to get your "tone" on any guitar or amp, even modeled amps. If you can't, you haven't developed the subtleties of the instrument. That said, a Marshall is always going to "sound" different than a Vox. To my ears modeling amps just don't "sound" good. Like I posted earlier, SRV's "sound" on Texas Flood is radially different than on In Step, but there is no mistaking his "tone".

I hope this makes sense...

Yeah, that makes a LOT of sense. Not only that, it is really insightful.

 

Often we, (people in general too) are so imprecise about word usage. I think you are on to something.

 

Hell, just look at what everyone calls a "tremolo bar" :-) it isn't tremolo at all, it is vibrato!

 

But back to your point, it is a really good one, because to someone at all technical "tone" is like what color is to an artist...it is frequencies, the absence of frequencies and the presence of them...

 

Tone can be almost tangible. And if you use almost no techinique say...just using a plectrum on an open-e string, using no hard attack, just wishy washy light downstroke and THEN plugged into another amp, or changed the settings...you are changing the tone.

 

Likewise, with a hard pick attack, or a sweet left hand vibrato you are changing tone yea...but also you, as you say, are getting a "sound".

 

 

More I think about it, the more I like it. Threads ought to be like "How do I get the SRV SOUND?"...

 

And then it is a whole new ball game. "Tone" is also abstract in a way, because sound is not there without (however bad or good it is) technique, and that is intertwined with choice of notes, and rythm. It's all pretty much intertwined.

 

 

Think about SRV "tone" playing something completely not appropriate, like Pink Floyd, or Dick Dale... :-) when people talk about that sound they also are doign it in context of the style as well.

 

Thnaks, that was an interesting point.

====================================================

Check out my original music at

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/jacker

 

"In theory there is no difference between theory and practice,

but not in practice."

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Yep.. good subject and I have thought about it much more since I have been involved in this forum..Well I look at it this way.. since I am always in a cover band I see my job as the guitarplayer to copy as best I can what people are used to hearing on other peoples recordings. So I buy and set up my peddle board and amp to be able to copy or get as close as I can within reason. Alot of times since we do classic rock and blues..my Marshall rig is pretty much right on for the classic sound and the wah wah sound like 60's 70's kind of rock vibe. I am looking forward to gettng the 62 Pro Amp finished so I can use it on stage with the Marshall rig and maybe have some more tone variation from the amp ONLY. Because we use a keyboard player in our group I dont have to use some effects too much because the majority of effects is added into the mix by his keyboards..I find that with a good keyboard player you dont use the chorus much. So my setup is always changing depending on the song we are trying to copy - but the basic tone is clean to driven Marshall. Bottom line is probably 80% of everything we play is taken care of with the Classic Marshall tone.
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I guess there is a point where you can spend too much time playing with the gadgets and not enough just playing guitar. But I also think it is important to put the time into learning each pedal. Just having the device is not enough. If you don't put in the time learning how to make it sound good it can be detrimental to your sound.

 

Finding where in the chain to put it?, how noisy it is?, does it take top end off the signal? It's definitely important to put in the time. Like anything else the more time you spend with it the better you will know how to use it.

 

Marc

Searching for a new sig
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I like pedals. Pedals give you more options. One of those options is to not use them. More guitars & amps give you still more options. If you're happy with what you've got, great! If you want to mess around with pedals, great!

The thing is there are so many great tones/sounds out there. And inside of each of us. Use the tools that you find work best for you to reach as many or as few of those tones as you'd like.

Just keep on rockin'* either way.

 

 

*or bluesin', or jazzin', or...

"Am I enough of a freak to be worth paying to see?"- Separated Out (Marillion)

NEW band Old band

 

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Originally posted by BluesWithoutBlame:

Hell, just look at what everyone calls a "tremolo bar" :-) it isn't tremolo at all, it is vibrato![/QB]

Huh, I've always called it a "whammy bar" - and haven't wanted to use one since "Hanky Panky" by Tommy James and the Shondells...

 

I've come full circle on this issue. I used to think it was dishonest or lazy to use a pedal, used to be one of those "straight into the amp" Luddites. That's because I love acoustic guitar so much. Now I see the electric as a different instrument than an acoustic, one that has the capability to make different sounds. Now I use them, and enjoy them.

 

I think it all started a few years ago when I bought my first envelope filter. I didn't leave the house for days - it's a sickness...

 

 

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I hate when people just have all of these pedals and start playing and thyey say " cool sound eh" but the thing is that there not that good at guitar because there so obsessed with pedals n gadgets. I think you should REALLY learn how to play the instrument before you advance on to your sound :thu:
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Originally posted by AWD 8T2:

I hate when people just have all of these pedals and start playing and thyey say " cool sound eh" but the thing is that there not that good at guitar because there so obsessed with pedals n gadgets. I think you should REALLY learn how to play the instrument before you advance on to your sound :thu:

Dude, if turning your hat around backwards makes you win at cards, only an idiot leaves on pointed forward. If using a pedal or twenty give you a sound that inspires your playing, only an idiot doesn't use them.

When are people gonna get it through their heads that there are no rules about playing guitar, and that what anyone happens think of this or that is really a matter of taste, or the lack of it?

Always remember that you�re unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

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I feel that the true "tone" of a great guitarist like SRV is in his hands. Most people are a bit obsessed with tone and they are quick to judge things like pedals or modeling amps and how they somehow "lessen" your tone. If SRV where here and played through a Line6 Vetta I doubt many people would complain about his tone. Hell he could make any solid state amp sound good because he carried so much of his "tone" in his hands. I think when someone is first learnig how to play effects can get in the way of developing good "tone". That's why I love acoustic so much. Of course with that said if someone has developed good tone in their hands than effects can most deffinitly enhance songs. As a song writer I love the textures effects can add to a song. I think Radiohead uses effects...well effectively. And of course Pink Floyd...Thank God for Pink Floyd!
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I think a lot of people miss the point that when/if you become recognized for `your sound`, you don`t have to worry about covering a lot of other bases (unless you want to). All you have to deal with is getting the same ballpark sound out of whatever you`re playing through. I don`t think it`s too good to get locked too much into a `just so` sound unless you know you`re always going to play through the same gear-again, easy once you get some notice and take your `sig rig` everywhere. Sometimes I play with a sound I thought was great, but plug in to a different amp, or try to record it and it sounds terrible.

Same old surprises, brand new cliches-

 

Skipsounds on Soundclick:

www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandid=602491

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I like pedals just cuz it is cool to have a part stand out in a song. VH, Zepp, The Beatles, ..

 

The tone is in your hands first and I think the pedals just add to that.

 

Personally one of my goals which has actually been gettin in the way at practice--for some reason I am trying to sound like a spaceship most of the time.

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Blues, I think you worry too much. Shut up and play yer guitar. ;)

 

In my experience, a player will sound like him or herself regardless of what type of signal processing is going on. That being said, there are times when I'm listening to Space Hog and their guitarist will get this tone and my mind just screams, "Brian May!". Some effects impart a certain vibe to what you play, and it's best to know what context they should be used in. The treble booster is almost useless for anything but Brian May's tone from the days of Queen, but those songs just won't sound right without that tone.

BlueStrat

a.k.a. "El Guapo" ;)

 

...Better fuzz through science...

 

http://geocities.com/teleman28056/index.html

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I don`t know-I think `tone` is getting mixed up with `style` here-Lee Flier`s guitar, I don`t care how magical your hands are, you`re not going to get a tone like that without an equally pedigreed guitar.

Myself, I have sort of a signature `style`, but I don`t have a tone or a sound I`ve stuck with so far-still experimenting.

Same old surprises, brand new cliches-

 

Skipsounds on Soundclick:

www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandid=602491

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I'm also a bit guilty of getting too many pedals for my own good... considering that I have only been playing electric for around 8 months. (6 years acoustic before that)

I already have a

Sansamp GT2

SD-1

Crybaby 535Q

(bought and sold a Vox AD30VT)

(in the process of selling my current amp)

 

I never had this much gear lust when I was playing acoustic... :P

 

Pier.

* Godin Freeway Classic * Seagull M6 * Timothy S10J
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I think there's plenty of us lo-tech guitar guys out there - you just don't find them on internet guitar forums or on the covers of guitar mags. What I mean by lo-tech is someone whose guitar obsession focuses mainly on technique and most likely playing acoustic rather than electric.The meek shall inherit the earth. (So will bicycle riders.)
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Great topic.

 

This brings to mind another question. Why do we use effects at all? Is it to make what we play more interesting because without the effects it would be boring? If so, maybe the unplugged or effects free guys have it right. If not, why do we use them?

Born on the Bayou

 

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Originally posted by LPCustom77:

Great topic.

 

This brings to mind another question. Why do we use effects at all? Is it to make what we play more interesting because without the effects it would be boring? If so, maybe the unplugged or effects free guys have it right. If not, why do we use them?

Oh boy, here we go...

look, I`ve had a drink or two but I don`t think this is a right or wrong question. But if you want to play this game to its conclusion-why play music? I mean, assume I`m serious, what do you have to say with an instrument that hasn`t been said? what do you have to say that you couldn`t just say verbally? do you need a guitar to make it seem interesting?

The people who make music instruments and gear

want to make money no doubt, but I do believe that at least some of them feel that they are trying to work together with creative artists to really produce new ways to express creative visions, to make artistic statements that couldn`t be made otherwise. If it doesn`t resonate with you, oh well-but to say it wouldn`t have any content without the enhancements is pretty damn facile. There are those who abuse the effects, surprise surprise. Anything is subject to abuse.

Same old surprises, brand new cliches-

 

Skipsounds on Soundclick:

www.soundclick.com/bands/pagemusic.cfm?bandid=602491

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I was obssessing too much once, and pedals got in the way. Honest. I reckon, mghmn-hghmn.

 

I was obssessing too much over this girl over by the bar, and my pedals got in the way; tripped over an Ernie Ball volume-pedal, and nearly fell off the stage.

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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But like I mentioned...

 

1) Like drinking...if you NEED a pedal, or a thousand...maybe it's a problem. Not for everyone, but for the ones that get too hung up on them...too obsessed.

 

2) Again, at some point it gets ridiculous...I mean people that are a little "too" proud that "I NEVER use pedals...straight into the amp"..it's just as much a trap as buying every pedal you see in hopes it will make you SRV, or David Gilmour, or Hendrix.

Taken to extremes it would be like being proud of never using any pickup but the bridge, never playing anywhere on the string except the "normal" position, having an amp with only volume (if that)...that's extremes.

Pedals can be useful, I just pointed out it is a personal thing. I find I am having some kind of second childhood, like a guy that went through the depression and buys TONS of canned food to make sure...I never could afford the pedals I craved, and now have enough money that I can buy some. Went through a phase buying Boss, and such, but found later I liked other pedals better.

 

3) As far as needing pedals, or "is it to cover up deficiencies"...no, I don't think it is. Think of pedal-effects use through the Rock era.

What would "Satisfaction" have been without, how about Pink Floyd? They use it as spice...and tastefully too. There's another analogy, what cook would say "it ought to be JUST the basic foods, NO spices"? The best cooks, use spices sparingly but wisely. They use spices that accentuate the taste of the food already present.

Other times, think like some of the Tom Waits guitarists work...getting that excellent "fake retro" nasty, nasty guitar that is perfect for the music.

Hendrix...he used them musically and to my taste, never overdid it...it was never an effect for the sake of using an effect. As far as I know, up til him they had some wahs, but they used it like tremolos almost, he saw what it could be used for and Clapton tried it then.

The main thing with effects is, unless THAT is the effect you want, it is an art to make it not let your guitar sound be "distant". That is the true danger with effects...that they can make a guitar lose the very sound it is best at and sound far away and insignificant. Too much reverb, phase shifting, etc. takes it out...

 

But then think SRV using a vibe. Brings it UP and makes it even more "vibrant" and up front!

 

 

Just some thoughts. There IS no right or wrong with it.

====================================================

Check out my original music at

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/jacker

 

"In theory there is no difference between theory and practice,

but not in practice."

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But like I mentioned...

 

1) Like drinking...if you NEED a pedal, or a thousand...maybe it's a problem. Not for everyone, but for the ones that get too hung up on them...too obsessed.

 

2) Again, at some point it gets ridiculous...I mean people that are a little "too" proud that "I NEVER use pedals...straight into the amp"..it's just as much a trap as buying every pedal you see in hopes it will make you SRV, or David Gilmour, or Hendrix.

Taken to extremes it would be like being proud of never using any pickup but the bridge, never playing anywhere on the string except the "normal" position, having an amp with only volume (if that)...that's extremes.

Pedals can be useful, I just pointed out it is a personal thing. I find I am having some kind of second childhood, like a guy that went through the depression and buys TONS of canned food to make sure...I never could afford the pedals I craved, and now have enough money that I can buy some. Went through a phase buying Boss, and such, but found later I liked other pedals better.

 

3) As far as needing pedals, or "is it to cover up deficiencies"...no, I don't think it is. Think of pedal-effects use through the Rock era.

What would "Satisfaction" have been without, how about Pink Floyd? They use it as spice...and tastefully too. There's another analogy, what cook would say "it ought to be JUST the basic foods, NO spices"? The best cooks, use spices sparingly but wisely. They use spices that accentuate the taste of the food already present.

Other times, think like some of the Tom Waits guitarists work...getting that excellent "fake retro" nasty, nasty guitar that is perfect for the music.

Hendrix...he used them musically and to my taste, never overdid it...it was never an effect for the sake of using an effect. As far as I know, up til him they had some wahs, but they used it like tremolos almost, he saw what it could be used for and Clapton tried it then.

The main thing with effects is, unless THAT is the effect you want, it is an art to make it not let your guitar sound be "distant". That is the true danger with effects...that they can make a guitar lose the very sound it is best at and sound far away and insignificant. Too much reverb, phase shifting, etc. takes it out...

 

But then think SRV using a vibe. Brings it UP and makes it even more "vibrant" and up front!

 

 

Just some thoughts. There IS no right or wrong with it.

====================================================

Check out my original music at

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/jacker

 

"In theory there is no difference between theory and practice,

but not in practice."

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As one devils advocate to another: Good on ya Buddy! The key word here is 'obsessions'. We're all creative people with a fetish for guitar; we get obsessed with different aspects of guitar at different times, whether it be gear, techniques or a passion for a particular player.Myself, I'm currently going through a back-to-the-basics phase, and my pedals have been gathering dust for 9 months - but that's in keeping with just about everything else in my life after being

pretty seriously injured earlier this year. As well as having to work at getting my speech and memory,and things like walking back to normal, I've re-assessed a lot of the things that have meaning in my life, including guitar playing.Reason number one for playing: it keeps me sane. It relaxes me and connects me with my spirit.......sort of a form of meditation. Anything else to do with guitar comes second.

Back to obsession. For several weeks mine has been Clarence White. The spirit of his playing has always been something of a Holy Grail for me, and many years ago I wanted to BE Clarence White. Way beyond my abilities at the time however.Whom I kidding - still is!

A recent GP article on Tony Rice, in which he pays tribute to Clarence, has triggered of this whole Clarence White thing again. Much to my dismay I've found that anything other than his Byrds albums are impossible to buy from record shops where I live, so I've got to import them.(I just realised the irony of the fact that the one shop in Sydney who know anything about Clarence, and will order records for me,is a mostly jazz shop called Birdland) This begs the question: Why are so many people unaware of a player who was undoubtedly a genius?

But I've gone way off track here - what were we discussing - obsession and devil's advocacy or something?

Ta ta.....I'm off to Birdland to order my Clarence White records :)

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Originally posted by Philemec:

As one devils advocate to another: Good on ya Buddy! The key word here is 'obsessions'. We're all creative people with a fetish for guitar; we get obsessed with different aspects of guitar at different times, whether it be gear, techniques or a passion for a particular player.Myself, I'm currently going through a back-to-the-basics phase, and my pedals have been gathering dust for 9 months - but that's in keeping with just about everything else in my life after being

pretty seriously injured earlier this year. As well as having to work at getting my speech and memory,and things like walking back to normal, I've re-assessed a lot of the things that have meaning in my life, including guitar playing.Reason number one for playing: it keeps me sane. It relaxes me and connects me with my spirit.......sort of a form of meditation. Anything else to do with guitar comes second.

Back to obsession. For several weeks mine has been Clarence White. The spirit of his playing has always been something of a Holy Grail for me, and many years ago I wanted to BE Clarence White. Way beyond my abilities at the time however.Whom I kidding - still is!

A recent GP article on Tony Rice, in which he pays tribute to Clarence, has triggered of this whole Clarence White thing again. Much to my dismay I've found that anything other than his Byrds albums are impossible to buy from record shops where I live, so I've got to import them.(I just realised the irony of the fact that the one shop in Sydney who know anything about Clarence, and will order records for me,is a mostly jazz shop called Birdland) This begs the question: Why are so many people unaware of a player who was undoubtedly a genius?

But I've gone way off track here - what were we discussing - obsession and devil's advocacy or something?

Ta ta.....I'm off to Birdland to order my Clarence White records :)

Wow...thanks for sharing that. Really.

 

I think we are on the same wavelength. You reflect what your life is in music. Getting "back to basics" is good too.

 

So is "adding a little spice", and anything in between. You sound like a real artist.

 

I have to admit, I never heard of Clarence White, but I can sure take a look around here, and if I find his music available I can contact you.

 

We get our inspiration from all different things. Maybe I started this thread because I had some intuition that I was heading down the wrong path for me, right now.

 

That I was neglecting my basic love for playing, for coming up with THAT phrase, riff, or melody that is ME.

 

That can maybe touch someone else.

 

That is what it is all about for me. I get touched by other musicians, to the point where I either (depending on the music) want to laugh, cry, or dance...among other things. I want to be the driving force, that was the first thing I ever learned about me playing music, that I wanted to achieve what others have acheived with me.

 

To open up a world of feelings, or a world of thoughts, or a world of fun...That is what it really ends up being.

 

And if you use effects to enhance it, or just a simple guitar, acoustic or electric, with wonderful tone or nasty tone...that's all this is.

 

Some want to be guitar heros, but that to me is like the worst reason to be a guitarist. Fine for others, for me it is the feelings...there are REAL feeling we communicate with our tricks, and non-tricks phrasing, music, melody...that is what touches people.

 

I felt empathy for you with recovering from an accident, and yet I felt real hope for you with your "obsession"...I think it just means you are celebrating being alive, and wanting MORE...and that is great!

 

I wish you all the luck in the world! (not TOO much because that can also be a curse) and I have a lot of hope for you...I'd like to hear you someday.

 

Effects or not.

====================================================

Check out my original music at

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/jacker

 

"In theory there is no difference between theory and practice,

but not in practice."

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