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I know the Peavey T-60 is a "tank", but do they weigh 14 POUNDS?


webe123

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I found out something interesting about the WEIGHT of a Peavey T-60!! (They were american made guitars made in the 1980s in Meridian Mississippi in the U.S.) Apparently, they weigh 14 POUNDS????

 

I knew they were heavy....but 14 POUNDS??? A les paul only weighs around 8 or 9! And even that gets a bit much for me. Here is the site that says it weighs 14 pounds:

 

http://studentweb.bellarmine.edu/ch...bsoundclif.html

 

(just scroll down until you see the Peavey T-60 with the description beside it.)

 

Here is what it says:

 

"This is Clif's 1980 Peavey T-60 guitar, which he bought off of e-bay for $182.50. This 14

pound behemoth features an all ash body, two-peice maple neck, sealed Peavey tuners and the thickest bridge I've ever seen in my life. The real center of attention are the unique blade-style "toaster" pickups, which feature coil tap options and an out-of-phase mode. This thing can do rock, country, blues, and other worthwhile music under the sun with the greatest of ease, making Gibson's look like giant wastes of money. We must remember a time long ago, when Peavey was a respected guitar manufacturer that rivaled Fender and Gibby, and this is when this guitar was borne (out of wedlock one would guess...)

 

*Did anyone spy the subtle marketing employed by the T-60?"

 

MAN!! I knew they were heavy, but 14 POUNDS???? Can anyone confirm this by weighing their old T-60 on a scale?

 

Does YOUR old Peavey T-60 weigh 14 pounds?? Mabye that is why I had back problems in the 80s. LOL!!

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I will admit to having owned a T-60 in a previous life. It was very heavy. The saddles were so cheap that strings would sometimes break within hours of being changed; so I changed the saddles. The neck was rather "springy" and the frets annoyingly low. Furthermore, if they had sprayed any more finish on the neck, you would not have been able to tell that it was made of wood. The electronics were somewhat innovative for the time in that a coil split was built into the tone controls (i.e. 7-10 single coil, 1-7 humbucker) if I recall correctly and there was a phase switch. I can not imagine any condition under which I would ever want to play or even touch one again.

 

But maybe that's unduly harsh, though I think not.

 

Cheers,

 

Alan Tomlinson

 

P.S. FWIW, I traded the T-60 and bought a Gibson L-6S which I sold to buy an ES-335 which I sold. Now I own a Parker Fly.

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What's funny though, is that the T-40 was actually a pretty good sounding bass. The necks were a bit rubbery, but they hadsome great sounds in them. Heavy as lead, and ugly as sin too, but they sounded pretty decent.

Always remember that you�re unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

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I'm the second owner (the original being my older brother) of a 1978 Peavey T-60. I sold the T-40 I'd bought used in the late 1980's last year. It had a terrible sounding E string. Didn't matter what strings I put on it. There was a huge dead spot where the E string should've been. :freak:

 

I'm rebuilding the T-60 now. It actually sounds pretty good, but needs a re-fret. There was no coil tap on the T-60, though. Just the phase switch (actually a polarity reverse, to be accurate) which reversed polarity of one pickup. It only changed the sound when both pickups were in use.

 

As for the weight.. well.. I'll have to weigh mine tonight. But here's the facts now. T-60's were made from several pieces of Rock Maple. That is, hard, dense (and, in turn, heavy) wood. Maple weighs more than Mahogany. Guess why Les Paul's are Mahogany with Maple Caps rather than solely Maple throughout. ;)

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

Soundclick

fntstcsnd

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14 lbs. is a little high, the T-60 is really about 9 lbs. My brother got one new in 1984 and of course a got a $100.00 pawn shop piece of crap. The funny thing is after buying Les Pauls and Fenders the Peavey stands up to this day!
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Funny thing about wood in general, and ash in particular- it doesn't have a particularly consistent specific-density or average weight. No two pieces are quite alike. Southern swamp ash tends to be very light, while the type of Northern ash used in baseball-bats tends to be much denser, harder, and heavier. Heavier than most mahogany used in guitar construction, too (fantastic' speaks the truth).

 

Most guitar makers use the lighter varieties of ash, as found in Fender Telecasters and some Stratocasters, for example. The early '80s Peavey T-15 that I once owned had a body that was probably made of that heavier, harder Northern ash, judging by the bold, baseball-bat like woodgrain of its multiple pieces; some Peaveys were made of heavier than usual hard-rock maple, as well (fantastic' speaks the truth, again). The owner's manual for my Peavey T-15 stated that the body was made of maple or ash.

 

Peavey also used a lot of massive cast-metal hardware on those guitars, too. Even their knobs were heavier than those often found on other guitars!

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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  • 1 year later...

Does anybody know the years of production of the Peavey T-Series? My Dad has a T-15, and I just found a T-15 exactly like his at a pawn shop for $189. (I'm gonna spend the next couple days debating whether to get it or not.) I did a little research, fully expecting it to be a late 80's model, but found years of varying T-series guitars ranging from 1977 to 1984. Does anybody know the exact production span of the t-series? And if not the same, can you tell me the span of the T-15 itself?

 

thanks!

John 14:6 Psalms 139:13-16

 

Gear:

 

07 MIM Fender Active Jazz 5

06 MIM Fender Active P/J Combo

01 MIM Fender Fretless J

07 Epi Dot Archtop (ES 335)

00 MIM Fender Strat

 

And a few others :)

 

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My T-15 was either an '82 or an '83. Can't tell you more than that, though.

 

One very cool and fun thing about the T-15 is the very short 23.5" scale-length; practically has to have a set of "elevens" to keep enough tension to avoid terminal fret-buzz, though!

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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