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Cheap gear can be OK gear


bluesswing

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I must have the cheapest equipment in an actively gigging blues band -- have received only good feedback from fellow musicians & audience. I am very happy with the equipment (one guitar not yet received though): Jay Turser JT-136 3.25"/15" jazz box ($200 new with gig bag web page ), back-up guitar: Oscar Schmidt OE30 semihollow ($150 new web page ). Just bought Stellar Mercury 004 full size 3.5"/16" jazz box($200 new with hardshell case, similar to this web page . Main amp Laney's 15W class A ($100 used web page ) with Traynor ext cab ($100 used web page )

 

Total $950 for three guitars & amp + cab, think about that!!!!

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Go for it! You don't need to spend thousands to get the sound you want...despite what the snobs will tell you. If it sounds good, plays well...then groovy!

 

I got into a disagreement with someone here a while ago over "pro level gear" (just what that is...I'm not sure)...if it means good sounding, good playing gear at any price, then fine. If it means overrated high dollar gear just for the sake of being high dollar, then forget it.

"Cisco Kid, was a friend of mine"
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Last February, while waiting in line for the GC Grand Opening, I spoke with a fellow guitar player about my '03 Fendard Standard (MIM) Strat, and he kind of acted as though it wasn't as much a "real Strat" as his more expensive American Strat. Of course I chose not to take any offense with his opinions, and indeed I wished him only the best when he and I both ended up being among the ten finalists for GC's $100,000 Guitar Giveaway (which no one won) that evening. In our society there seems to be a prevailing attitude that the more a person spends for any of the things that they own (including musical gear), the better things they consequently have, and the better people they end up being. All that of course is not true, but it is indeed something that many people seem to insist on thinking that way. Anyhow, it is indeed possible to achieve a great sound with an inexpensive setup. Personally, I run my Strat ($389--it has a sunburst body and a rosewood fretboard, just like a '63 Strat that I owned back in the late 70's and early 80's) through an Ibanez Toneblaster 25R amp (sale price of $129) and an Alesis GuitarFX multi-effects pedal ($69), and I have an Ibanez V70CE-NT acoustic-electric guitar ($232) which is run through an Ibanez IBZ10 acoustic guitar amp ($79)--and, to me at least, it all sounds great, and amazingly loud if I wanted it to. Oh yes, I also have a Casio CTK-491 keyboard that I got at the GC Grand Opening for only $50, and that sounds great too. If one is able to upgrade their equipment, then great, do so--I have hopes of someday doing so myself, going to a somewhat bigger amp (I plan to buy a Carvin SX50 amp when I win their weekly gift certificate giveaway) and eventually adding an Ibanez classical-electric guitar and a Ibanez 335-type semi-hollowbody to my setup. But if one does upgrade, let it be for the futherance of one's music and sound and not just to "keep up with the Jones'". When it comes down to it, it's not the gear that makes the musician sound good--it is the musician that makes the gear sound good. As someone (I don't recall who) said recently somewhere on this forum, it's not what you play through, it's what you play through it.

Robert J. ("Bob") Welch III

 

"If you were the only person who ever lived, God still would have sent Jesus His only Son to die on the cross for YOU, because that is how much HE LOVES YOU!"

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Over on the bass forum there seems to be at least a few that buy a new amp/cab/rig and a new designer bass every time they want to access a new tone - while I just tap a switxh or roll a knob. I always say buy well-made flexible gear and you can save a lot of time money and multiple-everthing maintenance.

 

But some people like a lot of stuff.

 

I don't. I just like a lot of tone - and tones.

 

Each to their own I guess.

.
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Amen Bob,

 

A cool thing I have experienced several times was when other guitar players come to me saying how good your guitar sounds and asking what is that great looking/sounding guitar you are playing? Only you know that it is a cheapo Chinese or Indonesian $200 or so thing...I could easily fool them by saying it is a custom made $2,000 boutique instrument...but I never lie...

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I take what I call my "B" rig to open mics and blues jams. It draws a lot of comments like this:

 

"Man, that amp sounds good. What kind is it? Roland! I didn't even know they MADE a tube amp"

 

Me: "Uh, well, they don't. That's just a Blues Cube 30. It's solid state."

 

"That's a sweet Les Paul! Must be a reissue? Don't see many gold-tops, especially with P-90s."

 

Me: "Uh, well, no, actually it's not a Les Paul, it's a Pacific Rim knock-off. See, the headstock says 'Agile.' "

 

Paid $400 for the whole setup. ;)

 

Now I'm not sayin' that the high-priced spread ain't worth the money, just that there is perfectly adequate gear available for less.

 

Heck, even my "A" rig only totals out at about $1200, and has gigged a lot over the last five years with no major problems.

band link: bluepearlband.com

music, lessons, gig schedules at dennyf.com

 

STURGEON'S LAW --98% of everything is bullshit.

 

My Unitarian Jihad Name is: The Jackhammer of Love and Mercy.

Get yours.

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Yeah DennyF,

 

$200 for the guitar and $200 for the amp should make a very adequate rig for any experienced player to sound really good. If one is a beginner and does not know the stuff yet he/she may spend double or even more for starting up their hobby and still sound worse.

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my rig is fairly cheap,

Godin LG sp90, solid mahogany with seymour duncan p90's for $ 550.00 cdn brand new

yamaha Dg 100 with dual celestion vintage 30's for 550.00 cdn used

yamaha pacifica 812w

alder with flame veneer top, seymour duncan vintage staggered x2 and 59 hum in bridge, sperzel tuners and wilkinson vs100 trem , aquired by trade

just the Godin and dg100 (1100 clams) i can cover alot of ground.

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i only get noise if i am real close to my computer monitor. most amps make way more noise than the seymour duncan sp90's in my LG. one reason may be because they are fairly deep in the body. the pickup routes are painted with shielding paint. my pacifica makes way more noise. and the sp90's are kinda hot but still sweet sounding. this is my main guitar and its dog ass simple to use, 3 way switch and master volume and tone. real quick tonal variety.
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G-zan

 

Thanks for your quick response. As far as I know the P90s in my Les Paul are actually Gibson's, not Seymor Duncan's -- sorry for the confusion. Do you know if there are some significant differences between the sound etc. of these two manufacturers?

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Tks G-Zan

 

Your comments make sense, SD PU's are more modern than those in my guitar so we can expect little hotter sound from them. I'll let you know for sure when I have that gtr in my hands again (it was more than three years ago when I played it last time).

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Originally posted by Philip O'Keefe:

I have only two words for those who say that a truely great player can't get great music out of ultra-cheap instruments:

 

David Lindley.

 

I rest my case. :)

... or any of the great black bluesmen :cool: ... before they made some bucks and bought better gear ;)
Gotta' geetar... got the amp. There must be SOMEthing else I... "need".
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Speaking as a total gear snob, I love my Mark III Boogie, nothing else sounds or works as well for me as it does. I love my Hamer Special FM, and my Gibson Faded Flying V, they are tone monsters and play exactly the way I want them to. I really loved my Parker Fly Classic and my Gibson Heritage 80 Les Paul, and miss them like the dickens. And I once played a '62 Strat that I couldn't hope to afford but made all the other Strats I have owned or played sound and feel like crap, it was that good.

All that being said, I have played and owned some "el Cheapo" guitars that I miss dearly too; a white MIM Strat that I had to sell just recently; an Ibanez 335 style guitar that I traded off years ago; a parts Tele with a skinny Squire neck (God only knows who made the other parts) and the ugliest two-color sunburst I ever saw, that weighed a ton and had the greatest midrangy sneer I ever heard from a Tele; a Hondo Lazer headless guitar that was so trebly it could decapitate a boiled egg at fifty paces; a Jay Turser JT-136(GREAT jazz/blues box); a Turser electrified dobro with a Carvin pickup the guy who sold it to me put in it; an Ibanez SG shaped doubleneck(Stairway to Heaven sounded great on that thing); an Ibanez Rocket Roll(wanted a V even way back then); and my first electric guitar, a Teisco Del Rey copy of a Vox Phantom VI. I miss them all,and I wouldn't hesitate to gig with any of them. What a wonderful load of cheap crap. I am proud to have owned all of it. Wish I still did!

Always remember that you�re unique. Just like everyone else.

 

 

 

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Originally posted by Dave da Dude:

Originally posted by Philip O'Keefe:

I have only two words for those who say that a truely great player can't get great music out of ultra-cheap instruments:

 

David Lindley.

 

I rest my case. :)

... or any of the great black bluesmen :cool: ... before they made some bucks and bought better gear ;)
That's true Dave - very true. :thu:
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