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Bbach1

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Since winters are long and cold here, and I have a nice heated workshop built on the back of my garage, I'm thinking I'm going to spend the winter building my own custom axe. My father in law has all the wood working tools you can dream about. He likes to make furniture in his spare time and starts with raw product (tree trunks for those of you who don't know where wood comes from) :D . I have decided on a neck-through-body design. I'm sure I'm going to destroy a lot of good wood, so I have a question. Do any of you know of a good place to get the neck and body w/top cut to my specs? That way, I can do the custom finish work and add my desired electronics and special fretboard inlays etc. I have tried a number of the guitar part sites and "kit" sites, but none of them seem to be able to help. Maybe a custom luthier will start the project for me and allow me to do my own custom finish work. My alternative is to f*** up a few pieces of wood trying to get the body and neck cut properly. Suggestions would be appreciated.

 

Robert

bbach

 

Beauty is in the eye of the beer holder.

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Get the book "Make Your Own Electric Guitar" by Melvyn Hiscock and you will be good to go for doing your own bodies/necks... and you will feel like it truly is 'your' guitar, because you will have done it all.

 

drfuzz

"I'm just here to regulate the funkiness"
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Warmoth would likely do some custom work for you, though their prices might be a bit steep due to the tooling and programming required (which, ironically, is what helps them keep prices down on their regularly offered items). They can also do custom routing and mods to a body design that they already make, which might be more reasonably cost-effective.

 

Talk to Boggs about Carvin, "PM" him, he had them do a custom neck for his home-made guitar and he's very happy with them! Ask Boggs, he knows who to ask for when you call Carvin to get the real deal straight-poop bird's-eye low-down on that caper.

 

Also, PM "Earlybird"- a.k.a. Dan Erlewine- here on this forum, or under his own actual name on the Les Paul Forum. He'd know who to refer you to. Or try the folks at Stewart-MacDonald, Dan works for them, but in general their people either could do something, or hook you up with someone else who could.

 

Best of luck!

Ask yourself- What Would Ren and Stimpy Do?

 

~ Caevan James-Michael Miller-O'Shite ~

_ ___ _ Leprechaun, Esquire _ ___ _

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Originally posted by george costanza:

The first thing I'd suggest is that you stay away from "raw" wood. You mentioned your father-in-law starts projects with tree trunks but un-kilned, un-seasoned wood is quite likely to warp.

Duh George. Wood does have to go through a drying process.

bbach

 

Beauty is in the eye of the beer holder.

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Originally posted by Caevan O'Shite:

Warmoth would likely do some custom work for you, though their prices might be a bit steep due to the tooling and programming required (which, ironically, is what helps them keep prices down on their regularly offered items). They can also do custom routing and mods to a body design that they already make, which might be more reasonably cost-effective.

 

Talk to Boggs about Carvin, "PM" him, he had them do a custom neck for his home-made guitar and he's very happy with them! Ask Boggs, he knows who to ask for when you call Carvin to get the real deal straight-poop bird's-eye low-down on that caper.

 

Also, PM "Earlybird"- a.k.a. Dan Erlewine- here on this forum, or under his own actual name on the Les Paul Forum. He'd know who to refer you to. Or try the folks at Stewart-MacDonald, Dan works for them, but in general their people either could do something, or hook you up with someone else who could.

 

Best of luck!

I already spoke with Warmoth, Stewart-Macdonald, and emailed Carvin. No luck there in getting help. The more I think about it though, the more I'm determined to do mine from scratch. Not necessarily starting with a tree, but a good high quality maple block. Dr Fuzz, I do appreciate your book suggestion. I always try to suck up as much information as I can when I'm getting into something. I purchased one book so far "Building electric guitars" by Martin Koch. I'm awaiting arrival and will check out your suggestion as I'll want a small reference library before I begin. I think it's going to be a blast.

bbach

 

Beauty is in the eye of the beer holder.

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I honestly don't think you'll screw this up if you take your time and have GOOD plans and some acurate measuring tools.

 

I'm terribly slow with my work and find that it pays off in the end.

Start with scrap and make a prototype and then move on to the real wood.

 

? How good are your specs & exactly what work do you want done?

I still think guitars are like shoes, but louder.

 

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Originally posted by Guitars are like shoes. But louder.:

I honestly don't think you'll screw this up if you take your time and have GOOD plans and some acurate measuring tools.

 

I'm terribly slow with my work and find that it pays off in the end.

Start with scrap and make a prototype and then move on to the real wood.

That's a good suggestion. There is a lot of scrap wood around here from various projects that I could experiment with. Right now things are in the "intelligence gathering" stage. (I know that the word intelligence does not belong in a paragraph about me, but I couldn't think of a better word to use). There is not question about a couple things. I want a neck through body design, high quality maple with an incredibly well matched maple top, ebony or Brazilian Rosewood fretboard, and some excellent P90's. Probably I will use a similar head stock shape as an LP or PRS. I'm thinking double cut. I don't know what how drastic of a shape I'm going with. I definately have a lot to learn about truss rods on neck through designs. I'm going to set up two tone pots, two volume pots, and a three way switch, but I don't know the exact specs of the electronics yet. I do have a finish in mind. I paint cars and I want to duplicate a fantastically bright white diamond finish with black knobs, black P90's or cover, and gold hardware. That with the ebony or black rosewood fretboard will be a beautiful showcase for my music room. (not that I won't play it). No pick guard. I believe in pick guards, I just don't have a personal taste for them over a beautiful archtop finish. I don't know what I want to do with the headstock yet. I may want that in white diamond with gold tuners. Gotta do some thinking. Wouldn't it be nice to get my hands on some guitar design software so I could play with some designs and color choices.

bbach

 

Beauty is in the eye of the beer holder.

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Stew mac offers programs for designing guitars and pickups.

 

They also offer truss rods, ready for install.

Truss rods do the same thing on a neck-through or a bolt on instrument, so that should make no difference. Perhaps when it comes to the actual placement of wrench point...

 

For prototyping, start with butcher paper, or drawing paper in large sheets, bigger than the guitar you plan to build. Draw your design full size, 1:1 scale. This will simplify things like p/u and bridge placement to some extent, although there are set formulas you can use.

This has the additional benefit of aiding template construction, thereby assisting lay-out work. You can cut out pieces of your drawing, lay 'em on your wood, trace and cut.

 

Oh, and check this out:

www.projectguitar.com

mucho useful info.

 

Hope this helps... Good luck!

 

Peace,

 

wraub

 

I'm a lot more like I am now than I was when I got here.

 

 

 

 

 

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Originally posted by wraub:

Stew mac offers programs for designing guitars and pickups.

 

They also offer truss rods, ready for install.

Truss rods do the same thing on a neck-through or a bolt on instrument, so that should make no difference. Perhaps when it comes to the actual placement of wrench point...

 

For prototyping, start with butcher paper, or drawing paper in large sheets, bigger than the guitar you plan to build. Draw your design full size, 1:1 scale. This will simplify things like p/u and bridge placement to some extent, although there are set formulas you can use.

This has the additional benefit of aiding template construction, thereby assisting lay-out work. You can cut out pieces of your drawing, lay 'em on your wood, trace and cut.

 

Oh, and check this out:

www.projectguitar.com

mucho useful info.

 

Hope this helps... Good luck!

 

Peace,

 

wraub

Thanks Wraub. I couldn't find anything on Stew Mac that suggested that they have design software. They do sell some "how to" on video and dvd. I think to properly computer design anything, you would need some pretty good CAD software. That stuff is pretty much out of reach of a simple diy guy. I do know an engineer or two, but I don't think I'm going to have them get involved with the design.

bbach

 

Beauty is in the eye of the beer holder.

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Hey Bob,

Do you still have an old computer that runs a dos based OS? DOS, Win 3.X, 95 or 98 around? If so I'll email you a CAD program that, with some figuring out, you could use for your designs. Or, I'll host the files on my website for your downloading pleasure. It's an obsolete, but good, CAD program.

If you don't have an old horse laying around you can pick one up at a thrift shop for little or nothing. Shoot, a pentium 75 runs it fine.

 

Our Joint

 

"When you come slam bang up against trouble, it never looks half as bad if you face up to it." The Duke...

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Originally posted by daklander:

Hey Bob,

Do you still have an old computer that runs a dos based OS? DOS, Win 3.X, 95 or 98 around? If so I'll email you a CAD program that, with some figuring out, you could use for your designs. Or, I'll host the files on my website for your downloading pleasure. It's an obsolete, but good, CAD program.

If you don't have an old horse laying around you can pick one up at a thrift shop for little or nothing. Shoot, a pentium 75 runs it fine.

Thanks Bill. I found a page of free CAD design products, some commercial and powerful and they work with XP. Here is the link http://www.freebyte.com/cad/cad.htm#architecturalsystems. Hey, why are you covering you face in your avatar? By the way Bill, email me from your home because I re-formatted and forgot to back up my adress book. Thanks.

bbach

 

Beauty is in the eye of the beer holder.

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I passed this on to somebody else some time ago so here it is again....

 

commander_fluff@yahoo.co.uk is the guy in the UK that I purchased full scale 4 drawing sets of plans from. He's taken calipers and depth gages to all of the popular models and made up CAD drawings that are very well done.

 

I have a blueprint duplicator at work so I made copies to cut up for tracing out lexan templates. This helped me make router guides for pickups and neck pockets.

Handy?... what do you think.

 

With the proper layout dimensions you can make an LP, Tele, Strat, P Bass or what ever and design and personalize it to look like what ever turns your crank.

THere are freeware fret scaling utilities out there on the net. Just type in "fret scaling software" into your favorite search engine.

I still think guitars are like shoes, but louder.

 

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