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Most skilled guitar player alive: Carlos, Jeff, Eric, Kirk Etc...


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Originally posted by rog951:

Of the four you mention, I'd pick JB as having the best chops. I'm sure the player that currently has the best technique is someone I've never heard of because I'm too old! :D I'll cast my vote for Eric Johnson though; he maybe doesn't have the absolute best lead chops out there but his rhythm/chording chops blow me away. Plus, he has TONE chops. So, if you take those three "categories" and average them, I think EJ eeks out most of the shredders in an overall chops competition. JMHO.

I wouldn't say that. Hammett's chops are giving way certainly, but their far better than any current player, and Beck is still way better than any current rock player I can think of. Although many of the older guys are past their physical prime, they certainly have as much wisdom and knowledge as anyone else out there.
Shut up and play.
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Phil deGruy, Jimmy Bruno, Russell Malone, Dave Fiuczynski, Wayne Krantz, Dave Tronzo, Scott Henderson, all guys who have amazing skills, all do things differently, and all of whom are not in the general public consciousness. I'll go so far as to say that the 'skills' level of most rock guitarists, from a harmonic standpoint, from a melodic standpoint, from a physical chops standpoint, simply do not stand up to comparison with most jazz or even country players. This is not to say that they're not good at what they do, or that their playing's not valid, but that music's not a contest. If it moves you, great. If it doesn't, find what does. Comparing note density, picking speed, or any such stuff isn't music, it's wanking.
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Best guitar technique, tone, musicality and versatility I've ever heard is from a guy in Nashville named Jack Pearson. He's played with the Allman Brothers a lot since Warren Haynes left. That's not where he shines though. He's also in a blues band called the Nationals - they smoke! First time a saw him he was playing jazz in a lounge in Murfreesboro, TN and was totally amazing. When I first saw him with the Nationals I expected crap because I'd never heard a real jazzer who could play the blues without messing it up. Boy was I wrong! Totally incredible.

 

Originally posted by D-Prime:

For me great chops means Zakk Wylde, Kirk Hammet aint got nothin on him :P

Zak was at a jam session here and Jack was sitting in with him. The story is Zak said something to the effect of "Don't worry buddy, I'll hang back." Jack proceeded to shred the poor guy.

Mudcat's music on Soundclick

 

"Work hard. Rock hard. Eat hard. Sleep hard. Grow big. Wear glasses if you need 'em."-The Webb Wilder Credo-

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This must be one of the most ridiculous questions ever asked. How could you ever pick “The best at their chops” Rock, Jazz, Classical, and Country (just to mention four general styles) all have there own players that have left there mark and continue to influence there respective styles. But no player is an island. Jimi Hendrix helped Vai and Stariani, and Wes Montgomery helped Eric Johnson. Remember Liona Boyd and Segovia? What about Danny Gatton – talent beyond description! And Albert Lee is arguably one of the best at what HE does. Remember DiMeola, Pat Martino, and oh yeah – Frank Gambale – my goodness. Lets face it, all are part of the total. The question was, or is, “Who do you think is the most skilled in their chops?” My answer – Shut up and play your guitar! (And if you get the chance, listen to some of the players listed above).
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Originally posted by Mudcat:

Best guitar technique, tone, musicality and versatility I've ever heard is from a guy in Nashville named Jack Pearson. He's played with the Allman Brothers a lot since Warren Haynes left. That's not where he shines though. He's also in a blues band called the Nationals - they smoke! First time a saw him he was playing jazz in a lounge in Murfreesboro, TN and was totally amazing. When I first saw him with the Nationals I expected crap because I'd never heard a real jazzer who could play the blues without messing it up. Boy was I wrong! Totally incredible.

 

Originally posted by D-Prime:

For me great chops means Zakk Wylde, Kirk Hammet aint got nothin on him :P

Zak was at a jam session here and Jack was sitting in with him. The story is Zak said something to the effect of "Don't worry buddy, I'll hang back." Jack proceeded to shred the poor guy.
I saw Gregg on tour a few years ago and he had a "jaw dropping" guitar player with him... I'm pretty sure it was Jack. He played through a Fender Twin, with a custom "strat-type" guitar with no tone control, just a single volume control. By rolling the volume up or down, he got the most "beautiful" singing sustain and tone that you could imagine... then roll back into the clean rhythm parts... It couldn't have sounded better!

 

Does he have any original material you could suggest?

 

guitplayer

I'm still "guitplayer"!

Check out my music if you like...

 

http://www.michaelsaulnier.com

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Originally posted by Mudcat:

 

Zak was at a jam session here and Jack was sitting in with him. The story is Zak said something to the effect of "Don't worry buddy, I'll hang back." Jack proceeded to shred the poor guy.

GASP!!! :eek::eek::eek:

 

Man would i ever pay some serious cash to see a tape of that!!!

 

I am sorta curios to what kinda jam session it was, i mean Zakk kicks serious ass when taking on other heavy metal shredders but ive never quite liked his take on jazz and blues, to me it just sounds like Zakks heavy metal soloing with heavy emphasis on the notes and intervals that made the scale "Blues" or "Jazz"... i think i would prefer something a little slower and more heartfelt like SRV or something! :freak::freak::freak:

YtseJam your Majesty!
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Originally posted by guitplayer:

 

Does he have any original material you could suggest?

 

guitplayer[/QB]

I understand he did release a solo album sometime within the last few years. I have no idea what the title or label is. Sorry! :confused:

 

BTW - Makes no difference what kind of rig he plays through. He used a late 70s solid state Yamaha amp for years. Sounded like tubes - all in the fingers! :thu:

Mudcat's music on Soundclick

 

"Work hard. Rock hard. Eat hard. Sleep hard. Grow big. Wear glasses if you need 'em."-The Webb Wilder Credo-

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Originally posted by D-Prime:

Originally posted by Mudcat:

 

Zak was at a jam session here and Jack was sitting in with him. The story is Zak said something to the effect of "Don't worry buddy, I'll hang back." Jack proceeded to shred the poor guy.

GASP!!! :eek::eek::eek:

 

Man would i ever pay some serious cash to see a tape of that!!!

 

I am sorta curios to what kinda jam session it was, i mean Zakk kicks serious ass when taking on other heavy metal shredders but ive never quite liked his take on jazz and blues, to me it just sounds like Zakks heavy metal soloing with heavy emphasis on the notes and intervals that made the scale "Blues" or "Jazz"... i think i would prefer something a little slower and more heartfelt like SRV or something! :thu:

I think the jam session was during NAMM week or something like that and I believe it was at the Exit Inn. My buddy who was there implied it was just a straight forward rock-n-roll jam. This was a few years back so I don't recall the details.

 

I suspect Jack could hold his own in any modern style, whether it be blues, jazz, rock or metal. If youever see they guy you wouldn't believe the way he can play. Totally unassuming looking. You'd never suspect he was a monster guitarist.

Mudcat's music on Soundclick

 

"Work hard. Rock hard. Eat hard. Sleep hard. Grow big. Wear glasses if you need 'em."-The Webb Wilder Credo-

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Originally posted by P-berger:

It's hard to say how any one particular guy can be the best, but I totally agree with the Allan Holdsworth and Al DiMeola mentions, they're both amazing. Eric Johnson is crazy good too, you should check out the G3 Live in Concert CD, it's got Satch and Vai on it too (!!), also worthy mentions. What about J Frusciante? I think rhythmically he's just incredible.

 

Another dude no one's mentioned is John McLaughlin, you should really check him out and see why. Mad electric stuff with the Mahavishnu orchestra (early 70s) and alot of ridiculous acoustic guitar in the later 70s and onwards. Also Paco de Lucia? Has no one heard of him?? Honestly, he blows everyone that everyone's mentioned out of the water. I've got one album for everybody...Friday Night in San Francisco...get it and you'll see why!!

I agree. I'm amazed how little credit is usually given to the unarguably best player in the world now. Paco de Lucia. He's really really worth checking out. I saw a documentary where Al di Meola and McLaughlin among other giants acclaimed him as the best. My pick is Django though
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Straight Jazz - Lenny Breau - unbelievable technique

Jazz/R&B - Larry Carlton - consistently tasteful

Rock - Carlos Santana - you can always recognize Carlos

R&B - Steve Cropper - invented a genre

Overall - Grant Green - the bridge between Wes Montgomery and Motown

Tied with

Jimmy Hendrix - Still sounds fresh today

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seems that some people failed to get the context of this topic. the heading for the topic was, "who do you think is the most skilled in their chops: Carlos Santana, Jeff Beck, Eric Clapton, Kirk Hammet,(Fill in your nominees here)..." to try to look cool just by mentioning a name such that most have never heard rather than paying attention to the context is quite inconsiderate and rude. oh, how 'bout Pat Metheny? well that would be fine if the topic was jazz style but it happens to be something else. get the idea everybody? could "Paul Galbraith" or "Christopher Parkening", if i handed them a strat and marshall setup, do a perfect first take on "eruption"? does the heading for this topic denote "country" or "jazz" or "classical"? i'm disappointed some people post on here just to make the point about how "high art" they are. i could "high art" drop names and places you've never been - so what? with all that said and out of the way, for the TOPIC, my heart goes to Eric Johnson.
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PEOPLE !!!! WHAT IS WRONG WITH YOU ALL!!!

HAVE YOU NEVER HEARD OF SHAWN LANE !!

BILLY GIBBONS LITERALLY FELL OUT OF HIS CHAIR WHEN HE HEARD HIM PLAY.. HE EMBARASSED TED NUGENT SO BAD AT HIS OWN CONCERT THAT HE WOULDNT SPEAK TO HIM AFTERWARDS!!! IF YOU APPRECIATE TECHNICAL ,YOULL LOVE SHAWN. BLOWS AWAY ANY GUITARIST THAT I HAVE HEARD IN 45 YEARS. NO SHIT!!!!!!!!!!!!

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I think we all need to sit back and realize that we have forgot to mention one of the greatest guitarists who ever lived...Randy Rhoads. Some of the best guitar playing I've ever heard came out of Randy Rhoads during his years with Ozzy in 82-3. :thu: He was a technical wizard...one of the first to begin incorporating a classical influence. Not only was he a great lead player, his dynamics were amazing as were his chordal riffs.His use of harmonics tops anyone i've ever heard, and the pentatonic scale should be named for him. His solos to Children of the Grave and Crazy Train gave me chills.
"With most guitarists, their guitars are an extension of their penis...with Randy, he was an extension of his guitar. Theres a difference." -- Ozzy
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Originally posted by Spencer_EVH:

I think we all need to sit back and realize that we have forgot to mention one of the greatest guitarists who ever lived...Randy Rhoads. Some of the best guitar playing I've ever heard came out of Randy Rhoads during his years with Ozzy in 82-3. :thu: He was a technical wizard...one of the first to begin incorporating a classical influence. Not only was he a great lead player, his dynamics were amazing as were his chordal riffs.His use of harmonics tops anyone i've ever heard, and the pentatonic scale should be named for him. His solos to Children of the Grave and Crazy Train gave me chills.

Randy has always been one of my favorites, however the topic is about players that are still with us. It was such a shame to lose Randy. The thing about him was that he played with real feeling, even when he was being really technical. There are too many players who just go up and down a scale and don't put any emotion into it.
"I look for whatever will cut the deepest... whammy bars and wah wah pedals can't be used as just gimmicks. They have to reflect and express your feelings." - Jeff Beck
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