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Any thoughts on re-stringing one string at a time versus removing all at the same time inorder to thoroughly clean the guitar? Is the lack of tension with all strings removed a no-no for the neck? Thanks for your input.

 

This message has been edited by Dkleiner@nex-i.com on 04-20-2001 at 01:12 PM

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I always remove all the strings, clean the fretboard and restring. I have never had a problem doing it that way. I would be interested to know how all of you do it out there...
So Many Drummers. So Little Time...
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My 2 cents

 

Take all the strings off, clean the frets and the fingerboard with beeswax and turpentine.... re string ..... and fly!!

 

TTFN

Simon http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif

...remember there is absolutely no point in talking about someone behind their back unless they get to hear about it...
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I understand why people want to take all their stings off and give their neck a good cleaning... But I'm more inclined to go a string at a time on my strats or other guitars with a floating tremolo system. It's WAY faster to retune a strat if you only do one string at a time and stay with the same string gauge. Otherwise it's a real hassle tuning up again...

 

I know, I know... Simon... Not a problem with my Les Paul!

 

guitplayer

I'm still "guitplayer"!

Check out my music if you like...

 

http://www.michaelsaulnier.com

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posted by guitplayer:

>>> But I'm more inclined to go a string at a time on my strats or other guitars with a floating tremolo system.

============================

 

I have a Jackson with a Floyd. I always change the strings on at a time on that. I don't play it much anymore, so I forgot. Getting the guitar back to pitch is a big pain when you take all the strings off a tremolo git.

So Many Drummers. So Little Time...
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That's funny... I've been completely unstringing all of my Strats for 23 years, and I never have a problem getting back into tune. Maybe you should check your setup. I don't know about other types of trems, all my other guitars are hardtails, but I never have a problem with a correctly setup strat trem.

Scott

(just another cantankerous bastard)

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KHAN

 

I have been noticing a lack of inserts in your posts. I am very dissapointed! http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gifhttp://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gifhttp://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

 

 

I also take all the strings off then get busy. I no longer own guitars with Floyd Rose tremolos - But I know what you mean they are a pain in the ass if you take all of the stings off. Seems like the bridge never wants to settle down.

 

God I remember the days breaking a string on a Floyd guitar. That too is a whip!

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BK Said:

>>>KHAN

 

I have been noticing a lack of inserts in your posts. I am very dissapointed!

==============================================

 

Inserts are like swearing words. If you use them all the time, they lose their impact.

...................................... http://cwm.ragesofsanity.com/s/big/Duhard.gif ............................

 

This message has been edited by KHAN on 04-20-2001 at 07:45 PM

So Many Drummers. So Little Time...
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I have always read that one string at a time for changing strings. The "professional string changers", you know, the guys in the big expensive music stores and the guys that manufacture our beloved toys, claim that changing all strings at once can be hard on the neck, causing it to bend one way or another, warranting repair. They say, if you do remove all strings at once, loosen them gradually and when you restring, tighten them gradually. All to allow the neck to accustom itself to the difference in tension. I take every one of my guitars and once a year and clean them thouroughly and oil the fretboard, meaning, all the strings come off at the same stinking time. Oh well, ignorance is bliss or is it stupid?

Psalm 33:3

The best instrument you have, is your heart.

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For my Strat and G&L I take the strings off all at once, never had a problem. With my Washburn P 2-90 that has a Buzz Feiten setup I have to do the one string at a time thing, I found out the hard way that you do NOT wan't to take all the strings off at one time with a guitar using the Buzz Feiten tuning setup!!

 

Clarification, I don't have a Floyd on any of my guitars.

 

This message has been edited by Stratman on 04-21-2001 at 03:45 AM

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jef5f wrote:

>>They say, if you do remove all strings at once, loosen them gradually and when you restring, tighten them gradually. All to allow the neck to accustom itself to the difference in tension.>>

 

Bang on jef5f, The one thing I forgot to put in my post... It is crucial that anything done to a guitar on re stringing/ cleaning has to be gradual so as not to cause any damage... no matter how slight.

Guitplayer

HA HA!! Yep I also got rid of all my floyd rose guitars and yes I always changed them one string at a time..... But I always felt they played worse than my Les Pauls and Strats because they never got the benefit of the thorough cleaning... I still have a Washburn J9 with a bigsby trem and that is an utter bitch!! Love the tone though so I can't part with it http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif I take all the strings of that one at one time and clean as I do the Les Pauls... Its a bummer but worth the effort!

 

TTFN

Simon

...remember there is absolutely no point in talking about someone behind their back unless they get to hear about it...
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Great info guys.

 

Floating vibratos (I'm harping, but tremelo, is a variable gain. Vibrato is variable pitch. And I know, the manufacturers sometimes repeat this mistake in their advertising.) are definately a pain in the butt when it comes to complete string changes. Does anyone know of a simple way to bring a floater to tune?

 

I might point out a few tips for those of us who rarely travel with our instruments. If you're flying, always reduce the tension on your guitar, especially if you're departing and arriving in very different weather conditions. (Heat/cold, humid/dry.) You can seriously damage an instrument for the reason mentioned in another post, avoid fast, drastic changes.

 

Neil

It's easiest to find me on Facebook. Neil Bergman

 

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Good points Neil.

 

As far as a tip with floating "vibrato's", (I stand properly corrected!), I find that if I ever have to take all the strings off, it helps as I'm restringing to overcompensate as I tune each string for the first time since each strings tension changes as the neck bows from the added tension and the vibrato moves to compensate.

 

To say that more clearly: if you start with the high E for example and tune it to pitch, then tune the B string and so on, each new string that comes close to pitch changes the pitch of the other strings. So by anticipating this effect and tuning a bit sharp on the strings, it reduces the number of times I have to go through and adjust all the strings. With some experience, I can get down to three or four retunes versus 8 or more trying to tune to pitch each time.

 

In terms of heat or cold changes hurting your guitar, I also am concerned about finish checking due to these conditions particularly when I've got my Les Paul with its finish.

 

guitplayer

I'm still "guitplayer"!

Check out my music if you like...

 

http://www.michaelsaulnier.com

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I always change one string at a time. I too started this practice because I'd been told by lots of people that it was bad for the neck to have such drastic changes in tension so often. You guys that take off all the strings at once, do you buy new guitars often or have you had the same ones for many years? If you've had them for many years, have you never had neck problems?

 

As for worrying about finish checking on my Les Paul, it was already way too late to worry about that by the time I bought mine. http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gif No matter, though, that's part of its charm.

 

--Lee

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Originally posted by Tedster:

I always did the one at a time thing...I always thought the sudden change of tension was crappy for the neck.

 

Ted is the first one to get this question right. http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif

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Just to offer my opinion-

I used to take all the strings off my Charvel each time, clean the neck and add a drop or two of lemon oil, especially in winter, and restring-after wiping the strings down too. But I always had a heart palpitation when the bridge went slamming into the body due to no tension, and I have since decided that one string at a time is preferable even though it`s a pain to clean the neck. Maybe like Lisa says, take all the strings off once a year or so. I have also had several bad experiences taking guitars back and forth internationally and now I try to avoid it as much as possible, even if it means buyimg an extra guitar-which I have done.

I`ve been told several times that the humidity, rather than the air temp, is what causes wood to bend or warp. If one is traveling to a distant place, timing it so the climate is as close as possible to your current location may help. In Japan most apartments and many businesses must use portable heaters. I am taking my new electric back to the U.S. this summer and leaving it there-no way does it sit in an unheated apartment all winter. Double that for an expensive acoustic.

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Originally posted by Lee Flier:

You guys that take off all the strings at once, do you buy new guitars often or have you had the same ones for many years? If you've had them for many years, have you never had neck problems?

 

I've had a few of my guitars for a looooonnnnngggg time, and (aside from typical fret wear, and some of the finish wearing off the backs) never had problems with the necks.

 

Well... there was that one neck that snapped in half... but that was a different story. http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

Scott

(just another cantankerous bastard)

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fet wrote:

>>Take all the strings off at once. I've done it for 35 years on 35 guitars - no trouble yet. If a guitar can't take this, it is too delicate for me to use. >>

 

Hey fet

can't argue with that one bro!!

 

Simon http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/biggrin.gif

...remember there is absolutely no point in talking about someone behind their back unless they get to hear about it...
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While I think that the odds of actaully damaging the neck by taking all the strings off at once is very low, here's my point: The tension of the strings is offset by the tension of the truss rod. Depending on the specific guitar, removing all the strings causes the neck to bend back, possibly quite a bit. While the neck really shouldn't be damaged by this, I think it's possible, for example, that it might not return to the original curvature...hearing that truss rod creak makes me a little uneasy.

 

Anyway, what I don't understand is what you *gain* by putting the quitar through this, aside from making it a little easier to clean.

 

Tom

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Tom, you can hear your truss rod creak?!?!?! Man, that CAN'T be good! What kind of guitar are you playing? Maybe time to get something with a sturdier neck.

 

Some years ago, a friend of mine was worried about alternate tuning because of the strain it might put on the neck. To demonstrate how much stress a neck can take, and put his mind at ease, I put a Tele neck across two blocks and stood on it. It didn't bend at all. Now, I don't suggest doing that too often, but I only weighed about 180 back then, and I know a neck can support well over 300 pounds. I weigh about 220 now, and I'd still be willing to do it. I'd bet money it won't effect the neck.

Scott

(just another cantankerous bastard)

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Scott,

 

Wow...based on that I guess the one-at-a-time thing is pretty paranoid http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/smile.gif. Come to think of it, dropping the arm of a strat to the body not only takes the tension off...it does it real real fast. I play mostly strats, and changing one at a time is less of a hastle tuning wise.

 

As far as the rod creaking, I've heard the rod creak against the wood on guitars when all the tension is taken off, not on any of mine however.

 

Tom

 

 

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<>

 

??? explain please. mixed together?

i usually change one string at a time. but not cause of the neck or the whammy bar. i play out a lot and i break strings a lot. if i take all the strings off the guitar, when it comes time to putting them on, i just might not have a full set to restring with, which leaves the guitar in worse shape than i started! my hands sweat, so i break lots of a's and d's as well as high e's. until i started buying bulk loose strings, i can't tell you how many packs of incomplete strings i had! i still have more low e's than i know what to do with....

 

-d. gauss

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Good point with temp, fantasticsound-

I think if nothing else, that humidity effects may be a little easier to keep control of. I`ve heard ` well if it`s cold, just keep it in the case`, but I`ve never been convinced about that. I mean, they`re not airtight...

Ya, I`ve broken my share of strings live-one time I had two go in the same song! the single strings are usually not available in brands I like either.

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