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Living Colour Returns! Relive the magic!


Jimmy James

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Yes. They are back for a reunion tour and will playing in a watering hole near you. No new album, just a tour to see if they can stand each other long enough to generate some heat and do another album.

 

I thought they were a great innovative band with very inciteful socio-political lyrical content. Humor too. Great musicianship, and they did a great job of blending various musical genres and made it still accesible to the mosh pit, the headbanger crowd, the afro-centric, and MTV. Vernon never caved in to convention with those predictable 80's Bon Jovi Scorpian style guitar solos either. He did his own thing and smoked in his own unique voice.

 

The band was great before they emploded and now they've sold out to do a reunion tour. I don't care I miss'em. Saw'em in Chicago just before Vivid went ballistic and they were amazing. I'll never be the same. It gave hope to all those black guys who wanted to rock hard and weren't allowed to, and tried to take back rock and roll from the Robert Plants and David Coverdales of the world. Any fans out there? What's your favorite colour?

 

 

http://artists.mp3s.com/artists/144/oscar_jordan.html

 

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Originally posted by Jimmy James:

Yes. They are back for a reunion tour and will playing in a watering hole near you. No new album, just a tour to see if they can stand each other long enough to generate some heat and do another album.

 

Cool. They were the best example of intelligent musicianship pushing rock music forward. Towards the end of the Muzz Skillings period the solo sections were basically jazz, it was a great thing. Vernon got ragged for being "not GIT clean", but he was daring, walked out on a limb in every solo and *improvised*, for real - something I don't think anyone really does anymore, at all. Glover - great singer. Calhoun - I still hear drummers screw up trying to put his little triplet hat accent lick into things.... Killer player.

 

My only wish would be that Vernon would turn the digital reverb off.

 

The band was great before they emploded and now they've sold out to do a reunion tour. I don't care I miss'em.

 

I hope they can pull it together; I'm sure they would end up putting a an amalgamated twist on the detuned grungy hip hop thing going on now that would put a stamp of "this is how it's done... *when you can REALLY play".

It's exactly what's needed right now.

 

What was ultiamtely cool about them was that they showed skilled fusion musicians can absolutely definitely make killer *pop* music if they want to - setting the stage for the Dave Matthews band now. When will people learn that it's the guys that can actually *play* that have the most to offer the pop world, in the proper context, instead of being shunned? Or should I say when will the labels learn?

 

 

http://www.mp3.com/chipmcdonald

 

This message has been edited by Chip McDonald on 04-07-2001 at 04:37 AM

Guitar Lessons in Augusta Georgia: www.chipmcdonald.com

Eccentric blog: https://chipmcdonaldblog.blogspot.com/

 

/ "big ass windbag" - Bruce Swedien

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To your point, Chip-when will the labels learn? never, that`s when.

Living Colour got a big rocket boost from Mick Jagger, who got behind them and the labels listened. As soon as they were through the door it slammed shut right behind em. Where are the imitators, like the million and two teen vocal types? they`re out there but the labels stopped taking calls.

As a minority guy who loves to rock it`s especially irritating.

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Originally posted by skip:

To your point, Chip-when will the labels learn? never, that`s when.

 

If the record industry is still around 50 years or so from now, it will. It will have to. Apathy towards recording artists regarding Napster and royalties is directly related to percieved investment in true talent. It's why Dave Matthews still sells records (don't know what he was thinking on the new one though...), while fly by night G/D/C 3 chord acts are probably finding their worth divebombing faster than before.

 

The industry seems to be winding up into a faster cyclic frenzy, which is I *think* what's behind the Nashville autotune craze - it looks like there's new artists being trotted out *everyweek* now. I think ultimately this will imbue an attitude on people that will make them categorize artists into two categories: gimmick and "talented".

 

The labels will eventually see the advantage of having a roster of Stings, U2's, Dave Matthews, STP, that both consistently sells *and*

morphd/matures over time, over instant gratification acts that they'll have to crank out at faster and faster rates.

 

Hmm.

 

There may be a market adjustment ahead for the industry, I think Napster will force it and the labels will realize they're still getting returns off of *respected* artists versus bs "artists".

 

I can't see people digesting the same marketing bs we're getting now 50 years from now. Although - I *can* pessimistically see a time when if they don't revert to *quality* over quantity, the music business *as* a business peters out into a concept akin to "neo-modern folk music".

 

http://www.mp3.com/chipmcdonald

Guitar Lessons in Augusta Georgia: www.chipmcdonald.com

Eccentric blog: https://chipmcdonaldblog.blogspot.com/

 

/ "big ass windbag" - Bruce Swedien

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The bottom line is money. It's completely money driven. Supply and demand. Had Living Colour been even more successful than they were, you can bet that we would have seen alot more Black Rock bands signed with lots of product on the shelves. 24-7 Spies got some juice and Fishbone who were already very happening got more juice. Remember Body Count?

 

There were a lot of great Black Rock bands I knew of in LA back then who were connected with the Black Rock Coalition but never got their shot. They got close but by the time they stepped up to the plate Living Colour's popularity was starting to die down. Where's the market?

 

Everybody wants a sure thing and the powers that be wanted to be comfortable knowing they would get a return on their investment. So the fever died and so did alot of Black Rock bands. It was safer to invest in groups that sounded like Alanis Morrissette and Sugar Ray rather than a bunch of freaky Black guys with loud guitars who knew where the "One" was. Where's the market? I mean who'd gonna sell to the guy in Nebraska?

 

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http://artists.mp3s.com/artists/144/oscar_jordan.html

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I would like to think that people will give manufactured artists the fleeting glance most of them deserve, and stay with those who have so much more to offer, even if they don`t look like pinups or don`t stay twenty for thirty years. I just think it`s unlikely. The reason for the fast turnover of acts these days has a lot to do with producers and managers making more of a name for themselves, and having a pretty much interchangable roster of their own acts-I`m thinking mostly of hip-hop artists here, but it`s a trend. There`s also the technology of making records more and more with mostly sequenced, digitally programmed music backing up an artist-no need to worry about getting a particular lineup, just punch and go. It`s a lot easier to crank stuff out in a hurry. The only people I see really benefiting are hit songwriters. Whoa, gotta run-back later.
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