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Casio's new Privias (128-note poly!)


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At long last... Casio has increased the polyphony of the Privias. The new PX-200 and PX-800 have 128 note polyphony plus string resonance effects. This is some of the best news yet coming from NAMM.

 

Press release:

 

The Privia series is Casios innovative line of digital pianos that provides authentic piano sound coupled with scaled hammer action for an exquisite grand piano feel, making it possible for people to be as inspired as if they were playing on ivory. The new AIF offers acoustic resonance which reproduces the resonant effect of a grand piano damper pedal and a powerful 2 way Bass Reflex speaker system.

 

Heres a sneak peak at the latest Privia series offerings:

 

PX-200

The PX-200, releasing in March, is a brand new addition to the Privia family that caters to the Professional Piano enthusiast. This 88 key digital piano is equipped with the tri-element AIF sound source (Acoustic and Intelligent Filtering system). The sound source provides 128 note polyphony and allows notes to reverberate naturally without being cut off during high-speed passage, giving the sound of a grand piano. The PX-200 carries a 16 watt (8w per side) sound system to effectively recreate the

sound of a Grand Piano. Additional features include:

 

162 tones

82 songs

Expanded song memory

SD card slot

USB and MIDI

2 extra speakers that allow for 2-way Multi Speaker Bass Reflex System

PX-800

The PX-800, releasing in March, is another brand new addition to the Privia line. The PX-800 is equipped with the new revolutionary tri-element AIF sound source (Acoustic and Intelligent Filtering system). The sound source provides 128 note polyphony and allows notes to reverberate naturally without being cut off during high-speed passage, giving the sound of a grand piano. The PX-800 carries a large 40 watt (20w per side) sound system to effectively recreate the sound of a Grand Piano. A custom wood stand, 3 pedal unit is included giving the PX-800 a unique European design and elegant appearance. Additional features include:

 

162 tones

82 songs

Expanded song memory

SD card slot

USB/MIDI

 

Also: www.priviapiano.com

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Somehow, I've never been able to take Casio seriously as a pro instrument. Maybe because you only see them in mass marketers. Which brings me to the question.....what happens when it breaks?

 

Mike T.

Yamaha Motif ES8, Alesis Ion, Prophet 5 Rev 3.2, 1979 Rhodes Mark 1 Suitcase 73 Piano, Arp Odyssey Md III, Roland R-70 Drum Machine, Digitech Vocalist Live Pro. Roland Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-1.

 

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A friend of mine gigs with a Casio WK3500 but he spray painted the back in case the audience have any ideas. I have both a Privia PX300 and a WK3500 for over three years now. The Privia has been played on at least an hour everyday. So far no problems on both. They are amazing keyboards for the price. I was not taking Casio seriously before until checked them out and was amazed(for the price.) With such low prices if it breaks just get a new one. Many keyboards are made in China nowadays and I don't think there is a great difference in quality between different makes.

Am looking forward to the new PXes.

Regards, calvero

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What do you do when ANYTHING breaks?

 

Casio's Privias have made a pretty big impact. I didn't care much for the first generation of Privias but the second generation definitely made an impression. They really felt good to play and were the most lightweight of all the DP's out there. I still use my Radio Shack piano (Casio CDP-100) as a controller on stage and it plays wonderfully. It's also one of the most solid keyboards I've played too and I play with a heavy hand.

 

The main thing that kept me from fully embracing the Privias was sound quality and polyphony - the sound quality was passable on models like the PX-555 but the polyphony was completely unacceptable for pro use. The action, ease of transport, and overall value made Privias popular as ideal for newbie pianists since they were often some of the cheapest.

 

If the PX-800 features an improved sound along with the string resonance and 128-note polyphony, and it's still the lightest and least expensive DP's on the market, it'll sell like crazy and I'll be one of the first to own one.

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That's what I'm hoping for...a better sound. Same price, better sound and it will be a knockout. Their biggest invention is that hydraulic key action, and of course light weight.

Hamburg Steinway O, Crumar Mojo, Nord Electro 4 HP 73, EV ZXA1

 

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Quote by the Pro:

------------------------------------

What do you do when ANYTHING breaks?

------------------------------------

 

Bring it back to MY DEALER to get if repaired or replaced. I don't know what Best Buy's return policy is, but have you ever tried dealing with non music store employees about a musical instrument? Hell, sometimes its difficult dealing with REAL music store employees! I just don't get a warm fuzzy feeling buying professional instruments at a big box store that doesn't service anything.

 

 

Mike T.

Yamaha Motif ES8, Alesis Ion, Prophet 5 Rev 3.2, 1979 Rhodes Mark 1 Suitcase 73 Piano, Arp Odyssey Md III, Roland R-70 Drum Machine, Digitech Vocalist Live Pro. Roland Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-1.

 

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I don't know of any music stores that handle Casio, and I really don't want one anyway. :bor:

 

 

Mike T.

Yamaha Motif ES8, Alesis Ion, Prophet 5 Rev 3.2, 1979 Rhodes Mark 1 Suitcase 73 Piano, Arp Odyssey Md III, Roland R-70 Drum Machine, Digitech Vocalist Live Pro. Roland Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-1.

 

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Originally posted by MikeT156:

Somehow, I've never been able to take Casio seriously as a pro instrument. Maybe because you only see them in mass marketers. Which brings me to the question.....what happens when it breaks?

 

Mike T.

I can tell you exactly what happens with the Casio when they break. They get refurbished if possible and sold in the Casio stores throughout the country. I went to the Casio store about 3 months ago or so and I saw so many WK series in this store being sold as refurbished. This is by far one of the most unreliable keyboards ever made ( In fairness to Alesis they tried very hard to give them a run for their money with the Fusion) The sales person at my local store is a piano player and he said I would never buy a WK because I see so many of them come in to the store refurbished and the one we do sell come back alot with problems. He said even the newer models in the WK series are coming into the store refurbished. In fairness to the Privia series, they seem to be more reliable as there were only new models in the store

Begin the day with a friendly voice A companion, unobtrusive

- Rush

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cant find any info on google

 

the worry is has the weight remained the same or similar on the 200 as say the 300 ..12.5 kg or 310.....11.9 kg

 

as some of thier other fully featured units have increased in weight where they now have other manufacturers in the same weight catogory.

 

If they dont keep the weight advantage they lose thier biggest attribute.

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Originally posted by MikeT156:

I don't know of any music stores that handle Casio, and I really don't want one anyway. :bor:

 

 

Mike T.

If you consider Guitar Center and various Online Music stores as stores, they are quite abundant. I get to try various Casios at GC myself. It is sitting next to Yamahas and Rolands so something has changed.

 

The old CDP-100 we all bought at Radio Shack are now Casio badged and on display at GC. Except for a higher price of course.

Hamburg Steinway O, Crumar Mojo, Nord Electro 4 HP 73, EV ZXA1

 

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Originally posted by MikeT156:

I don't know of any music stores that handle Casio, and I really don't want one anyway. :bor:

 

Mike T.

Mike, you're a great guy and I respect your posts a ton, but I think you're letting old biases cloud your better judgement.

 

If I recall, you have a Motif 8. Maybe you don't gig that much, but if you did, a CDP-100 and a MotifES Rack should be on your consideration list. Unless, of course, you make heavy use of splits and sliders...

 

I know we're not going to change your opinion on words alone, but from the praise for these low weight, low cost, amazing feel controls by myself, the pro, jazzwee and many others, I'd think you'd at least consider the fact that Casio may not be making the same $10 keyboards they were selling 20 years ago.

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Originally posted by MikeT156:

Quote by the Pro:

------------------------------------

What do you do when ANYTHING breaks?

------------------------------------

 

Bring it back to MY DEALER to get if repaired or replaced. I don't know what Best Buy's return policy is...

30 days. Get the replacement plan and you've got 2 years. We carry a lot of laughable $200 boards and the Casio Privia, forget which one though. It has a really nice sound and feel to it, I was very suprised.

 

As far as music stores go, Guitar Center carries them as well, though they could be called a big box store too.

 

Seriously though, I'm not a digital piano guy at all, but I enjoyed the Privia, go give it a try before you hate on it too much :P

"...Keytar in a heavy metal band is nothing more than window dressing" - Sven Golly

 

Cursed Eternity - My Band

Dick Ward - My Me

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I play a WK3700. Carry it back and forth to practice and gigs. Have had it for a year without one problem whatsoever. It is a great board whether it is low priced or not. I plan on buying a CTK 900 as well--this is the 61 key version of the WK series. Same sounds, same layout, everything all for $200.

 

As for the name on the back of the board: I have been playing too long and am too confident in my abilities to really care what people think about the name on the back of my keyboard. I am only worried about making sure the notes that come out it that I play are right.

 

Casio has made significant improvements in their products over the past few years. They're just not toys anymore. I love em.

 

BD

"With the help of God and true friends I've come to realize, I still have two strong legs and even wings to fly" Gregg Allman from "Ain't Wastin Time No More"
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The bias against Casio is still quite strong all around. Many friends of mine would not even consider a Casio. They think they are toys although Casio made some pro keyboards back in the 80s. I must admit I was one of them too and having since been "converted." The best thing is to checkout for themselves before forming any opinions. Of course if money was no object I would get the best Yamahas and Rolands. But for the prices of Casio, it does the job very well.
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Quote by dabowsa:

-------------------------------------

Mike, you're a great guy and I respect your posts a ton, but I think you're letting old biases cloud your better judgement.

 

If I recall, you have a Motif 8. Maybe you don't gig that much, but if you did, a CDP-100 and a MotifES Rack should be on your consideration list. Unless, of course, you make heavy use of splits and sliders...

 

I know we're not going to change your opinion on words alone, but from the praise for these low weight, low cost, amazing feel controls by myself, the pro, jazzwee and many others, I'd think you'd at least consider the fact that Casio may not be making the same $10 keyboards they were selling 20 years ago.

-------------------------------------

Yes, I am playing gigs these days. I have an Motif ES8, not the previous model. But as of Winter NAMM, my ES8 is "obsolete", at least according to one Yamaha rep. :rolleyes: Never take me too seriously. I tend to be a bit sarcastic (I'm sure you've noticed that before :D )and can generally be described as a wise ass. (Really?) Actually, I don't need a digital piano, and yeah, old biases do cloud my judgement at times. But, Korg has come a LONG WAY in the last twenty years, so you can teach old dogs new tricks. ;) Maybe Casis can be a serious player.

 

Cheers,

 

Mike T.

Yamaha Motif ES8, Alesis Ion, Prophet 5 Rev 3.2, 1979 Rhodes Mark 1 Suitcase 73 Piano, Arp Odyssey Md III, Roland R-70 Drum Machine, Digitech Vocalist Live Pro. Roland Boss Chorus Ensemble CE-1.

 

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I simply think that any graded hammer piano with 128-note polyphony, string resonance effects, GM voices and internal speakers that only weighs 26 lbs and is well under $1000 USD merits at least a look no matter who makes it. That describes the new Casio PX-200, which appears to have the same form-factor as previous Privias. You can download the owner's manual here.
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Well, I can't act two faced here. My keyboard (CDP-100) does have the label covered up with a sticker. It does not say Casio. Actually it says Radio Shack. If it said Casio now I'd probably leave it alone. Somehow Radio Shack doesn't evoke any musical pedigree...

I still can't believe we only paid $299 for this a year ago.

Hamburg Steinway O, Crumar Mojo, Nord Electro 4 HP 73, EV ZXA1

 

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I just bought a PX310 and it's great, anyone looking for a budget piano is crazy to not consider it, the only other new board in it's price range is the Yamaha P70 and the Casio kicks it's butt, but I'm a little pissed that this is coming out like right after I bought the 310, couldn't they have announced this before the Holidays? or better yet have the product available before hand? I guess they wanted to get rid of old stock first but now I'm looking at my 310 like, just pissed at Casio.
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Originally posted by Jazzwee:

Well, I can't act two faced here. My keyboard (CDP-100) does have the label covered up with a sticker. It does not say Casio. Actually it says Radio Shack. If it said Casio now I'd probably leave it alone. Somehow Radio Shack doesn't evoke any musical pedigree...

I still can't believe we only paid $299 for this a year ago.

Ditto to all of the above. I covered "Radio Shack" with black duct tape.

 

BTW: I found this tiny little picture of the new PX-800's back, and you can see that it now just says Privia on it and not Casio. I have a Casio gigbag for my Radio Shack piano that also just has the Privia logo on it. Perhaps Casio has taken a hint...

 

http://casio.jp/emi/privia/images/px800/img04.gif

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I feel confident with the build quality of PRIVIA keyboards..

in fact far more confident than some other manufacturer's products [yes I have owned close to 40 or 50 keyboards over the years] as I reckon Casio sells far more product than any other manufacturer and can only do that if they have little return for repairs...

 

gone are the 1980's when casio started with the casio tone...dont forget casio has been a manufacturer since 1959...they are not johnny come lately's and could not survive if thier products kept failing all the time.

 

The only thing you will find is the plastic will scratch easily...but this is not restricted to casio products...one of the reasons the casio is light is the clever use of plastic ..

 

look underneath you will understand how strong the design is by looking at the moulding..strength and lightness in moulding.

 

But as a consequence plastic marks easily...so just be careful..besides wood scratches,alluminium scratches,painted steel scratches...

all keyboards can suffer from scratching.

and Casio isnt the only manufacturer to embrace total use of plastic on a keyboard...ie roland, alesis,korg,yamaha etc

 

my Privia PX 300 keyboard was a well used model that came from one of casios main reps...he used this keyboard to demo all over the place and he also gave me a one year guarantee so he was confident that this used keyboard would last and last

 

...it was scratched and marked as a consequence but the keys feel solid as if they were new in a shop...

everything works as it should and only up close does it look scratched...

 

besides being scratched it may tempt me to do a custom spray job on mine because Ive always wanted to but could never bring myself to try it on a non scratched unit.

 

ps I have got the privia carry bag...a wonderful quality bag that holds the keyboard,footpedal,powerpac ,music stand,and books and even filled it is well under 15kgs all up.magic.and still can be slung over the shoulder.

 

Viva casio for building the first truley lightweight PORTABLE piano feeling keyboard....but cudos to Technics who pioneered it with the P30...ironically two Boom chicca companies who bought the world true portability in digital pianos.

 

ps I keep checking out casios website for any new exciting products...perhaps a master controller using the privia feel,but with a usefull master keyboard midi implementation...

dont laugh they had previously made the best "sling on" the AZ 1..ie keytar with good midi specs [remember Thomas Dolby]...i have one, it even had aftertouch....use this controller specs with a privia keybed and we have a decent 88 note master controller.

but now an improved polyphony Privia wow....I only thought they'd jump to 64 note but are embracing "nows" polyphony.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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George Kaye, a dealer who is at the NAMM show, posted the following info on the new Casio pianos on the Synth Zone Arranger Forum:

 

"The PX800 will be the new name for the 128 note polyphonic model that is portable yet looks like a small piano with roll down (dust) cover and speakers built into the stand.

Here's the specs right off their sheet:

88 full size naturally scaled hammer action keys, brand new triple element zpi sound source with filter, 128 note polyphony, touch sensitive, new bass reflex sound system, acoustic resonance system, SD card slot, Stand included (2 x 20 watt)

Retail Price is $1199 Map price is $899"

 

"Another new model is called the PX200.

All the same specs as the PX800 but with 162 tones, 20 rhythms, 72 songs, midi, usb, SD card 2 x 8watts. Retail $899 Map $699"

 

"The new model that looks like an expensive home type model is called the AP500. With all the same specs as above but in a beautiful wood cabinet with 3 pedals and 2 x30 watt system. Map is $1399"

 

BTW: all of the new Privias mentioned above allow for a three-pedal unit. It is included with the PX-800 and AP-500 but is an optional accessory for the portable PX-200.

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Is the new Piano 1 the same sound but with resonance and more polyphony as on the old PX-310?

 Find 600 of my jazz piano arrangements and tutorials for educational purposes at patreon.com/HarryLikas Harry was the Technical Editor of Mark Levine's "The Jazz Theory Book" and helped develop "The Jazz Piano Book."

 

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tried downloading the manual for the 200 but does not work

 

anyone got an idea on the weight

 

also someone posted it had only 20 rythyms...

sounds incorrect...maybe 120 is correct?

 

has casio released any info other than a supposed manual download.? any links

 

ive tried the upmarket models i think it may be the 700 and the sounds are great and numerous...if it sounds as good as i guess it will but with extra polyphony it will be a winner...just as long as they dont increase the weight as they have done with the 700 and other upmarket models.

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