Jump to content


Please note: You can easily log in to MPN using your Facebook account!

Sound Modules for live use


YamahaMatt

Recommended Posts

I have a yamaha P-120 stage piano that has midi capability onboard. However, i want more sounds than the yamaha offers. I have been looking at sound modules on ebay and was wondering if there are any jewels out there to look for. Something that will give me a lot of good quality synths and ambient sounds. My main usage will be live, in a church worship band playing modern contemperary worship music.
Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • Replies 9
  • Created
  • Last Reply

If you don't want to spend too much money, you could go for a Roland JV 1080. It's pretty old but I still like the synth sounds. For the bread and butter sounds like AcPianos and EPs I would still use your P120.

The JV gives many tweaking capabilities and is also "updateable" by expansion cards. I got mine on ebay for 200.

 

http://www.rolandmusik.de/ftp/pub/fotos/JV-1080.jpg

 

The good thing is there are usually 5 or more of them at the same time on ebay.

The Dromb Bopper
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I picked up a Roland XV-5050 a few years back and was very very pleased with it. It's pretty flexible and Roland do a full PC editor when you hook up via USB so it's easy to tweak patches and combinations too. Plus, you can expand by way of the SRX expansion boards, although this wasn't something I felt the need to do.

 

It may provide a little more than you need, but it's a great module - only one rack space too. Plus, it isn't expensive either. Certainly not in the UK anyway!

 

Definitely worth checking out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd try to find a Korg Trinity-TR or perhaps a Korg Triton-Rack. You might be able to land a Yamaha Motif-ES Rack as well.

"We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."

- George Bernard Shaw

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not exactly a module, but my Alesis Micron has done many tours of duty. Like you, I play in church settings a lot. My road rig is just a P80, Nord Electro 2 Seventy Three and the Alesis.

 

The Alesis' pads, lead sounds, etc, sound HUGE and can really fill up the room.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Get a second keyboard.

 

Maybe I should make this more emphatic. Get a second keyboard!

 

Even if you take the time to set up splits and layers, breaking out two manuals and lining up MIDI channels and send and receive info for both the module and P120, then mapping program changes, and having to constantly re-do this each week, it's just a P120 and not a capable controller for P&W.

 

Here's how having two boards works for for me in this app: I have my pianos and a few pads on the bottom, and everything else on the top board. Then I'm free to go back and forth, calling programs up independently from each other, flowing with the music and praising God without having to constantly fight my equipment.

 

Give it some thought.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally posted by Bill H.:

Get a second keyboard!

I second Bill absolutely. I am sure you could do this with any manufacturer's workstation. I use a Roland XP30 as a second keyboard for praise and worship. (Younger sibling to the JV1080). It's fairly cheap now, and it's got lots of sounds that are more than adequate for live use. It's significant weakness is a pinched sounding piano, but you have the Yammie for that.

 

In performance mode, you can have 8 sounds that are one key-press away. Sixteen if you don't mind pressing two buttons. I have choirs, pipe organs, pads, b3's all stashed away, and call them up whenever the song needs a different timbre. Different performances can have different stacks, for example you might have a couple of horn sections, B3 and clav in a performance for more upbeat songs. Imagine a crescendo section where everything needs to get broader quickly. You can play a phrase with just french horns, second line the strings are added in, third line the chorale joins in. Each one of those was a button press. So you have three lighted buttons at the end of that section.

 

That's just an example. The great thing is, whatever second keyboard you get, it's worth making sure it is multi-timbral, and you can turn to those timbres, by simply moving your hand to this "second keyboard". You will save yourself a lot of head scratching, and your rehearsals will be much smoother (trust me on this).

 

Hope this helps,

 

Jerry

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...