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Casio CDP-100 and the Privias...


rhess

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I've been doing some research on the Casio keyboard products after being dissatisfied with the key action of Yamaha's consumer products. In this process, I've heard good things about the Casio CDP-100. So, being that the online version of Guitar Center listed it as in stock, I decided to head over and take a look.

 

Unfortunately, GC didn't have one on display. But they did have a selection of other Casio models, mostly Privias. So, I tested a few and discovered the PX-700 is fitting to my tastes.

 

I've heard some rumor that the CDP-100 has a similar (or identical) key bed to the new Privias. Is this true? Is there any way to find out (I already called Casio, and they gave me the run-around)?

 

I also note that the CDP-100 isn't listed in the menu of the Casio site, although you can find it by searching their site. I also see it is still in stock in many places. Has it been discontinued? What is its successor (I know that the PX-700 is built similarly, although its stand is integrated, unlike the CDP-100)?

 

Finally, does anyone have any further opinions about Casio products?

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Casio makes a fine keyboard, if you avoid the crappy light up toy-esque ones. I have a WK, and find it to suffice my every need. (Maybe it could use weighted action - but then again, I only payed 250 for it).

 

There's been some good talk about the Privias on this forum - try a search. I would give the board a shot, and if it doesn't reach your expectations, send it back.

 

Oh, and as far as I know, CDP's are still going in production, I think Casio just removed it from the site so it would not deter from the Privias. As for the key action, I'm assuming it's identical.

Casio WK 3200: $250.00

Behringer Ultratone FX900: $180.00

Roadrunner bag: $40.00

Intrument cable: $25.00

Radioshack Stand: $10.00

Rocking out of the cheapest equipment you can find: priceless.

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EDIT: Whoops, sorry. I didn't read your post fully :) .

Casio WK 3200: $250.00

Behringer Ultratone FX900: $180.00

Roadrunner bag: $40.00

Intrument cable: $25.00

Radioshack Stand: $10.00

Rocking out of the cheapest equipment you can find: priceless.

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Rhess, there was a CDP-100 at the GC in Los Angeles. The keybeds are supposedly different for each model line but I can honestly not tell. All of a very realistic piano feel. The weight will truly prepare you for the weight of a real piano.

 

I never actually compared a CDP-100 against a Privia side by side so it is hard to compare the sound. I tried some higher end Casios at GC and I'm getting more and more impressed. I couldn't remember the model but it was in a built-in stand.

 

If they get around to really improving their samples, they could really make a big dent. Right now, the key action is the best in my mind (for emulating a real piano). Maybe a little too hard for organ.

Hamburg Steinway O, Crumar Mojo, Nord Electro 4 HP 73, EV ZXA1

 

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Skythe and Jazzwee, thanks for the quick replies.

 

So are the keybeds different for different model lines, and that's it?

 

If you get any Privia from PX-100 through PX-700 are they the same? Would this be true of other manufacturers, generally speaking?

 

Thanks for taking all my questions. =D

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What I'm saying is that the keybeds are different perhaps by part number. However, I cannot tell any difference, or anything that can indicate if one is better than the other. Usually, manufacturers will share a key action with multiple products. This is definitely true of Yamaha which groups it into two kinds, graded hammer, and not graded. Several keyboards use each kind. Again here, there maybe different key action part numbers but for all intents and purposes, newer actions feel the same among several keyboards from Yamaha.

 

Action aside, I'm sure there are plenty of "sound" differences from the PX-100 through 700, but whether or not it matters to you is another issue. More sounds (but not impressive) are not necessarily a plus. Also some other models have arranger features while the CDP-100 is really a simple single purpose instrument -- a piano.

Hamburg Steinway O, Crumar Mojo, Nord Electro 4 HP 73, EV ZXA1

 

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Don't forget to try actions out on a sturdy stand.

 

Its no fair trying out a P120 on a single-X stand and a Privia on a display counter. The single-X will always add some mush to the action.

 

I play my CDP-100 on a WS550 and love it, btw.

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I had to play a Privia when it was the only 88-key backline they had at a festival in Argentina. The sound was fine for live but can you believe there were no quarter inch outs on the thing?? It had 1/8"s but no 1/4"s! Thank God I happened to have an 1/8" to 1/4" headphone adapter on me or they would have had to mic it!! I don't think they have addressed this either, although I could be wrong. I would get something with 1/4" outs, like a Korg SP-250.

Kawai C-60 Grand Piano : Hammond A-100 : Hammond SK2 : Yamaha CP4 : Yamaha Montage 7 : Moog Sub 37

 

My latest album: Funky organ, huge horn section

https://bobbycressey.bandcamp.com/album/cali-native

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I've played the CDP100 and most Privias, and their keybeds feel 99% the same to my hands, maybe some minor differences, but that could be due to different heights and/or types of stands.

I'm tempted to get a CDP100 for its lightness and good action, but I don't consider its sound good enough for exposed 'pianistic' playing. I'd use it as a controller for a Kurzweil K2600R or MicroEnsemble. For reharsing, though, it would be perfect.

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Originally posted by Bobadohshe:

I had to play a Privia when it was the only 88-key backline they had at a festival in Argentina. The sound was fine for live but can you believe there were no quarter inch outs on the thing?? It had 1/8"s but no 1/4"s! Thank God I happened to have an 1/8" to 1/4" headphone adapter on me or they would have had to mic it!! I don't think they have addressed this either, although I could be wrong. I would get something with 1/4" outs, like a Korg SP-250.

Funny you should mention that. I realized after I posted this thread that the CDP-100 doesn't have line outs (1/4") either. So, I looked at the other Privia models. Only one of the products has the line out...the PX-310. The 310 actually has L/R Line In and Line Out, both 1/4".

 

So now I'm looking more at the PX-310, if it has a similar (or identical) action to the PX-700 which I tried. I'll probably go back to the GC and try the 310 in depth.

 

As a side note--and this may sound strange--I prefer the Casio keybed because it is a little softer than the Yamahas. This is because the acoustic piano I most prefer is slightly softer (ironically, it is a Yamaha piano). No digital keyboards really match its feel...but I can't say I have a right to expect them to.

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Originally posted by rhess:

As a side note--and this may sound strange--I prefer the Casio keybed because it is a little softer than the Yamahas. This is because the acoustic piano I most prefer is slightly softer (ironically, it is a Yamaha piano). No digital keyboards really match its feel...but I can't say I have a right to expect them to.

That does sound strange rhess. I have an S90ES, a CDP-100, and a Yamaha U3 Acoustic all in the same area. The S90ES is way lighter. The CDP-100 is very close to the acoustic in weight. I like the action of the S90ES, mind you, but it matches the acoustic only if the damper is up.

 

I agree with Marino quite a bit on this. It makes a great controller. I have a MIDI to USB converter on it (M-Audio Uno). However, amplifying the sound of the piano for a gig is not the best sounding. No sustain whatsoever in the higher notes. For practice it is great. For this reason, the 1/8 inch outs is not too relevant for me. If I need to amplify, I just pass the headphone out to a cheap little mixer.

 

I imagine the PX310 piano sound to be about the same. The Casios are great for practice but if you're going to be discriminating with the sound, then you'll need to think more about the Yamaha P70 or something (no 1/4 outs either though).

Hamburg Steinway O, Crumar Mojo, Nord Electro 4 HP 73, EV ZXA1

 

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I think I might need to explain what I mean by soft:

 

When I press a key on the Yamaha acoustic piano, it feels reasonably soft. Not light (like a non-weighted keyboard), but soft. That is, I don't have to push a key too hard to get a note. Other pianos I have played require a tad more force to get a note, and don't seem to be as suited for a softer touch. Perhaps that is due to the manufacturing quality of those other acoustic pianos. Regardless, I tend to be a soft player.

 

As far as the sound quality...if I were to be amplifying the sound, I'd probably do it through a dedicated sampler which has better sample quality.

 

It is far less expensive to purchase a good sampler and accompanying software/hardware and use the keyboard as a controller in a live environment than to purchase a keyboard with built-in high sample quality.

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I wouldn't say because a certain action is lighter that the quality of the piano is neccesarily different. I've played some phenomenal instruments that had a mild action. I've also played some poor ones that you had to play really heavy handedly.I have noticed on the actions of some Yamahas that they tend to be a little lighter. I've also played heavier Yamahas. Pianos also tend to get broken in after time and become a little easier to play.

 

But the moral of the story is getting something similar for live playing would definitely ensure a smooth performance. I know that my live rig plays lighter than my piano at home and it's always a pleasant surprise when I can fly all over the place.

Kawai C-60 Grand Piano : Hammond A-100 : Hammond SK2 : Yamaha CP4 : Yamaha Montage 7 : Moog Sub 37

 

My latest album: Funky organ, huge horn section

https://bobbycressey.bandcamp.com/album/cali-native

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Thanks for all the feedback.

 

Does anyone know where I can find a copy of the December 2006 edition of Keyboard?

 

I only found out about the mag in the past week or two, and I've been trying to find a copy of the Dec. 06 edition to complete my research (Domesticated Digitals feature article).

 

Unfortunately, every place I've gone to either doesn't have Keyboard or have already switched to January's edition. The online version of the article lacks everything but the intro.

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Sometimes the big music stores have several issues of the same mags. I don't normally recommend Guitar Center, but if there's one near you, they may have several different months of Keyboard in a rack somewhere.

"I'm so crazy, I don't know this is impossible! Hoo hoo!" - Daffy Duck

 

"The good news is that once you start piano you never have to worry about getting laid again. More time to practice!" - MOI

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I had a Casio Privia (I forget which model, but I think it was the PX110) in my teaching studio for about a year. It had about three or four hours use per day max, and most of that was with beginners who hardly taxed it at all.

 

After the year was over, the keybed was sloppy, all worn out, when compared to identical models on the showroom floor.

 

Just my 2cents.

A Boogie-Woogie Video:

 

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Thanks for all the responses. I've got another question (I'm full of 'em):

 

What stand would work best for the Privia PX-310. That is, it should be portable, but solid.

 

I was thinking a Quik-Lok T-20. Would that be the right size?

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I've had the 310 for a month and love it. It was worth paying the extra £40 UK over the CDP, mainly for the line ins and outs on 1/4. I bought the dedicated stand for it but also found it very sturdy on the Ultimate Apex Delta stand.
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I've had the Privia PX-310 for almost a year now, and I love it too. The sound and playability is BETTER than the Yamaha P70 (I'm surprised Jazzwee thinks otherwise). The Privia's ZPI sound chip produces a far more natural piano sound than does the Yamaha's. And the Privia's action ditto, as to the feel.
Alcuin
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Originally posted by Alcuin804:

I've had the Privia PX-310 for almost a year now, and I love it too. The sound and playability is BETTER than the Yamaha P70 (I'm surprised Jazzwee thinks otherwise). The Privia's ZPI sound chip produces a far more natural piano sound than does the Yamaha's. And the Privia's action ditto, as to the feel.

Hey Alcuin804, how are you doing?

 

About my comment, please note that I have a CDP-100, which sounds pretty similar to the PX310.

 

There's not a lot of sustain in the upper registers for jazz playing. Very big difference compared to my S90ES.

 

Honestly, I've forgotten what a P70 sounds like but the Yamaha YPG-625 (which is in the same price range) sounds better than the PX310, although I don't like the key action. And I remember the sound of the old P60, P120 or the current P140.

 

To some music styles, this sound may be ok. But in jazz, sustain is an important sound for a legato feel. I have amplified the CDP-100 for solo piano and it doesn't sound that good. It's a great weighted controller however so it will remain in my gear list for a long time.

Hamburg Steinway O, Crumar Mojo, Nord Electro 4 HP 73, EV ZXA1

 

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With the varying opinions of the perfect action and the perfect sound, the Casio Cdp-100 has half of the 100% that we are all looking for. The action is different than the other brands offer and in comparison to the real thing is ... let's say, just better perhaps close. But to what action?, a Steinway?, a Yamaha grand?, a Baldwin to what? Even grand piano actions all have a different "taste" to the fingertips. I've tried them all, even beat up spinets and consoles where the tips of the keys are chipped and stuck keys. If Casio would ever go deep into there sound architecture and gain a status in quality as other brands, then there would be serious competition. Maybe they'll have in the forcoming future that... perfect keyboard. I've bought my Cdp 2 weeks ago and didn't have time to eq it in my system and went out on a gig with an orchestra. Be careful not to gliss either left to right or opposite becuase my keyboard shifted sideway almost off the stand due to how light it sits on the stand. Overall the best bet is a good piano sound patch off a module. I bought the Kurz Me-1 and I'm satisfied on just making it through the gig and getting paid as well as a good sound. I've thought about getting selling my old Yam p-80 and buying another Casio. For a total of $800 bucks I've upgraded to this year a new action and piano patch which does a better job than what I had for the past five years. (Yam-p80 as a controller and the EMU 2000 with the Coakley piano on ram) And I've visited music stores through the years keeping up with the latest products and to me its a repeat of the same products. That is why I've waited to buy and for less than the latest products out there, I can survive and feel comfortable. My next investment would be the Receptor with vst piano's and see if the Casio improves and use it as controller. Nothing beats it, til now....
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A quik lok stand with the adjustment wheel, very sturdy. But I believe it doesn't matter unless left and right edges are locked in which I don't recall what other stand can do this. And to be honest I have never seen another way of doing a gliss on a piano while holding down the piano with one hand while the other hand sweeps across the keys. (maybe this can be a new technique for the future of digital pianos) The CDP is very light, way too light on the stand, but overall it won't move off on regular playing position.
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I'm not at all sure if the other Casios have the same ZPI sound chip as the Privias, or the same "liquid" action either. Better check Casio's website for that info.

 

I played a Yamaha P-90 for a few weeks (in a start-up band that didn't get off the ground). I really liked it. But when I decided to get my own digital piano, I tried out every make under $1000 I could. I had to conclude that although the Yamahas had a solid, good-quality sound and touch (the long-established, venerable "Yamaha" sound and touch), my own preference was for the more natural sound and feel of the Privia--the "new kid on the block." A matter of personal taste more than anything else.

Alcuin
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