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Victor Borge .... recommend a DVD or two?


Dave Horne

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I'm thinking about buying several DVDs of the great Dane and was wondering which you might suggest.

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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Originally posted by The Hammond Kid:

This DVD contains one of my favorite acts of his, "Inflationary Language" :D

Twoderful routine.

 

By far the most extreme client I ever had. Forty two tunings in fourteen days on a 9'8" Bosendorfer with a truck load of HVAC gear parked in the alley to keep the theatre's temperature and humidity absolutely stable for two weeks.

 

He was a funny guy and an incredible pianist. I spent a couple of hours talking shop with him after a tuning one afternoon. The only time I ever heard him play a piece from front to back without a hint of comedy was a private show for me on that freshly tuned monster in one of the nicest theatres in town.

 

His amazing talent is completely eclipsed by the fact was perhaps the nicest guy to touch planet earth. He treated his hippie kid piano tuner like a peer. I couldn't believe he wanted to blow an afternoon hanging out with me. One of my favorite days in the last half century.

 

Sorry for the tangent. Anything he's got out gets my approval.

--wmp
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The Hammond Kid, thanks for the tip, I'll check it out at amazon.

 

wmp, thanks for the story - great!

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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I read Borge's memoirs a couple of months ago ("The Smile is the shortest distance between two people"), very intriguing but unfortunately it is only available in Danish for now.

 

Most of his jokes originated from the 1930's when he was a very successful comedian in Denmark before the Germans occupied the country. He would probably have stayed there if not the war brought him over to the other side of the Atlantic. He had a very hard time during his first years as immigrant, none of the show agents in New York realized the greatness of this comedian until he started touring down south where people loved him.

 

I have a request from an elderly lady. Well, let's face it, she is an old lady. As a matter of fact, she is dead now. So that took care of it.
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Originally posted by Dave Horne:

The Hammond Kid, thanks for the tip, I'll check it out at amazon.

Glad to be of some help.

 

Originally posted by Dave Horne:

wmp, thanks for the story - great!

+1, That really is a great story.

 

Hopefully you weren't one of the guys needed to move that behemoth of a piano :freak:

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Originally posted by Fogwall:

Most of his jokes originated from the 1930's when he was a very successful comedian in Denmark

I believe that the part of his act where he pronouces the punctuation was originated by George Grossmith if indeed it is not older still.

 

I don't remember where I saw a description of Grossmith's act and could not find a ref online just now. If may have been in a G&S history.

 

If so, given that it is not possible that Victor ever saw George perform one wonders if there was a tradition of piano players/comedians linking the two. This would make a nice little topic for any musicians/historians out there to pursue.

 

I haven't read Vistor Borge's biography. Does it shed any light on this - placing him perhaps, as the last keeper of a tradition?

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