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Instrumental Parts That Made The Song


Eric Iverson

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A spin-off from the Whiter Shade thread.

 

What are some instrumental parts (regardless of the instrument) that were a vital part of the tune, that really made a good tune GREAT?

 

The first one that pops into my head is Steve Cropper's guitar fills on Otis Redding's "Dock of the Bay" - the perfect icing on the cake.

 

Oh, and some of the horn parts on Billie Holiday's small band records.

 

George Harrison's guitar on "My Sweet Lord."

 

Of course, the organ on "Whiter Shade". And Billy Preston on "Get Back". And just about anything by Garth Hudson in the Band.

 

Countless others of course, but I want to hear what YOU guys think!

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One part that always makes me smile when I hear it is the Hammond chords in the chorus of "Have You Ever Seen the Rain" by CCR. Absolutely perfect for the song, and to me one of the signatures.

 

Also the organ work in Steve Miller's version of "Fly Like an Eagle"

"In the beginning, Adam had the blues, 'cause he was lonesome.

So God helped him and created woman.

 

Now everybody's got the blues."

 

Willie Dixon

 

 

 

 

 

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fun topic !!1 .. how about???? ..

 

- Winwoods organ riff in "Gimme Some Lovin"

- Theremin in Baech Boys "Vibrations"

- lots of Manzerak DOORS riffs !!

- synth solo in Steve Miller's "Swingtown"

- Organ in Dire Straits "Walk of Life"

- hmmm .. need to think of more :)

PC1x, Hammond XK1c, Deep Mind 6, MS500 (gig rig)

Kurz PC4, Mini Moog Model D, Little Phatty, Hammond M3, Leslie 145, viscount op-3, Behringer model D, Roland GAIA.. (home studio)

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I take it we're confining the convo to less obvious stuff, so presumably Deep Purple/Black Sabbath/Led Zep et al riffage needs not be mentioned...

 

However, what should be mentioned is Roger Glover's incredible bass groove on "Smoke on the Water" - yeah, everyone remembers that dumb guitar riff - but the bass really powers the verses in that song!

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Edgar Winters' synth on "Frankenstein"

 

Randy Rhoades' guitar solos with Ozzy

 

Prince's piano part in "Purple Rain"

 

Stevie's clav in "Superstition"

 

Peter Gabriel's brass on "Sledgehammer"

 

Bass line in Dennis Edwards' "Don't Look Any Further"

 

Alex Lifeson's guitar part in "Freewill"

 

This is a very short list off the top of my head. :cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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Garth Hudsons simulated Jews harp on Cripple Creek is definitly one of the most unique ones.

 

 

Stevie Wonder,where do you start :confused: . The clav on Supertstition

The synth basslines combined with the piano riff on Boogie on Reggae Woman ,don't forget the harmonica ,just to name a couple. To many to name

 

The fiddle on Orange Blossom Special with the emulated train sounds and shuffle.

 

The intro to Don't take me alive -Steely Dan

The rhodes intro and vamp on Pretzal Logic .

Again, where do you start with Steely Dan

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Originally posted by Griffinator:

I take it we're confining the convo to less obvious stuff, so presumably Deep Purple/Black Sabbath/Led Zep et al riffage needs not be mentioned...

 

However, what should be mentioned is Roger Glover's incredible bass groove on "Smoke on the Water" - yeah, everyone remembers that dumb guitar riff - but the bass really powers the verses in that song!

Well, if we go into Deep Purple, Jon Lord's intro and solo on Machine Head's version of "Lazy" is a rock masterpiece.

"In the beginning, Adam had the blues, 'cause he was lonesome.

So God helped him and created woman.

 

Now everybody's got the blues."

 

Willie Dixon

 

 

 

 

 

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Generally, rock and jazz bands have signature parts that make the song. Anybody who writes in ensemble fashion appears to do this. It's mostly in pop music that melody is somewhat divorced from "accompaniment".

 

Not that there's anything wrong with that. ;)

 

Jerry

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Anthony Jackson's picked and phased bass intro to "(For The Love Of) Money" by the O'Jays. They asked him to write a riff to kick off the song, and it became such a hook all by itself that they wrote him into the credits.

 

You can't talk instrumental hooks without talking Motown. "My Girl" has two of the greatest hooks ever, on bass and guitar, before the vocals ever come in.

"I had to have something, and it wasn't there. I couldn't go down the street and buy it, so I built it."

 

Les Paul

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I Can't Wait - Nu Shooz.

Love is Alive - Gary Wright

Ventura Highway - America

 

If Jimmy Page had made up his own stuff rather than ripping streight from old blues songs I would add Led Zepplin and "Highway to Heaven" to the list.

 

Robert

This post edited for speling.
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Originally posted by RABid:

I Can't Wait - Nu Shooz.

Love is Alive - Gary Wright

Ventura Highway - America

 

If Jimmy Page had made up his own stuff rather than ripping streight from old blues songs I would add Led Zepplin and "Highway to Heaven" to the list.

 

Robert

Robert .a new band I'm in is covering Love is Alive except it is the Gamble Brothers version .
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Originally posted by Griffinator:

The fake string from "Little Runaway" - Del Shannon... Anyone know what exactly that instrument is?!

Yep... that was Max Crook playing what he called a "Musitron" ... I found this on the web for more details:

 

Originally from The Del Shannon website :

Thirty-seven years later, in Del Shannon's small hometown of Coopersville, Michigan, Crook revealed his secret keyboard to del's legion of fans at the annual summer tribute. "The Musitron is a three-octive, monophonic (single-note playing) keyboard with a slide on it that will allow me to play at a range of two-cycles-per-second up to beyond human hearing. Also, I can bend the notes, which was something uncommon at the time for mini-keyboards. I bent the notes in the middle of Don't Gild The Lily, Lily, the B-side of Hats Off To Larry. The Musitron is also totally tunable. I can tune it to anything. I built the Musitron out of a variety of things. A clavioline was part of it, but I also threw in some resisters (too early for transistors), tubes from television sets, parts from appliances, and other such household items. That's basically what it consisted of." And by electronically rigging the grand piano, Crook was able to ripple the notes on "Jody."

http://www.delshannon.com/images/maxsnake.JPG
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