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new player need advice


tippitt

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i am starting to play the piano and keyboard but i am looking for a good learning 88 or 76 key keyboard. one that would help me out by lighting up like thos 61 key ones would be helpful. but i just am looking for a good cheaper keyboard to learn on. i dont need to synth anything, just need it to sound like a piano, since i cant put a real piano in my apartment. thank you for any feedback.
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Welcome to the forum. Believe it or not this question is posted quite a bit... Try searchng around. Here is a good place to start.

 

http://www.musicplayer.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php?/ubb/get_topic/f/18/t/017415.html

 

I myself don't know of any 88 weighted key keyboards that light up. Search for 'Casio Privia' and 'Radio Shack'* and you will see a lot of posts from people who claim that these boards are very good boards - especially for the money.

 

* NOTE: - I don't believe that the Radio Shack boards are available anymore..

I'm just saying', everyone that confuses correlation with causation eventually ends up dead.
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Hmmmn, wouldn't rely on flashing lights if you are going to learn seriously......just my opinion.

 

There really are loads of boards out there that will fit the bill. Depends also a little on what your long term goal may be. Home use only? Proabably to start with.

 

I'd look at Roland or Yamaha keyboards to start with, also the Cassio WK series are pretty good. Also depends a little on budget.....

I found the lost chord
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What does your teacher suggest? You are going to study with someone aren't you? You'll learn a lot faster with someone at your side.

 

We're not having a serious discussion about flashing lights, are we? :rolleyes:

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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The flashing light variety is only available to students under 5 years old. :D

 

If you are serious about learning how to play piano, pick up an instrument closer to one. The Casio Privia is a good starting point.

 

That way, you have a quality instrument to learn and practice on without breaking the bank.

 

Also, follow Dave's advice in finding a good teacher. Might as well start on the good foot. :cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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Originally posted by soundscape:

It does seem to only feature on "toy" keyboards... but that doesn't mean it doesn't work, does it?

Sure, it works fine. Just not something an adult should sit around playing with for long periods of time unless they have one of these too:

 

http://www.razyboy.com/hello/189/984/320/retard%20helmet.jpg

 

;):cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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Originally posted by ProfD:

Originally posted by soundscape:

It does seem to only feature on "toy" keyboards... but that doesn't mean it doesn't work, does it?

Sure, it works fine. Just not something an adult should sit around playing with for long periods of time unless they have one of these too:

 

http://www.razyboy.com/hello/189/984/320/retard%20helmet.jpg

 

;):cool:

Any day now Dave Horne will be telling those with severe dyslexia that they aren't "real men" for using text-to-speech synthesis instead of reading. ;)
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Originally posted by soundscape:

What, real men don't expedite learning with flashing lights? ;)

Soundscape, do you have a personal color scheme that works better for you?

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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Originally posted by soundscape:

Maybe blue would be good.

Will a custom fitted head piece and gloves to match be required as well? ;):cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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Soundscape, instead of commenting on what others suggest, why not try answering the original post.

 

I see a pattern here. ;)

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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I also think it's nice if you can get a teacher; however, don't fret about it if you cannot. There are also good self-study materials (books, CDs, DVDs, etc) out there, so that you can learn on your own and/or supplement any material presented by your teacher.

 

I started off learning piano mostly on my own (primarily by books), because my parents couldn't afford to send me to lessons back then. Yet, I had several piano players both in my family and at church who I could ask questions whenever I needed.

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I guess it depends on the style of music you want to play... but many teachers are all about the classical method, which is... inefficient, boring, and even after years of it, you won't have a clue where to begin if your goal is pop/rock, etc., playing.

 

Above all, a teacher needs to be carefully selected.

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The point of any type of education is to open your mind. Regardless of style, the same music theory and mechanics of playing still apply.

 

While the boring stuff may not appear to have anything to do with your musical goals, you never know when those skills will become of use.

 

When you see a fleet fingered player or a written chord, scale patterns and voicings come to mind like this :idea: instead of :confused:

 

Got it? :cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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Originally posted by ProfD:

The point of any type of education is to open your mind.

My mind is wide open. ;)

 

 

Originally posted by ProfD:

While the boring stuff may not appear to have anything to do with your musical goals, you never know when those skills will become of use.

I'm not saying that the principles they teach are boring, it's *how* and *what* they teach. Practicing some lame tune using two fingers to start learning note timing and sight reading is, IMHO, a turn off. ;)

 

(2000th post!)

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Originally posted by soundscape:

Practicing some lame tune using two fingers to start learning note timing and sight reading is, IMHO, a turn off. ;)

 

(2000th post!)

I'm sure you didn't come into the world saying much but look at you now. LOL! ;)

 

Most folks learn by repetition. Initially, we spend a great deal of time saying the same sh*t over and over again. For some, it just continues throughout a lifetime. :P

 

I knew it was a matter of seconds. Congrats on reaching 2k posts! Ding, ding...new MP member. :cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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Originally posted by ProfD:

Most folks learn by repetition. Initially, we spend a great deal of time saying the same sh*t over and over again. For some, it just continues throughout a lifetime. :P

Yes, that's why you make the repetition fun and not the most boring thing on the planet. If you can make it fun, you'll do it for hours no problem. Besides, I'd far sooner learn a few chords than start on that stuff.

 

(I don't really work on that "linear" learning system left to myself... I'd learn the basics of everything and fill in all the details later... There is NOTHING more annoying to me than a conversation with a teacher like:

 

"OK, but why's that then?"

"Oh well, you don't need to know that right now."

" :( "

 

Then there's when stuff is "simplified" to the point that it doesn't make any sense... if it doesn't make any sense, it just doesn't stick in my memory.)

 

Originally posted by ProfD:

I knew it was a matter of seconds. Congrats on reaching 2k posts! Ding, ding...new MP member. :cool:

Thanks. :)
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Since this thread has traveled from a beginner asking advice, to flashing lights, and now whether one would benefit from boring methods of teaching, I thought I would copy a little material (without permission) from the latest issue of Keyboard Player magazine, a British magazine.

 

This month there's an article about Yaron Gershovsky, the pianist of 27 years with Manhattan Transfer.

 

Quoting from page 12, Dec 2006 issue ...

 

Yaron's advice to keyboard players is: "Practice scales and practice classical music to get your chops, because if you have the basics then you can play anything. The basis is technique, which means those boring things like scales," .....

No guitarists were harmed during the making of this message.

 

In general, harmonic complexity is inversely proportional to the ratio between chording and non-chording instruments.

 

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