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Weighted keys , PC1se vs Nord Stage 76 !


denistu

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Hello,

 

Sorry if I am too anoying with my PC1se vs NS76 comparison but I would really appreciate if someone would be kind to explain the difference in regards to the keyboard action of these two boards.

 

I heard that both are using Fatar keys but from some comments on this forum it seems that there is still a difference btw the two boards.

 

I tried the NS76 in a local music store but they still don't have the PC1se. The store is willing to order one for me but they would keep 10% of the original price if I don't buy it afterwards.

 

I would really appreciate your help.

 

Thanks,

Dennis

Nord Electro 3, Motif ES-6
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The local music store is making you special order the board, just to try it out?

 

I have been a strong supporter of locally owned small business, but these people want you, the customer, to cover their inventory costs, thereby negating one of the major advantages of buying locally.

 

Which raises the question: if you did buy a keyboard there and the keyboard was faulty but covered under the manufacturer's warranty, would the store also require that you pay the cost of shipping the keyboard back to the factory?

 

If so, there goes the other advantage to brick and mortar, with this outfit.

 

Don't mind me--I'm just spouting off on how lousy the world becomes when profit becomes our primary motivation in life....

 

I hope that you find your answer, but from my experience, the feel of a particular keyboard's action is something that one has to experience personally.

 

I played the Nord Stage 88 release 2 last weekend for about an hour, unmolested by salespeople and other customers who can't resist playing the rhythm tracks of neighboring synths, and confirmed two facts for myself:

 

1.) Nord has put together a very appealing sounding set of instruments that are fun to play. I really enjoy playing their Hammond clone--it's not a Hammond organ, but it does share many of the organ's characteristics: key click, horn pop, rotor grind, etc. This particular Stage must have had the percussion turned way up--I've never heard a Hammond sound like this, but that's not to say that I didn't like the sound. The built-in "analog" synth section also has some great sounding stuff. I didn't really spend enuf time with it to learn how it works, but I did like what it added, for instance, as a pad behind the piano.

 

2. The feel of the keyboard is neither here nor there, meaning it is neither an organ nor a piano. The action is too loose and light to be a piano, and too heavy and slow to be an organ. It is unlike any "semi-weighted" keyboard I've ever played. I'm not sure what to make of it, and I imagine that I could get comfortable with it as a piano/controller, but never as an organ. Actually, imho, the only organ I've ever enjoyed playing is a Hammond, even if we're talking "clone-wheel", my XK-2 feels better than any Korg, Roland, or Nord I've played to date, though I prefer the sound of some of the other clone-wheels to my XK-2.

 

Sorry for my rambling. (I haven't been able to come around much lately, so I'm making up for it with my post to you.) What I really want to say, is that you need to go feel it for yourself. No one can tell you if you're going to like how a particular keyboard feels.

 

So keep looking. If you happen to travel out of your area on business, or for the holidays, work in a half-day for a visit to their local music store. For instance, I played the Hammond XK-1 for the first time during a business tip to Manhattan last summer, as there wasn't an XK-1 within 1,000 miles of my home base. (Got to deduct the cost of the trip, too!).

 

Happy hunting.

regards,

 

--kwgm

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It would probably be better to put that 10% in your gas tank and drive a little further away to another music store.

 

kwgm is right in that you want to play both in order to get a 'feel' for what is going on between them.

 

Good luck and welcome to the forum. :cool:

PD

 

"The greatest thing you'll ever learn, is just to love and be loved in return."--E. Ahbez "Nature Boy"

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Originally posted by kwgm:

The local music store is making you special order the board, just to try it out?

 

I have been a strong supporter of locally owned small business, but these people want you, the customer, to cover their inventory costs, thereby negating one of the major advantages of buying locally.

 

Which raises the question: if you did buy a keyboard there and the keyboard was faulty but covered under the manufacturer's warranty, would the store also require that you pay the cost of shipping the keyboard back to the factory?

 

If so, there goes the other advantage to brick and mortar, with this outfit.

 

Don't mind me--I'm just spouting off on how lousy the world becomes when profit becomes our primary motivation in life....

 

I hope that you find your answer, but from my experience, the feel of a particular keyboard's action is something that one has to experience personally.

 

I played the Nord Stage 88 release 2 last weekend for about an hour, unmolested by salespeople and other customers who can't resist playing the rhythm tracks of neighboring synths, and confirmed two facts for myself:

 

1.) Nord has put together a very appealing sounding set of instruments that are fun to play. I really enjoy playing their Hammond clone--it's not a Hammond organ, but it does share many of the organ's characteristics: key click, horn pop, rotor grind, etc. This particular Stage must have had the percussion turned way up--I've never heard a Hammond sound like this, but that's not to say that I didn't like the sound. The built-in "analog" synth section also has some great sounding stuff. I didn't really spend enuf time with it to learn how it works, but I did like what it added, for instance, as a pad behind the piano.

 

2. The feel of the keyboard is neither here nor there, meaning it is neither an organ nor a piano. The action is too loose and light to be a piano, and too heavy and slow to be an organ. It is unlike any "semi-weighted" keyboard I've ever played. I'm not sure what to make of it, and I imagine that I could get comfortable with it as a piano/controller, but never as an organ. Actually, imho, the only organ I've ever enjoyed playing is a Hammond, even if we're talking "clone-wheel", my XK-2 feels better than any Korg, Roland, or Nord I've played to date, though I prefer the sound of some of the other clone-wheels to my XK-2.

 

Sorry for my rambling. (I haven't been able to come around much lately, so I'm making up for it with my post to you.) What I really want to say, is that you need to go feel it for yourself. No one can tell you if you're going to like how a particular keyboard feels.

 

So keep looking. If you happen to travel out of your area on business, or for the holidays, work in a half-day for a visit to their local music store. For instance, I played the Hammond XK-1 for the first time during a business tip to Manhattan last summer, as there wasn't an XK-1 within 1,000 miles of my home base. (Got to deduct the cost of the trip, too!).

 

Happy hunting.

Is he keyboard "weighted" i.e. weights stuck uhder the keys ( big deal) or is it a "hammer action" like a piano. Big difference between the two.
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The Nord Stage uses a hammer action Fatar keybed. I don't know which one. I would classify it as medium weighted. The PC1se uses the same action as on the PC1x. It is lighter than the Stage and in the same league as the RD300SX. I own the PC1se and like the lighter action as I'm using a single keyboard for more than just piano.

 

Here's the Fatar page. As you can see they make a few different models.

 

Fatar

 

Busch.

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Originally posted by kwgm:

.....The feel of the keyboard is neither here nor there, meaning it is neither an organ nor a piano. The action is too loose and light to be a piano, and too heavy and slow to be an organ. It is unlike any "semi-weighted" keyboard I've ever played. I'm not sure what to make of it.......

+1

 

I don't know what the hell to make of it either. The NS action truly doesnt know what it wants to be.....a piano or an organ. While I personally like it, I can see how this would bug some folks. The action seems semi-weighted yet "buttery" to me, for lack of a better descriptive adjective. Just another quirky, intriguing feature regarding this lovely instrument!

"We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing."

- George Bernard Shaw

 

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As Busch said, the Stage action is a little heavier than the Kurz, but it is very fast - I wouldn't play Hammond on it but could easily play clav, and enjoy it, which I can't say of most hammer action keys.

Keys: Hammond SK2, Hammond SK1, Hammond SKpro, Korg Vox Continental, Waldorf STVC

Amplification: Line6 L3T, Yamaha DBR-10, Presonus Air 10, Leslie 122V

 

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