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Moog Voyager?


bc002k

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I've been hearing how amazing the Mini Moog Voyager is. Like it's the holy grail of all synthesizers. I don't know much about it, other than it's basically a reissued version of the Mini Moog from the 70's.

 

I understand the mini moog is monophonic - one note at a time. To me, this seems like the synth would be pretty limited. You couldn't even play chords on it!?

 

It costs like $3000, and everyone raves about it..can someone shed some light on how a synth that can only play one note at a time is so expensive and amazing?

 

Keep in mind, my keyboard knowledge isn't too great..don't flame me for being ignorant ;-)

 

Thanks guys.

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Originally posted by bc002k:

It costs like $3000, and everyone raves about it..can someone shed some light on how a synth that can only play one note at a time is so expensive and amazing?

 

Keep in mind, my keyboard knowledge isn't too great..don't flame me for being ignorant ;-)

 

Thanks guys.

Think of it like comparing a Toyota Corolla to a Lamborghini Countach. Not everyone is going to appreciate the Lamborghini (say, a soccer mom who needs to get 4 kids around town), but that doesn't mean it's not worth the coin to a connoisseur.

 

I'm going to guess that you're a younger player (say, in your 20's or younger?); the cache of this instrument is often lost on members of newer generations who were weaned on sample-based instruments, rather than the early days when synths were new and exciting, and required one to learn how to operate the entire thing to make any sounds, as opposed to the push-and-play world that exists now. ;)

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I am 22. I own a basic Yamaha Digital Piano. I've never used anything complex with samplers or sequencers or whatever. I just don't know much about synths.

 

It's just the idea of something monophonic being so expensive that puzzles me. My mind views a monophonic keyboard as being limited, since much of playing keys is based on playing chords and such..which you couldn't do.

 

But I'm sure there's some depth to a Mini Moog that I just don't know about.

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A trumpet is monophonic. A saxaphone is monophonic.

 

Which is more expressive, the monophonic instrument or a polyphonic rompler playing sax or trumpet samples?

 

The monophonic instrument of course. Not just because it's the real thing, but because the player is concentrating more on performing a single note, whether through pitch bend, breath controller, aftertouch, or whatever.

 

I have poly synths that I still set up plenty of patches for mono operation.

 

Think of a monophonic synthesizer as a solo instrument and you will kind of be on the right track.

Moe

---

"I keep wanting to like it's sound, but every demo seems to demonstrate that it has the earth-shaking punch and peerless sonics of the Roland Gaia. " - Tusker

http://www.hotrodmotm.com

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Originally posted by bc002k:

My mind views a monophonic keyboard as being limited, since much of playing keys is based on playing chords and such..which you couldn't do.

That's a reasonable assumption.

 

If you are accompnaying a pop song on a piano for example, the typical thing to do is to plink out the chords. But there are other ways to think. Here's a song from Roger O'Donnell's new album:

 

 

All instrumental sounds are Voyager.

 

Jerry

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Being monophonic doesn't limit a sax. It's just a different mindset for playing. Great for melodies, solos, bass lines and more. You might be better of with a used NordLead 2 (it's polyphonic) as a second keyboard. It can provide much of the same vibe for much less cash and it has knobs for most every editing function so you can get you feet wet in synthland.
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So a piano cranking out chords = 'rhythm guitar'

 

And a mini moog = 'lead guitar'

 

Something like that?

 

Can you create a lot of cool sounds, I presume?

 

And is would it be worth it for someone like me to buy one? My technical ability isn't bad..it's my knowledge that's lacking. It's sort of a moot point now since I don't have anywhere NEAR enough money to consider buying one..but down the road.

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yep, at 22( I am a late bloomer), you can't acquire overnight the knowledge/wisdom/experience of someone at 45-55.

 

But you can ask good questions. The MiniMoog was never intended to be a standalone keyboard. To puzzle over mono doesn't scratch the surface.

 

Folks in the 40/50's observed how keyboard idols of our generation (in the 70's) absolutely wailed on the Mini as an incredible solo instrument.

 

Telling you that the Mini has a warm analog sound is basically a hint. There are numerous details one can expound on such as oscillators and the Mini's interface.

 

Suffice to say it is inspiring. But it may not do nothing to you until you try it.

 

How about a comparison - Your big brother telling you about sex and you are 12 years old

Why fit in, when you were born to stand out ?

My Soundcloud with many originals:

[70's Songwriter]

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Don't rush out to buy it just because you think you should. Personally, I tried it and didn't connect with it. I never connected with the original MiniMoog either. When you get a chance to see one, you can tell just by the construction one of the reasons they are so pricey.

 

I'd like to try the Lil Phatty myself.

 

My newest synth is on the Nord Stage, on which I have set up many polyphonic pads and many monophonic solo voices.

Moe

---

"I keep wanting to like it's sound, but every demo seems to demonstrate that it has the earth-shaking punch and peerless sonics of the Roland Gaia. " - Tusker

http://www.hotrodmotm.com

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A nordLead 2 is available here.

 

The Nord a good place to start. The things you want to study for synthesizers are waveforms and their harmonic content, filter types and how the differ, and envelope generators. Once you get a handle on that, the world of programming your own unique sounds will open up to you.

 

There are plenty of pros here who can offer great advice when you have questions.

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Originally posted by bc002k:

I am 22. I own a basic Yamaha Digital Piano. I've never used anything complex with samplers or sequencers or whatever. I just don't know much about synths.

That would explain it. ;)

 

Note that there's absolutely nothing wrong with either being unaware of the Minimoog's qualities, or not appreciating them. It's definitely not for everyone, and that's what's great about our community. I'd wager there are hundreds of classical pianists out there who could easily justify $80,000 for a top-quality grand piano, but couldn't justify spending the $3k for the Minimoog either.

 

It's just the idea of something monophonic being so expensive that puzzles me. My mind views a monophonic keyboard as being limited, since much of playing keys is based on playing chords and such..which you couldn't do.

Because in your experience, chords are key (pun intended) elements to creating music. :thu:

 

But I'm sure there's some depth to a Mini Moog that I just don't know about.

Yep, but again, there's no guarantee that you're going to appreciate those qualities once you learn about them.

 

It's not for everyone, but for those select few, $3000 is a steal. ;)

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Originally posted by bc002k:

I've been hearing how amazing the Mini Moog Voyager is. Like it's the holy grail of all synthesizers. I don't know much about it, other than it's basically a reissued version of the Mini Moog from the 70's.

 

I understand the mini moog is monophonic - one note at a time. To me, this seems like the synth would be pretty limited. You couldn't even play chords on it!?

 

It costs like $3000, and everyone raves about it..can someone shed some light on how a synth that can only play one note at a time is so expensive and amazing?

 

Keep in mind, my keyboard knowledge isn't too great..don't flame me for being ignorant ;-)

 

Thanks guys.

It will be great if you do some research on the Moog instruments. Check out recordings by guys like Jan Hammer (Mahavishnu Orchestra, Jeff Beck, Miami Vice soundtrack) and Rick Wakeman (Yes, solo artist) and Keith Emerson (Emerson, Lake, and Palmer) and Chick Corea (Return to Forever, solo artist).

 

Eventually, you may develop an appreciation for the Moog sound. Maybe a good, cheap way to dabble with that sound is through a soft synth like the Minimonsta or the Minimoog V.

 

But as for spending your hard-earned dollars, if I were you, I would ONLY buy instruments that make sense to you. Don't spend a lot of money on something just because other people think that it's cool. It may not be right for YOUR sound and YOUR musical vision.

The Black Knight always triumphs!

 

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Let me ask this..

 

I'm interested in a synth where I can create a lot of different sounds. My main interest is vintage type sounds (I love synth sounds from the 70's). I like really lush, ambient sounds.

 

I'm not into techno/rave type stuff at all.

 

Does anyone know what the best synth would be that?

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Originally posted by bc002k:

Is it true you can create almost any sound you want on these (if you know how to operate it, that is)?

No, not any sound. You won't be able to create a realistic piano sound, nor a sax, nor a violin. That's not the point of the instrument, though.

 

Take a listen to the clip that linwood linked to above. Try making that solo with a digital piano! ;)

 

(nice clip, linwood... great example!)

 

You can take a few minutes out and watch

to get a sense for the basic sound of a Minimoog. This type of example is usually a good litmus test of whether or not you're going to be a Moog fan. ;)

 

The gentleman in the video is the one and only Dr. Robert Moog, the inventor of many (but not all) of the products that bear his name.

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I am really intrigued by it, I won't lie..

 

Though I do play very chordal-based stuff. Is there something similar to the Moog in terms of capabilities, but has polyphony as well? (Would that Nord 2 fit this description?)

 

My main interest is really to have a machine that can create a lot of lush, spacey sounds. Like I said, techno/dance music type stuff I don't care about..

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Originally posted by bc002k:

Though I do play very chordal-based stuff. Is there something similar to the Moog in terms of capabilities, but has polyphony as well? (Would that Nord 2 fit this description?)

 

My main interest is really to have a machine that can create a lot of lush, spacey sounds. Like I said, techno/dance music type stuff I don't care about..

The Nord fits the specs .. to a degree. The taste for Moog gets refined over time. To make another analogy ... the first time you see a Formula 1 race all the cars might seem fast. After awhile, it becomes obvious which ones have more power and acceleration. The Moogs have a powerful sound that is often copied, never truly duplicated. However for now, something like the Nord Lead 2 would come close. Most modern digital emulations are polyphonic. Some options: Roland SH201, Nord Lead 2, Alesis Ion. These are in the $600 range.

 

There are also some great modern analog polysynths for more coin. These include the Andromeda and PolyEvolver. They get discussed here a lot.

 

Jerry

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Originally posted by bc002k:

My main interest is really to have a machine that can create a lot of lush, spacey sounds. Like I said, techno/dance music type stuff I don't care about..

Even though "lush and spacey" is pretty vague, I sense that you'd instead need something completely different than a Moog. A Moog is more into raw sounds, not really "spacey" at all, except maybe for the fact than it sounded from another galaxy back in the 70s. Not to mention Moog bass type of sounds are often used in techno and dance music, and you say you don't care about that stuff.

 

Personally, for "spacey" sounds (or whatever it might means), I'd choose something more versatile like a Korg Wavestation. Full polyphony, lots of "lush" sounds if needed and everything one needs to create complex spatial wavesequences.

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Before bc002k starts believing that the Minimoog Voyager is monophonic for some mystical reason, let's clarify: Analog circuits are expensive. The better quality components are used, the more expensive the instrument will be. A polyphonic version of the Voyager, which is mostly made with high-quality discrete components, would cost an arm and a leg. One of the reasons digital technology and sample playing has been so widely adopted is, it's much cheaper to reach massive amount of polyphony with it.

 

Personally, for high-quality 'spacey' sounds, I'd recommend a K2600. But even more important, don't buy anything before having spent a few hours playing it. Tastes in sound are highly individual. :)

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